Łobżenica

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Łobżenica
Wieza cisnien + stara gazownia.JPG
Historic gasworks (now a shop) and water tower in Łobżenica
POL Lobzenica flag.svg
Flag
POL Lobzenica COA.svg
Coat of arms
Poland adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Łobżenica
Greater Poland Voivodeship location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Łobżenica
Coordinates: 53°16′N17°15′E / 53.267°N 17.250°E / 53.267; 17.250
CountryFlag of Poland.svg  Poland
Voivodeship Greater Poland
County Piła
Gmina Łobżenica
Town rightsbefore 1438
Area
  Total3.25 km2 (1.25 sq mi)
Elevation
100 m (300 ft)
Population
 (2006)
  Total3,172
  Density980/km2 (2,500/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
89-310
Website http://www.lobzenica.pl

Łobżenica [wɔbʐɛˈɲit͡sa] (German : Lobsens) is a town in Piła County, Greater Poland Voivodeship, Poland, with 3,211 inhabitants (2004).

Contents

History

17th-century Polish coins from the Lobzenica mint Trzeciak koronny 1626 Lobzenica.jpg
17th-century Polish coins from the Łobżenica mint

Łobżenica dates back to the 11th century. [1] It prospered due to its location between Gdańsk Pomerania and central Poland. [1] It was granted town rights before 1438, most likely in the 14th century by King Władysław I Łokietek or Casimir III the Great of the Piast dynasty. [1] Łobżenica was a private town located in the Kalisz Voivodeship in the Greater Poland Province of the Polish Crown. It was ravaged by the Teutonic Knights in 1431 and 1457. [1] The town prospered thanks to crafts, brewing and trade. Local merchants participated in trade with large Polish cities of Poznań, Bydgoszcz, Toruń and Gdańsk, as well as other nearby towns. [1] In 1606, Scottish merchants settled in the town. [1] In the years 1612-1630 a mint operated in Łobżenica. [1] In the 17th century, Łobżenica became a Reformation center under the patronage of the Grudziński family. [1]

A memorial stone at the site of mass executions of Poles by Germans in 1939 Lobzenica, WWII monument, 1996.jpg
A memorial stone at the site of mass executions of Poles by Germans in 1939

After the late 18th century Partitions of Poland, the town was annexed by Prussia. It was reintegrated with Poland, soon after the country regained independence in 1918. After the invasion of Poland, which started World War II, the Germans carried out mass arrests and executions among local Poles in 1939, mainly as part of the Intelligenzaktion , murdering about 200 people in October and November 1939 in the Łobżenica massacre  [ pl ]. [2]

Sports

The local football team is Pogoń Łobżenica, which competes in the lower leagues. [3]

Notable people

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Historia Łobżenicy". Urząd Miejski Gminy Łobżenica (in Polish). Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  2. Maria Wardzyńska, Był rok 1939. Operacja niemieckiej policji bezpieczeństwa w Polsce. Intelligenzaktion, IPN, Warszawa, 2009, p. 163-164 (in Polish)
  3. "Pogoń Łobżenica - strona klubu" (in Polish). Retrieved 9 May 2020.


Coordinates: 53°16′00″N17°15′00″E / 53.26667°N 17.25000°E / 53.26667; 17.25000