Ōhāriu (New Zealand electorate)

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Ohariu electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election Ohariu electorate, 2014.svg
Ōhāriu electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Ōhāriu, previously spelled Ohariu and then Ōhariu, is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives. It first existed from 1978 to 1993, and was recreated for the 2008 election. In 2008, it was the successor to Ohariu-Belmont, first contested at the first mixed-member proportional (MMP) election in 1996. Through its existence Ohariu-Belmont was represented by Peter Dunne, leader of the United Future party. Dunne contested and won the recreated electorate in 2008. He announced on 21 August 2017, he would not be seeking re-election in the 2017 general election.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

2008 New Zealand general election election

The 2008 New Zealand general election was held on 8 November 2008 to determine the composition of the 49th New Zealand parliament. The conservative National Party, headed by its parliamentary leader John Key, won the largest share of votes and seats, ending nine years of government by the social-democratic Labour Party, led by Helen Clark. Key announced a week later that he would lead a National minority government with confidence-and-supply support from the ACT, United Future and Māori parties. The Governor-General swore Key in as New Zealand's 38th Prime Minister on 19 November 2008. This marked an end to nine years of Labour Party government, and the beginning of the Fifth National Government of New Zealand which would govern for 9 years, until its loss to the Labour Party in the 2017 general election.

Contents

Population centres

The 1977 electoral redistribution was the most overtly political since the Representation Commission had been established through an amendment to the Representation Act in 1886, initiated by Muldoon's National Government. [1] As part of the 1976 census, a large number of people failed to fill in an electoral re-registration card, and census staff had not been given the authority to insist on the card being completed. This had little practical effect for people on the general roll, but it transferred Māori to the general roll if the card was not handed in. Together with a northward shift of New Zealand's population, this resulted in five new electorates having to be created in the upper part of the North Island. [2] The electoral redistribution was very disruptive, and 22 electorates were abolished, while 27 electorates were newly created (including Ohariu) or re-established. These changes came into effect for the 1978 election. [3]

Robert Muldoon Prime Minister of New Zealand, politician

Sir Robert David Muldoon, also known as Rob Muldoon, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand, from 1975 to 1984, while Leader of the National Party.

Third National Government of New Zealand

The Third National Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1975 to 1984. It was an economically and socially conservative government, which aimed to preserve the Keynesian economic system established by the First Labour government while also being socially conservative. Throughout its three terms it was led by Robert Muldoon, a populist but antagonistic politician who was sometimes described as his party's best asset and worst liability.

Māori people indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of canoe voyages some time between 1250 and 1300. Over several centuries in isolation, the Polynesian settlers developed a unique culture, with their own language, a rich mythology, and distinctive crafts and performing arts. Early Māori formed tribal groups based on eastern Polynesian social customs and organisation. Horticulture flourished using plants they introduced; later, a prominent warrior culture emerged.

The Ohariu electorate replaced the Karori electorate, but did not include any of Khandallah or Ngaio. [4]

Karori was a New Zealand electorate, situated in the west of Wellington. It existed from 1946 to 1978, and was represented by three different Members of Parliament during that period.

Khandallah suburb of Wellington, New Zealand

Khandallah is a suburb of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. It is located 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) northeast of the city centre, on hills overlooking Wellington Harbour.

Ngaio, New Zealand suburb of Wellington City

Ngaio is an inner suburb of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. It is situated on the slopes of Mount Kaukau, 3500 metres north of the city's CBD. It was settled in the 1840s and many of its streets are named after early settler families. Ngaio was originally a logging community known first as Upper Kaiwarra, then as Crofton until 1908. The area was administratively part of a separate local authority called the Onslow Borough Council which amalgamated with Wellington City in 1919.

In 2008, the boundaries of the Ohariu-Belmont and Ōhariu electorates were near identical except for the removal of the eponymous Lower Hutt suburb of Belmont into the Rimutaka electorate and the addition of Crofton Downs from Wellington Central. The new electorate contained the section of Wellington City between Crofton Downs and southern Tawa, including Ngaio, Khandallah, Johnsonville and Newlands. The rest of the electorate consisted of Lower Hutt's hill suburbs of Korokoro, Maungaraki and Normandale. Ōhariu was one of eleven electorate names to include a macron, for the first time. The name was later changed to include a second macron.

Lower Hutt Place in Wellington, New Zealand

Lower Hutt is a city in the Wellington Region of the North Island of New Zealand. Administered by the Hutt City Council, it is one of the four cities that constitute the Wellington metropolitan area.

Belmont, a suburb of Lower Hutt, to the north of Wellington in the North Island of New Zealand, lies on the west bank of the Hutt River, on State Highway 2, the Wellington-Hutt main road, and across the river from the centre of Lower Hutt.

Rimutaka (New Zealand electorate) electorate

Rimutaka is an electorate returning one member to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current representative is Chris Hipkins, a member of the Labour Party who has represented the seat since 2008.

Both Ohariu-Belmont and Ōhāriu are young and wealthy; it has the largest number of 30- to 49-year-olds in the country, and the second highest number of families earning between $70,000 and $100,000 per year. 69% of its population is New Zealand European, 14% Asian and 8% Māori. [5]

History

Despite Dunne having a 7,702 vote majority in Ohariu-Belmont at the 2005 election, [6] United's performance was less impressive. In 2005 it won just 5.6% of the party vote (down from 13.0% in 2002) in an electorate dominated by the big two parties: National came out on top in the party vote with 43.1%, beating Labour by 3.6%, having been reduced to 24.4% three years earlier. [7]

2005 New Zealand general election general election

The 2005 New Zealand general election on Saturday 17 September 2005 determined the membership of the 48th New Zealand Parliament. One hundred and twenty-one MPs were elected to the New Zealand House of Representatives: 69 from single-member electorates, including one overhang seat, and 52 from party lists.

2002 New Zealand general election

The 2002 New Zealand general election was held on 27 July 2002 to determine the composition of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. It saw the reelection of Helen Clark's Labour Party government, as well as the worst-ever performance by the opposition National Party.

Historically Ohariu (without any macrons) was an electorate based around north and western Wellington, contested between 1978 and 1990. A substantial redrawing of Wellington's boundaries ahead of the last First Past the Post election in 1993 led to Ohariu being divided between Wellington-Karori and the new electorate of Onslow. Dunne, then a member of the Labour Party, was the MP for the old Ohariu between 1984 until its abolition, and won Onslow in 1993.

Members of Parliament

Key

  National     Labour     United Future     Green   

ElectionWinner
1978 election Hugh Templeton
1981 election
1984 election Peter Dunne
1987 election
1990 election
(Electorate abolished 1993–2008, see Onslow)
2008 election Peter Dunne
2011 election
2014 election
2017 election Greg O'Connor

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Ōhāriu electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
2008 election Charles Chauvel
Katrina Shanks
2011 election Charles Chauvel
Gareth Hughes
Katrina Shanks
2014 election Brett Hudson
2017 election

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Ōhāriu [8]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Greg O'Connor 17,08442.97+8.3114,30635.44+12.03
National Brett Hudson 16,03340.33+23.8318,27745.28−4.95
Opportunities Jessica Hammond Doube2,8987.291,6784.16
Green Tane Woodley2,5226.34−1.113,8819.61−5.39
NZ First Lisa Close7511.89+0.021,5023.72−1.05
United Future Bale Nadakuitavuki2840.71−35.87780.19−0.54
ACT Andie Moore1850.47−0.092390.59−0.18
Māori  1860.46−0.10
Conservative  710.18−2.81
Legalise Cannabis  680.17−0.22
Outdoors  230.06
Ban 1080  180.04±0.00
People's Party  130.03
Democrats  80.02−0.04
Internet  80.02−0.67 [lower-alpha 1]
Mana  50.01−0.68 [lower-alpha 2]
Informal votes30584
Total Valid votes39,75740,361
Turnout 40,445
Labour gain from United Future Majority1,0512.64+0.73

2014 election

2014 general election: Ōhāriu [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
United Future Green check.svgY Peter Dunne 13,56936.58−2.002730.73−1.05
Labour Ginny Andersen 12,85934.66−0.188,77123.42−3.11
National Brett Hudson 6,12016.50−2.0618,81050.23+0.63
Green Tane Woodley2,7647.45+1.655,62315.01+0.59
Conservative Michael Brunner1,0382.80+1.781,1182.99+1.31
Independent Sue Hamill2110.57+0.57
ACT Sean Fitzpatrick2090.56+0.562500.67−0.09
Democrats Alida Steemson460.12+0.12220.06+0.03
NZ First  1,7814.76+0.85
Internet Mana  2580.69+0.50 [lower-alpha 3]
Māori  2150.57+0.04
Legalise Cannabis  1460.39−0.03
Civilian  290.08+0.08
Ban 1080  150.04+0.04
Independent Coalition  90.02+0.02
Focus  40.01+0.01
Informal votes283126
Total Valid votes37,09937,450
United Future holdMajority7101.91−1.83

2011 election

2011 general election: Ōhāriu [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
United Future Green check.svgY Peter Dunne 14,35738.58+5.976721.78-0.43
Labour Charles Chauvel 12,96534.84+4.8910,03626.53-6.80
National Katrina Shanks 6,90718.56-7.9718,76449.60+3.33
Green Gareth Hughes 2,1605.80-1.265,45314.42+5.28
Conservative Stephen Woodnutt3781.02+1.026361.68+1.68
NZ First Hugh Barr3390.91+0.911,4783.91+1.82
Libertarianz Sean Fitzpatrick1090.29+0.29470.12+0.07
ACT  2860.76-2.66
Māori  2010.53-0.20
Legalise Cannabis  1600.42+0.11
Mana  730.19+0.19
Alliance  120.03-0.11
Democrats  100.03+0.003
Informal votes369137
Total Valid votes37,21537,828
United Future holdMajority1,3923.74+1.07

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 46,740 [11]

2008 election

2008 general election: Ōhariu [12]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
United Future Green check.svgY Peter Dunne 12,30332.618432.21
Labour Charles Chauvel 11,29729.9512,72833.33
National Katrina Shanks 10,00926.5317,67046.27
Green Gareth Hughes 2,6657.063,4889.13
Kiwi Joel Sison5221.382830.74
ACT Colin du Plessis4871.291,3043.41
Legalise Cannabis Danyl Strype3300.871190.31
Alliance Kelly Buchanan1110.29550.14
NZ First  7982.09
Māori  2780.73
Progressive  2730.71
Bill and Ben  2080.54
Family Party  650.17
Pacific  220.06
Libertarianz  200.05
Workers Party  110.03
Democrats  90.02
RAM  70.02
RONZ  70.02
Informal votes24288
Total Valid votes37,72438,188
United Future win new seatMajority1,0062.67

1990 election

1990 general election: Ohariu [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Peter Dunne 9,930 45.04 -13.56
National George Mathew9,14741.49
Green Gary Reese1,8398.34
NewLabour Chris Ritchie6823.09
McGillicuddy Serious G E M Boutel1380.62
Independent A R Kirk1310.59
Social Credit A E Smith910.41
Democrats Bob Stevenson850.38
Majority7833.55-16.72
Turnout 22,04386.25-4.14
Registered electors 25,557

1987 election

1987 general election: Ohariu [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Peter Dunne 12,983 58.60 +20.68
National David Lloyd8,49138.33
Democrats W J Campbell4482.02
McGillicuddy Serious D J R Alyward1360.61
NZ Party K L Ralph940.42
Majority4,49220.27+14.00
Turnout 22,15290.39-4.78
Registered electors 24,507

1984 election

1984 general election: Ohariu [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Peter Dunne 8,282 37.92
National Hugh Templeton 6,91131.64-13.96
NZ Party Bob Jones 6,32628.97
Social Credit Kathleen Loncar2751.25
United front R T Obee420.19
Majority1,3716.27
Turnout 21,83695.17+4.31
Registered electors 22,944

1981 election

1981 general election: Ohariu [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Hugh Templeton 9,261 45.60 -1.05
Labour Norman Ely7,69437.88
Social Credit Eric Elliot3,10215.27+4.60
LIFE PartyN L Mander2501.23
Majority1,5677.71-2.66
Turnout 20,30790.86+21.68
Registered electors 22,349

1978 election

1978 general election: Ohariu [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Hugh Templeton 8,809 46.65
Labour Helene Ritchie 6,85136.28
Social Credit Eric Elliott2,01510.67
Values H R P Wilson7353.89
Right to Life Don Gee4712.49
Majority1,95810.37
Turnout 18,88169.18
Registered electors 27,290

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 8–9, 51, 119.
  2. McRobie 1989, p. 119.
  3. McRobie 1989, pp. 115–120.
  4. McRobie 1989, pp. 114–119.
  5. – New Zealand Parliament Electorate Profiles: Ohariu-Belmont
  6. election result Ohariu-Belmont 2005
  7. election result Ohariu-Belmont 2002
  8. "Ōhāriu – Official Result". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  9. 2014 election results
  10. 2011 election results
  11. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  12. 2008 election results
  13. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1990.
  14. 1 2 3 4 Norton 1988, pp. 294.

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References

  1. 2017 Internet swing is relative to the votes for Internet Mana in 2014; it shared a party list with Mana in the 2014 election.
  2. 2017 Mana swing is relative to the votes for Internet Mana in 2014; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.
  3. 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.