Șăulia

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Șăulia
Saulia jud Mures.png
Location in Mureș County
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Șăulia
Location in Romania
Coordinates: 46°38′N24°13′E / 46.633°N 24.217°E / 46.633; 24.217 Coordinates: 46°38′N24°13′E / 46.633°N 24.217°E / 46.633; 24.217
CountryFlag of Romania.svg  Romania
County Mureș
Population
 (2011) [1]
2,018
Time zone EET/EEST (UTC+2/+3)
Vehicle reg. MS

Șăulia (Hungarian : Mezősályi, Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈmɛzøːʃaːji] ) is a commune in Mureș County, Transylvania, Romania that is composed of four villages: Leorința-Șăulia (Lőrincidűlő), Măcicășești (Szteuniadülő), Pădurea (Erdőtanya) and Șăulia. It has a population of 2,117: 87% Romanians, 10% Roma and 3% Hungarians.

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References

  1. "Populaţia stabilă pe judeţe, municipii, oraşe şi localităti componenete la RPL_2011" (in Romanian). National Institute of Statistics. Retrieved 4 February 2014.