1584

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1584 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1584
MDLXXXIV
Ab urbe condita 2337
Armenian calendar 1033
ԹՎ ՌԼԳ
Assyrian calendar 6334
Balinese saka calendar 1505–1506
Bengali calendar 991
Berber calendar 2534
English Regnal year 26  Eliz. 1   27  Eliz. 1
Buddhist calendar 2128
Burmese calendar 946
Byzantine calendar 7092–7093
Chinese calendar 癸未(Water  Goat)
4280 or 4220
     to 
甲申年 (Wood  Monkey)
4281 or 4221
Coptic calendar 1300–1301
Discordian calendar 2750
Ethiopian calendar 1576–1577
Hebrew calendar 5344–5345
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1640–1641
 - Shaka Samvat 1505–1506
 - Kali Yuga 4684–4685
Holocene calendar 11584
Igbo calendar 584–585
Iranian calendar 962–963
Islamic calendar 991–992
Japanese calendar Tenshō 12
(天正12年)
Javanese calendar 1503–1504
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 3917
Minguo calendar 328 before ROC
民前328年
Nanakshahi calendar 116
Thai solar calendar 2126–2127
Tibetan calendar 阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1710 or 1329 or 557
     to 
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1711 or 1330 or 558
March 18: Feodor I becomes Tsar. Fyodor&boris.jpg
March 18: Feodor I becomes Tsar.

1584 ( MDLXXXIV ) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1584, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are AG, such as the years 1888, 1928, 1956, 1984, 2012, 2040, 2068, 2096, 2108, 2136, 2164, and 2192 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1996 and 2024 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

June 4: Roanoke Island is discovered. Roanoke map 1584.JPG
June 4: Roanoke Island is discovered.

JanuaryJune

January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the first of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Year's Day. It is, on average, the coldest month of the year within most of the Northern Hemisphere and the warmest month of the year within most of the Southern Hemisphere. In the Southern hemisphere, January is the seasonal equivalent of July in the Northern hemisphere and vice versa.

Russia transcontinental country in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia

Russia, or the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country in Eastern Europe and North Asia. At 17,125,200 square kilometres (6,612,100 sq mi), Russia is by a considerable margin the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with about 146.79 million people as of 2019, including Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital, Moscow, is one of the largest cities in the world and the second largest city in Europe; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. However, Russia recognises two more countries that border it, Abkhazia and South Ossetia, both of which are internationally recognized as parts of Georgia.

Ivan the Terrible Grand Prince of Moscow and 1st Tsar of Russia

Ivan IV Vasilyevich, commonly known as Ivan the Terrible, was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1533 to 1547 and the first Tsar of Russia from 1547 to 1584.

JulyDecember

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

July 5 is the 186th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 179 days remain until the end of the year.

Rome Capital of Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

Date unknown

Ratu Hijau was a Malay sovereign queen of Patani who reigned from 1584–1616. Her name means "the Green Queen" in English. She was also known as the 'great queen of Patani'.

A queen regnant is a female monarch, equivalent in rank to a king, who reigns in her own right, as opposed to a queen consort, who is the wife of a reigning king, or a queen regent, who is the guardian of a child monarch and reigns temporarily in the child's stead. An empress regnant is a female monarch who reigns in her own right over an empire.

Malays (ethnic group) Ethnic group

Malays are an Austronesian ethnic group and nation native to the Malay Peninsula, eastern Sumatra of Indonesia and coastal Borneo, as well as the smaller islands which lie between these locations — areas that are collectively known as the Malay world. These locations are today part of the nations of Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia and Southern Thailand.

Births

Archduchess Marie of Austria Archduchess Maria 1584-1649.jpg
Archduchess Marie of Austria

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Charles de Lorme French physician

Charles de Lorme, Delorme, d'lorm, or De l'Orme, was a French medical doctor who practiced in several regions across Europe during the 17th century. Charles was the son of Jean Delorme, who was the primary doctor to Marie de' Medici. This ultimately opened doors for Charles' medical career soon after he graduated from the University of Montpellier in 1607 at the age of 23. He first came to Paris after graduation to practice medicine under the watchful eye of his father, until he was ready to practice as a regular doctor on his own. There are no records of his marriages, except that he married for the third time at the age of 78. This wife died within a year.

1678 Year

1678 (MDCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1678th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 678th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1678, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Deaths

Bernal Diaz del Castillo Bernal Diaz del Castillo.jpg
Bernal Díaz del Castillo
Tsar Ivan IV of Russia Vasnetsov Ioann 4.jpg
Tsar Ivan IV of Russia
Saint Charles Borromeo Carlo Borromeo.jpg
Saint Charles Borromeo

Related Research Articles

1608 Year

1608 (MDCVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1608th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 608th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1608, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1595 (MDXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1595, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1600 Year

1600 (MDC) was a century leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. It was the last century leap year until the year 2000.

1593 Year

1593 (MDXCIII) was a common year starting on Fridayof the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1593, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1601 Year

1601 (MDCI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1601, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar. This epoch is the beginning of the 400-year Gregorian leap-year cycle within which digital files first existed; the last year of any such cycle is the only leap year whose year number is divisible by 100.

1627 Year

1627 (MDCXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1627th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 627th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1627, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1631 Year

1631 (MDCXXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1631st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 631st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1631, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1565 (MDLXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1591 Year

1591 (MDXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1591, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1590 Year

1590 (MDXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1590, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1589 Year

1589 (MDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1589, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1587 Year

1587 (MDLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1587, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1586 Year

1586 (MDLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1586, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1583 Year

1583 (MDLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1583, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1581 Year

Year 1581 (MDLXXXI of the Julian calendar, and a common year starting on Thursday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1577 Year

Year 1577 (MDLXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1699 Year

1699 (MDCXCIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1699th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 699th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1699, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1693 Year

1693 (MDCXCIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1693rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 693rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1693, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. Ford, L. L. (2004). "Mildmay, Sir Walter (1520/21–1589)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/18696 . Retrieved September 2, 2013.(subscription or UK public library membership required)
  2. Grun, Bernard (1991). The Timetables of History (3rd ed.). New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 259. ISBN   0-671-74919-6.
  3. "Battle of Antwerp | Summary". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  4. Ripley, George; Dana, Charles A. (1873). "Ghent". The American Cyclopaedia. 7. New York: D. Appleton & Co. Retrieved December 4, 2011.