Ålesund

Last updated
Ålesund kommune
Vista de Alesund desde Aksla, Noruega, 2019-09-01, DD 16.jpg
Part of town seen from Aksla viewpoint
Norway Counties More og Romsdal Position.svg
Møre og Romsdal within
Norway
NO 1507 Alesund.svg
Ålesund within Møre og Romsdal
Coordinates: 62°28′40″N06°11′25″E / 62.47778°N 6.19028°E / 62.47778; 6.19028 Coordinates: 62°28′40″N06°11′25″E / 62.47778°N 6.19028°E / 62.47778; 6.19028
Country Norway
County Møre og Romsdal
District Sunnmøre
Established1 Jan 1838
Administrative centre Ålesund
Government
  Mayor (2015) Eva Vinje Aurdal (Ap)
Area
  Total632.42 km2 (244.18 sq mi)
  Land607.32 km2 (234.49 sq mi)
  Water25.10 km2 (9.69 sq mi)  4%
Area rank184 in Norway
Population
 (2020)
  Total66,258
  Rank13 in Norway
  Density109.1/km2 (283/sq mi)
  Change (10 years)
12.1%
Demonym(s) Ålesundar
Ålesunder [1]
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 code NO-1507
Official language form Nynorsk [2] [3]
Website alesund.kommune.no

Ålesund (Norwegian pronunciation:  [ˈôːləsʉn] ( Loudspeaker.svg listen )) is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal County, Norway. It is part of the traditional district of Sunnmøre and the centre of the Ålesund Region. The town of Ålesund is the administrative centre of Ålesund Municipality, as well as the principal shipping town of the Sunnmøre district. The town is a sea port and is noted for its concentration of Art Nouveau architecture. Although sometimes internationally spelled by its older name Aalesund, this spelling is obsolete in Norwegian. However, the local football club Aalesunds FK still carries that spelling, having been founded before the official change.

Contents

The 99-square-kilometre (38 sq mi) municipality is the 184th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Ålesund is the 13th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 66,258. The municipality's population density is 109.1 inhabitants per square kilometre (283/sq mi) and its population has increased by 12.1% over the previous 10-year period. [4] [5]

General information

Population development, 1951-2008
Befolkningsutvikling kommune 1504.svg
Source: Statistics Norway

In 1793, the port of Aalesund was granted limited ladested rights. Later, in 1824, it was granted full ladested rights. In 1835, Ålesund had 482 inhabitants. [6] On 1 January 1838, the new formannskapsdistrikt law went into effect, granting limited local self-government to all parishes in Norway. Therefore, on that date, the small ladested of Aalesund became a small municipality with its own council. It was surrounded by the large rural municipality of Borgund. In 1848, it was upgraded to the status of a kjøpstad, a more important market town.

On 1 January 1875, part of Borgund Municipality (population: 902) was transferred to the town of Ålesund. In 1922, another part of Borgund Municipality (population: 1,148) was transferred to the town of Ålesund. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1968, most of the neighbouring municipality of Borgund (population: 20,132) was merged with the town of Ålesund. This merger vastly increased the land area of the municipality and more than doubled the population of Ålesund, for a new total population of 38,589. On 1 January 1977, the island of Sula and some small surrounding islets (population: 6,302) were separated from Ålesund to form the new Sula Municipality. [7]

On 1 January 2020, the municipality of Ålesund was greatly enlarged when Haram Municipality, Skodje Municipality, Sandøy Municipality, and Ørskog Municipality were merged with Ålesund to form one large municipality of Ålesund. [8]

Toponomy

A part of the town was originally known as Kaupangen Borgund. The Old Norse word kaupang means "marketplace" or "town", thus the market town for Borgund. The Old Norse form of the current name was Álasund. The first element of that (probably) is the plural genitive case of áll which means "eel" and the last element is sund which means "strait" or "sound". [9] Before 1921, the name was written Aalesund.

Coat of arms

The coat of arms was granted on 1 April 1898. The red and silver arms show a fishing boat on the water with three fish swimming. The arms symbolize the importance of fishing for Ålesund. The type of ship was typical for the fishing vessels in the 18th and 19th century and is taken from a drawing made in 1762. The waves and three fish were added to the drawing in the arms. [10]

The arms are shown in the Kaffe Hag album with the boat sailing right instead of sailing left.

Churches

The Church of Norway has twelve parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Ålesund. It is part of the Nordre Sunnmøre prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Møre. The seat of the deanery is at Ålesund Church.

Alesund Church Iglesia parroquial, Alesund, Noruega, 2019-09-01, DD 86.jpg
Ålesund Church
Churches in Ålesund
Parish (sokn)Church nameLocation of the churchYear built
Borgund Borgund Church Borgund 1130
Brattvåg Brattvåg Church Brattvåg 1977
Hildre Church Hildrestranda 1905
Ellingsøy Ellingsøy Church Ellingsøya 1998
Hamnsund Hamnsund Church near Søvik 1875
Haram og Fjørtoft Fjørtoft Church Fjørtofta 1878
Haram Church Austnes 1838
Lepsøy Chapel Lepsøya 1896
Sandøy Sandøy Church Sandøya 1812
Harøy Church Harøya 1934
Skodje Skodje Church Skodje 1860
Spjelkavik Spjelkavik Church Spjelkavik 1987
Vatne Vatne Church Vatne 1868
Volsdalen Volsdalen Church Nørvøya (in Ålesund city)1974
Ålesund Ålesund Church Aspøya (in Ålesund city)1909
Skarbøvik Church Heissa 1995
Ørskog Ørskog Church Sjøholt 1873

History

Alesund, Norway, ca. 1895, before the fire General view, Alesund, Norway LOC 3174173093.jpg
Ålesund, Norway, ca. 1895, before the fire

Legend has it that Gangerolf (outside of Norway better known as Rollo), the 10th-century founder of the dynasty of the dukes of Normandy, hailed from the community of Giske, north-west of Ålesund. At least three statues of Rolle exist: in the town park in Ålesund, in the city of Rouen, France, and in Fargo, North Dakota, United States.

In 1835, Ålesund had 482 inhabitants. [6] By 1900, the population had increased to 11,777. [11]

In the night of 23 January 1904, the town was the scene of the Ålesund Fire, one of the most terrible of the many conflagrations to which Norwegian towns, once built largely of wood, have been subjected. Practically the entire town was destroyed during the night, a gale aiding the flames, and the population had to leave the town in the middle of the night with only a few minutes' notice. Only one person died in the fire, the 76-year-old Ane Heen, but more than 10,000 people were left without shelter. [12]

Jugendstilsenteret - The Art Nouveau Centre of Norway Jugendstilsenteret-modf.jpg
Jugendstilsenteret - The Art Nouveau Centre of Norway

Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany had often been on vacation to Sunnmøre. After the fire, he sent four warships with materials to build temporary shelters and barracks. After a period of planning, the town was rebuilt in stone, brick, and mortar in Jugendstil (Art Nouveau), the architectural style of the time. The structures were designed by approximately 20 master builders and 30 Norwegian architects, most of them educated in Trondheim and Charlottenburg, Berlin, drawing inspiration from all over Europe. To honor Wilhelm, one of the most frequented streets of the town is named after him.

The town has an unusually consistent architecture, most of the buildings having been built between 1904 and 1907. Jugendstilsenteret is a national interpretation centre, visitors can learn more about the town fire, the rebuilding of the town and the Art Nouveau style. Ålesund is a partner in the Art nouveau network, a European network of co-operation created in 1999 for the study, safeguards and development of the Art nouveau.

The term "Little London" was often applied to the community during the occupation of Norway by Nazi Germany due to the Norwegian resistance work that took place here. Among other things, the city was central to the flights to Scotland and England.

Geography

The municipality of Ålesund occupies seven of the outer islands in the county of Møre og Romsdal: Hessa, Aspøya, Nørvøya, Oksenøya, Ellingsøya, Humla, and Tørla. The town centre is located on the islands Aspøya and Nørvøya, while Heissa and Oksnøya contain residential areas.

The second largest island, Ellingsøya, used to be accessible only by boat or by road via Skodje Municipality, but the undersea Ellingsøy Tunnel was built in 1987 to make traveling between the island and the town centre more convenient. The tunnel is 3,481 metres (11,421 ft) long, and was upgraded in 2009.

Situated 236 kilometres (147 mi) north northeast of the city of Bergen, Ålesund is adjacent to the Hjørund and Geiranger fjords, the latter being on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites. [13]

The municipality covers an area of 93 square kilometres (36 sq mi). The population (2017) is 47,199, making the population density of 506.6 inhabitants per square kilometre (1,312/sq mi). The population of the agglomeration, which includes parts of the neighbouring Sula Municipality, is 48,460. [14] The municipality also contains three smaller separate urban areas on the island of Ellingsøya: Hoffland, Årset, and Myklebost with a total population of 1,279. [14] Other villages include Løvika and Spjelkavik, both on Uksenøya.

Climate

Ålesund has a temperate oceanic climate (Köppen Cfb). The mean annual temperature of 8.1 °C (46.6 °F) is extremely warm for the latitude of 62°N. This is in a large part due to the mild autumns and winters, which can sometimes experience strong winds. The record low is from January 2010, and the record high is from July 2018. The warmest temperature ever recorded in the municipality is 34.4 °C (93.9 °F) at a weather station a little east (inland) of city. Atlantic lows can sometimes cause warm winter highs in Ålesund due to foehn effect from winds being forced over the mountains in Sunnmørsalpene.

Climate data for Ålesund 1991-2020 (15 m, Ålesund IV, extremes 2009-2020)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)15.7
(60.3)
16.5
(61.7)
14.1
(57.4)
22.4
(72.3)
26.2
(79.2)
25.7
(78.3)
31.5
(88.7)
28
(82)
24.8
(76.6)
22.7
(72.9)
20.3
(68.5)
16.5
(61.7)
31.5
(88.7)
Daily mean °C (°F)3.3
(37.9)
2.7
(36.9)
3.8
(38.8)
6.4
(43.5)
9.3
(48.7)
12.2
(54.0)
14.5
(58.1)
14.8
(58.6)
12.3
(54.1)
8.4
(47.1)
5.7
(42.3)
3.6
(38.5)
8.1
(46.5)
Record low °C (°F)−10
(14)
−9.8
(14.4)
−7.6
(18.3)
−3.5
(25.7)
−1
(30)
2.3
(36.1)
5.6
(42.1)
6.3
(43.3)
1.3
(34.3)
−2.1
(28.2)
−7.2
(19.0)
−8.7
(16.3)
−10
(14)
Average precipitation mm (inches)146
(5.7)
128
(5.0)
127
(5.0)
77
(3.0)
73
(2.9)
83
(3.3)
81
(3.2)
126
(5.0)
153
(6.0)
169
(6.7)
150
(5.9)
176
(6.9)
1,489
(58.6)
Source: Norwegian Meteorological Institute [15]


Government

All municipalities in Norway, including Ålesund, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elect a mayor. [16] The municipality falls under the Sunnmøre District Court and the Frostating Court of Appeal.

Municipal council

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Ålesund is made up of 77 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Ålesund Kommunestyre 20202023 [17]   
Party Name (in Nynorsk)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)16
  Progress Party (Framstegspartiet)13
  Green Party (Miljøpartiet Dei Grøne)4
  Conservative Party (Høgre)15
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)5
  The Christians Party (Partiet Dei Kristne)1
  Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)2
  Red Party (Raudt)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)10
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
  Ålesund List (Ålesundlista)6
Total number of members:77
Ålesund Kommunestyre 20162019 [18]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)8
  Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)9
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)5
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)1
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
  Ålesund List (Ålesundlista)3
Total number of members:49
Ålesund Kommunestyre 20122015 [19]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)11
  Conservative Party (Høyre)14
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)4
  Ålesund List (Ålesundlista)2
Total number of members:49
Ålesund Kommunestyre 20082011 [18]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)13
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)6
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)1
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
  Cross-party list for Ålesund (Tverrpolitisk liste for Ålesund)5
Total number of members:49
Ålesund Kommunestyre 20042007 [18]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)18
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)7
  Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)6
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
  Cross-party list for Ålesund (Tverrpolitisk liste for Ålesund)7
  Common list for traffic, environment, and schools in Ålesund (Fellesliste for trafikk, miljø og skole i Ålesund)1
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Kommunestyre 20002003 [18]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)10
  Conservative Party (Høyre)11
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)10
  Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)1
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
  Cross-party list (Tverrpolitisk liste)13
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Kommunestyre 19961999 [20]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)9
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)7
  Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
  Cross-party list for Ålesund (Tverrpolitisk liste for Ålesund)14
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Kommunestyre 19921995 [21]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)7
  Conservative Party (Høyre)17
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)8
  Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)7
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Kommunestyre 19881991 [22]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)11
  Conservative Party (Høyre)16
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)8
  Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)4
  Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)1
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
Liberal People's Party (Liberale Folkepartiet)
4
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Kommunestyre 19841987 [23]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)5
  Conservative Party (Høyre)18
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)9
  Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Kommunestyre 19801983 [24]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)21
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)10
  Liberal People's Party (Liberale Folkepartiet)1
  Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Kommunestyre 19761979 [25]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
  Conservative Party (Høyre)14
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)13
  New People's Party (Nye Folkepartiet)3
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
  Non-party election list for Sula (Upolitisk Valliste for Sula)8
  Non-party election list for Borgund (Upolitisk Valliste for Borgund)3
Total number of members:69
Ålesund Kommunestyre 19721975 [26]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)10
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)12
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)9
Total number of members:69
Ålesund Kommunestyre 19681971 [27]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)23
  Conservative Party (Høyre)12
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)8
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)14
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)7
Total number of members:69
Ålesund Bystyre 19641967 [28]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
  Conservative Party (Høyre)12
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)6
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)15
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Bystyre 19601963 [29]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)25
  Conservative Party (Høyre)11
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)6
  Liberal Party (Venstre)18
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Bystyre 19561959 [30]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
  Conservative Party (Høyre)11
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)7
  Liberal Party (Venstre)15
Total number of members:61
Ålesund Bystyre 19521955 [31]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)26
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)7
  Liberal Party (Venstre)16
Total number of members:60
Ålesund Bystyre 19481951 [32]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)21
  Conservative Party (Høyre)11
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)7
  Liberal Party (Venstre)17
Total number of members:60
Ålesund Bystyre 19451947 [33]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)24
  Conservative Party (Høyre)9
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)6
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)8
  Liberal Party (Venstre)13
Total number of members:60
Ålesund Bystyre 19381941* [34]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)25
  Conservative Party (Høyre)11
  Liberal Party (Venstre)22
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)2
Total number of members:60
Ålesund Bystyre 19351937 [35]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)21
  Conservative Party (Høyre)13
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)20
Total number of members:60
Ålesund Bystyre 19321934 [36]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)23
  Temperance Party (Avholdspartiet)6
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)17
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Free-minded People's Party (Frisinnede Folkeparti)
13
Total number of members:60
Ålesund Bystyre 19291931 [37]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
  Temperance Party (Avholdspartiet)7
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)5
  Liberal Party (Venstre)15
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Free-minded Liberal Party (Frisinnede Venstre)
8
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)5
Total number of members:60
Ålesund Bystyre 19261928 [38]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)4
  Temperance Party (Avholdspartiet)9
  Social Democratic Labour Party
(Socialdemokratiske Arbeiderparti)
14
  Liberal Party (Venstre)16
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Free-minded Liberal Party (Frisinnede Venstre)
13
  Workers' Common List (Arbeidernes fellesliste)4
Total number of members:60
Ålesund Bystyre 19231925 [39]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
  Temperance Party (Avholdspartiet)8
  Social Democratic Labour Party
(Socialdemokratiske Arbeiderparti)
20
  Liberal Party (Venstre)7
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Free-minded Liberal Party (Frisinnede Venstre)
14
Total number of members:60
Aalesund Bystyre 19201922 [40]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
  Temperance Party (Avholdspartiet)9
  Liberal Party (Venstre)9
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Free-minded Liberal Party (Frisinnede Venstre)
12
Total number of members:52

Mayor

The mayors of Ålesund (incomplete list):

Economy

Aalesund (Norway) by night. Aalesund (Norway) by night, 7.jpg
Aalesund (Norway) by night.

The town of Ålesund has the most important fishing harbour in Norway. The town's fishing fleet is one of the most modern in Europe. Ålesund and its surroundings also has a large furniture industry. Some well-known household items are manufactured here. In the 1950s and 1960s, Ålesund was one of the chief stations of the herring fishery business.

In relation to the relatively large fishing fleet belonging to Ålesund and nearby harbours a large shipbuilding and ship equipment industry has evolved. There are not any yards building ships in Ålesund any more, the last shipyard - Liaaen Shipyard evolved into ship repairs and since late 1990s has mainly been serving the offshore industry through the company Liaaen Technology [41] that merged and rebranded to Strata Møre in 2007. In the close by communities however shipyards continue to operate successfully: Vard, Ulstein Verft, [42] Kleven Maritime, [43] Havyard Group. [44]

When oil was found in the North Sea in the 1970s the local fishing fleet ship owners seized the opportunity and rebuilt fishing vessels to serve the infant oil exploration and production industry. Soon they were able to build purpose designed offshore vessels at local shipyards to serve the North Sea oil adventure even better. Today this has become a cornerstone industry in and around Ålesund through leading offshore supply ship owning companies Farstad, [45] Bourbon, [46] Olympic, [47] Havila, [48] and Rem. [49] Serving the ship building industry a large number of equipment manufacturers has evolved: Rolls Royce, [50] Odim, [51] Sperre, [52] Optimar, [53] Ship Equip, [54] Jets [55] and many more.

To the east of Ålesund lies the Sykkylven Municipality where the Ekornes factory, producing furniture such as the StressLess chair, is located. Håhjem, another village near Ålesund, contains the headquarters of the Stokke company. Ålesund is also one of the harbours at which the Hurtigruten arrives two times per day. As the cultural center of the region and with close proximity to the fjords, Ålesund is a tourist attraction. [56] The Atlanterhavsparken aquarium is another tourist attraction. [57]

Transportation

MS Polarlys in Alesund (December 2005) Hurtigr aalesund MH5Y3639 2.jpg
MS Polarlys in Ålesund (December 2005)

From Øye at the head of Hjørundfjorden, a road strikes south to the Nordfjorden, and from Maråk on Geirangerfjorden another strikes inland to Otta. The Rauma Line starts at Åndalsnes, 120 kilometres (75 mi) east of Ålesund, going to Dombås, then southwards on the Dovre Line to Lillehammer and Oslo. Ålesund is a port of call for passenger and freight vessels travelling between Bergen, Kingston upon Hull, Newcastle, Hamburg, and Trondheim, including the Hurtigruta (Norwegian Coastal Express) cruise ships, which arrive in Ålesund twice a day.

The town's airport, Ålesund Airport, Vigra, has several daily flights to/from Oslo, Bergen, Trondheim, and Copenhagen. It used to have several weekly flights to/from Riga (Riga International Airport) (AirBaltic) and London (London Gatwick Airport) but these routes have since ceased. In November 2012 KLM announced it would fly to Ålesund 5 days a week from Amsterdam starting in April 2013. [58]

Lately, there have been suggestions[ clarification needed ] of a high-speed rail link to Oslo, Bergen, and Trondheim, as well as metro-style local services to meet the needs of the expanding population of the town[ citation needed ].

Culture

The inner harbour in winter Alesund harbour.jpg
The inner harbour in winter

The Norwegian Centre of Art Nouveau Architecture, Jugendstilsenteret, is situated in Ålesund. It is a museum and interpretive center, with exhibitions telling the story of the town fire and Art Nouveu/Jugendstil in Norway and Europe.

Sunnmøre museum, [59] founded in 1931, is an outdoor folk museum devoted to the Norwegian coastal culture and way of life. Located on an area of 120 hectares (50 acres), it has more than 55 old and distinct houses from the past 300 years moved to the site, replicas of old Viking ships, and the Medieval Age Museum with artifacts from excavations of the old trading centre.

The local newspaper is Sunnmørsposten , founded in 1882 and published six days a week. The newspaper Arbeidernes blad was briefly published in Ålesund in 1898. [60] [61] Ålesund is the site of the annual Norwegian Food Festival.

Education

Ålesund is home to a sub-division of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), with approximately 1,800 students and 150 employees. The Ålesund School of Art (Norwegian : Ålesund Kunstskole) is a school for visual arts located in Ålesund. The Norwegian School of Management had a campus in Ålesund, but it closed on 1 August 2008. [62]

Ålesund videregående skole, also known as Latinskolen, formerly Aalesund Lærd- og Realskole, is the oldest secondary school in Ålesund, having been established in 1863. [63] Of the six upper secondary schools in Ålesund, including Latinskolen, Fagerlia videregående skole is the largest with room for approximately 1,000 students.

Ålesund also features an International school for children aged 5–15. [64]

Sport

The local football team, Aalesunds FK (Aalesunds Fotballklubb) was founded in 1914. The team played in the Norwegian top flight for the first time in the 2003 season. The club won its first Norwegian Cup in 2009 and won again in 2011. They played their home matches at Kråmyra Stadium until the 2005 season, when they relocated to the new Color Line Stadium, located approximately 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) outside the town centre. AaFK's supporter club is called "Stormen" and has about 2,000 members.

Notable residents

Edvard Moser, 2015 Edvard Moser 2015.jpg
Edvard Moser, 2015
Erik Torrissen, 2011 Erik Torrissen.jpg
Erik Tørrissen, 2011

Public Service & business

The Arts

Hedvig Mollestad, 2019 Hedvig Mollestad 2019.jpg
Hedvig Mollestad, 2019
Bjorn Johan Muri, 2010 Bjorn Johan Muri.JPG
Bjørn Johan Muri, 2010
John Arne Riise, 2009 John Arne Riise.JPG
John Arne Riise, 2009
Nina Haver-Loeseth, 2018 The winner, Nina Haver-Loeseth.jpg
Nina Haver-Loeseth, 2018

Sport

Mark Kozelek wrote and performed an eponymous song about Ålesund under the Sun Kil Moon moniker, on the record Admiral Fell Promises.
Ålesund was shown briefly at about the 20:17 mark in the 1969 film, "It's Tough to Be a Bird," by Disney. The town is shown being stepped on by an enormous bird foot.

Twin towns – sister cities

Ålesund is twinned with: [66]

See also

Related Research Articles

Vanylven Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Vanylven is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre is the village of Fiskåbygd. Other villages in the municipality include Åheim, Åram, Rovdane, Eidså, Slagnes, and Myklebost.

Sande, Møre og Romsdal Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Sande is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre is the village of Larsnes on the island of Gurskøya. Other villages in Sande include Gursken, Sandshamn, Bringsinghaug, and Voksa.

Herøy, Møre og Romsdal Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Herøy is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre is the town of Fosnavåg on the island of Bergsøya. The industrial area of Eggesbønes is located south of Fosnavåg on the same island. The Runde Environmental Centre is located in the northern part of the municipality on Runde island. Other population centres in Herøy include the villages of Leikong, Kvalsund, or Moltustranda.

Ulstein Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Ulstein is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region. The commercial and administrative centre of Ulstein is the town of Ulsteinvik. The municipality occupies the western half of the island of Hareidlandet, as well as about 30 smaller islands, four of which are populated.

Hareid Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Hareid is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre is the village of Hareid. The other main population centers are Brandal and Hjørungavåg.

Volda Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Volda is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre is the village of Volda. Other villages in the municipality include Dravlaus, Fyrde, Straumshamn, Leira, Bjørke, and Grodås. The municipality is located about 50 kilometres (31 mi) south of the town of Ålesund.

Ørsta Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Ørsta  is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region of Western Norway. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Ørsta. Other villages in the municipality include Hovdebygda, Flåskjer, Liadal, Urke, Barstadvik, Åmdalen, Follestaddalen, Nordre Vartdal, Vartdal, Sæbø, Sætre, Store-Standal, and Ytre Standal.

Ørskog Former municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Ørskog is a former municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It was part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre was the village of Sjøholt. The other main village was Vaksvika, about 7.5 kilometres (4.7 mi) south of Sjøholt. The European Route E39/E136 highway runs through the municipality, connecting the towns of Ålesund and Molde. Rauma Group is the largest company in Ørskog in terms of turnover.

Norddal Former municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Norddal is a former municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It merged with Stordal municipality to establish the new Fjord municipality in 2020. It covered the easternmost part of the Sunnmøre region along the border with Oppland county. The municipal center of the municipality was the village of Sylte in the Valldalen valley.

Stranda Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Stranda is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Stranda. Stranda consists of three smaller villages and one larger central village. The smaller villages are Hellesylt, Geiranger, and Liabygda. The central village, Stranda, has about 2,600 inhabitants. Stranda Municipality is known for tourist attractions like the Geirangerfjorden Sunnylvsfjorden and its skiarea at Strandafjellet

Sykkylven Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Sykkylven is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre is the village of Aure. Other villages in the municipality include Ikornnes, Straumgjerde, and Tusvik.

Skodje Former municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Skodje is a former municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It was part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre was the village of Skodje. The other main village in the municipality was Valle.

Giske Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Giske is an island municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The municipality lies north-northwest of the town of Ålesund in the traditional district of Sunnmøre. The municipal centre is Valderhaugstrand. Other population centres include the villages of Roald and Alnes and Leitebakk. The municipality is part of the Ålesund Region.

Haram, Norway Former municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Haram is a former municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It was part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative center was Brattvåg, the industrial center of Sunnmøre. Other important villages in the municipality included Austnes, Eidsvik, Helle, Longva, Hildrestranda, Søvik, Tennfjord, and Vatne.

Sandøy Former municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Sandøy is a former municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It was part of the Romsdal region. The administrative centre was the village of Steinshamn. Other villages included Ona and Myklebost. The municipality was spread out over many islands in the mouth of the vast Romsdal Fjord. The Flatflesa Lighthouse and Ona Lighthouse protect the boats traveling around the municipality. The Nordøy Fixed Link project was constructed from 2018 until 2023 and it includes three undersea tunnels and several bridges that will connect the main islands of Sandøy Municipality and the islands of Haram Municipality to the mainland.

Lærdal Municipality in Vestland, Norway

Lærdal is a municipality in Vestland county, Norway. It is located on the south side of the Sognefjorden in the traditional district of Sogn. The administrative center of the municipality is the village of Lærdalsøyri. The old Filefjell Kongevegen road passes through Lærdal on its way to Valdres and later to Oslo.

Fjaler Municipality in Vestland, Norway

Fjaler is a municipality in the county of Vestland, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Sunnfjord. The administrative centre is the village of Dale. Other places in Fjaler include Espedal, Flekke, Folkestad, Guddal, and Hellevika.

Sula, Møre og Romsdal Municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Sula  is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the Sunnmøre district. The administrative centre is the village of Langevåg. Other villages include Solevåg, Fiskarstrand, Veibust, Leirvågen, and Mauseidvåg. Sula is one of the most densely populated municipalities in Møre og Romsdal county, and it is part of the Ålesund Region since it is just south of the city of Ålesund. The municipality encompasses the island of Sula and the many small surrounding islets.

Sørøysund Former municipality in Finnmark, Norway

Sørøysund is a former municipality in Finnmark county, Norway. The 826-square-kilometre (319 sq mi) municipality existed from 1852 until its dissolution in 1992. It is located in the present-day municipality of Hammerfest. The former municipality encompassed the eastern part of the island of Sørøya, the northern part of the island of Seiland, and the northern part of Kvaløya. The administrative centre of Sørøysund was the town of Hammerfest, even though the town was not part of Sørøysund.

Borgund, Møre og Romsdal Former municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Borgund is a former municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The municipality existed from 1837 until 1968 when it was merged into Ålesund Municipality. Borgund originally encompassed the large area north of the Storfjorden and south of the Grytafjorden, from the mainland areas of today's Skodje Municipality in the east to the islands of today's Giske Municipality and the ocean in the west. The city of Ålesund was located in the central part of Borgund, however, was not part of Borgund, and it was governed separately. At its dissolution in 1968, the 172.93-square-kilometre (66.77 sq mi) municipality included the islands of Sula, Humla, Tørla, and Ellingsøya, as well as parts of Oksenøya, Hessa, and Nørvøya, plus many minor islands throughout the area. The main church for the municipality was Borgund Church, located at Borgund. The administrative centre of the municipality was at Borgund, near the church, along the Nørvasundet strait.

References

  1. "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. "Knapt fleirtal for nynorsk i Ålesund". framtida.no (in Norwegian). 13 December 2019.
  3. "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  4. Statistisk sentralbyrå (2020). "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. Statistisk sentralbyrå (2020). "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  6. 1 2 https://www.ssb.no/a/histstat/nos/st_08r_1836-45.pdf
  7. Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  8. "Nye Ålesund" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2017-10-19.
  9. "Betydningen Ålesund" (in Norwegian). Ålesund kommune. 2007. Archived from the original on 2009-02-17. Retrieved 2007-10-16.
  10. "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 2019-08-14.
  11. https://www.ssb.no/a/histstat/nos/nos_iv_052.pdf
  12. "Historical journey in the Municipality of Aalesund". www.alesund.kommune.no. 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-10.
  13. "West Norwegian Fjords – Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord". UNESCO. Retrieved 2007-10-16.
  14. 1 2 Statistisk sentralbyrå (1 January 2012). "Urban settlements. Population and area, by municipality".
  15. http://sharki.oslo.dnmi.no/portal/page?_pageid=73,39035,73_39080&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
  16. Hansen, Tore, ed. (2016-05-12). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget . Retrieved 2019-04-06.
  17. "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Møre og Romsdal" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway. Retrieved 2019-10-19.
  18. 1 2 3 4 "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  19. "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Møre og Romsdal" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway. Retrieved 2019-10-19.
  20. "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  21. "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  22. "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  23. "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  24. "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  25. "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  26. "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  27. "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  28. "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  29. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  30. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  31. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  32. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  33. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  34. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938. Retrieved 2020-05-01.
  35. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1934" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1935. Retrieved 2020-05-03.
  36. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1931" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1932. Retrieved 2020-05-03.
  37. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1928" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1929. Retrieved 2020-05-03.
  38. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1925" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1926. Retrieved 2020-05-03.
  39. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1922" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1923. Retrieved 2020-05-03.
  40. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1919" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1920. Retrieved 2020-05-03.
  41. http://www.liaaen.no/
  42. http://www.ulsteingroup.com/kunder/ulstein/cms66.nsf/
  43. http://www.klevenmaritime.no/
  44. http://www.havyard.com/
  45. http://www.farstad.com/
  46. http://www.bourbon-offshore.com/
  47. http://www.olympic.no/
  48. http://www.havila.no/
  49. http://www.rem.no/
  50. http://www.rolls-royce.com
  51. http://www.odim.no/
  52. http://www.sperre.com/
  53. http://www.optimar.no/en/Default.aspx/
  54. http://www.ship-equip.com/
  55. http://www.optimar.no/en/Default.aspx/
  56. "Ålesund & Sunnmøre". Visit Norway. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  57. "The Times & The Sunday Times". thetimes.co.uk. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  58. "KLM to launch scheduled service to Ålesund". klm.com. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  59. "Sunnmøre Museum, Aalesund". sunnmore.museum.no. Retrieved 31 August 2017.
  60. Aalhus, Fride Vedde (2010). Sunnmørsposten: strategier og konkurransesituasjon (PDF). Bergen: University of Bergen. p. 11. Retrieved December 30, 2019.
  61. Roland, Asle (1979). "Arbeideraviser og arbeiderorganisering. Avisaktivitet i den norske arbeiderbevegelsen 1880–1903". Tidsskrift for arbeiderbevegelsens historie. 1: 44. Retrieved December 30, 2019.
  62. "Om BI Ålesund" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2007-10-16.
  63. Ivar Gunnar Braaten. "Ja til Latinskolen" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 2008-01-12. Retrieved 2007-10-16.
  64. "AaIS - Home". Aalesund International School. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  65. IMDb Database retrieved 27 March 2021
  66. "Vennskapsbyer". åbv.no (in Norwegian). Ålesund Kommune. Retrieved 2021-01-31.