1605

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1605 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1605
MDCV
Ab urbe condita 2358
Armenian calendar 1054
ԹՎ ՌԾԴ
Assyrian calendar 6355
Balinese saka calendar 1526–1527
Bengali calendar 1012
Berber calendar 2555
English Regnal year 2  Ja. 1   3  Ja. 1
Buddhist calendar 2149
Burmese calendar 967
Byzantine calendar 7113–7114
Chinese calendar 甲辰(Wood  Dragon)
4301 or 4241
     to 
乙巳年 (Wood  Snake)
4302 or 4242
Coptic calendar 1321–1322
Discordian calendar 2771
Ethiopian calendar 1597–1598
Hebrew calendar 5365–5366
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1661–1662
 - Shaka Samvat 1526–1527
 - Kali Yuga 4705–4706
Holocene calendar 11605
Igbo calendar 605–606
Iranian calendar 983–984
Islamic calendar 1013–1014
Japanese calendar Keichō 10
(慶長10年)
Javanese calendar 1525–1526
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 3938
Minguo calendar 307 before ROC
民前307年
Nanakshahi calendar 137
Thai solar calendar 2147–2148
Tibetan calendar 阳木龙年
(male Wood-Dragon)
1731 or 1350 or 578
     to 
阴木蛇年
(female Wood-Snake)
1732 or 1351 or 579
The Red Hall, Bourne, England, dating from 1605 The Red Hall, Bourne - geograph.org.uk - 1575134.jpg
The Red Hall, Bourne, England, dating from 1605

1605 ( MDCV ) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar , the 1605th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 605th year of the 2nd millennium , the 5th year of the 17th century , and the 6th year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1605, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Saturday is any non-leap year that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Saturday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is B. Examples include 1977, 1983, 1994, 2005, 2011 and 2022 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2017 and 2023 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in May. Leap years starting on Friday share this characteristic.

Contents

Events

January–June

January 16 is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 349 days remain until the end of the year.

Miguel de Cervantes Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra was a Spanish writer who is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the Spanish language and one of the world's preeminent novelists. His novel Don Quixote has been translated into over 140 languages and dialects; it is, after the Bible, the most-translated book in the world.

Chivalry traditional ideology and code of conduct of knights

Chivalry, or the chivalric code, is an informal, varying code of conduct developed between 1170 and 1220, but never decided on or summarized in a single document. It was associated with the medieval Christian institution of knighthood; knights' and gentlewomen's behaviours were governed by chivalrous social codes. The ideals of chivalry were popularized in medieval literature, especially the Matter of Britain and Matter of France, the former based on Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae, written in the 1130s, which introduced the legend of King Arthur. All of these were taken as historically accurate until the beginnings of modern scholarship in the 19th century.

July–December

July 4 is the 185th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 180 days remain until the end of the year. The Aphelion, the point in the year when the Earth is farthest from the Sun, occurs around this date.

Catholic Church Largest Christian church, led by the Bishop of Rome

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide as of 2017. As the world's oldest continuously functioning international institution, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation. The church is headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the pope. Its central administration, the Holy See, is in the Vatican City, an enclave within the city of Rome in Italy.

Seminary, school of theology, theological seminary, and divinity school are educational institutions for educating students in scripture, theology, generally to prepare them for ordination to serve as clergy, in academics, or in Christian ministry. The English word is taken from the Latin seminarium, translated as seed-bed, an image taken from the Council of Trent document Cum adolescentium aetas which called for the first modern seminaries. In the West, the term now refers to Catholic educational institutes and has widened to include other Christian denominations and American Jewish institutions.

Spanish troops of General Spinola occupy Wachtendonk.

Spanish Empire world empire from the 16th to the 19th century

The Spanish Empire, historically known as the Hispanic Monarchy and as the Catholic Monarchy, was one of the largest empires in history. From the late 15th century to the early 19th, Spain controlled a huge overseas territory in the New World and the Asian archipelago of the Philippines, what they called "The Indies". It also included territories in Europe, Africa and Oceania. The Spanish Empire has been described as the first global empire in history, a description also given to the Portuguese Empire. It was the world's most powerful empire during the 16th and first half of the 17th centuries, reaching its maximum extension in the 18th century. The Spanish Empire was the first empire to be called "the empire on which the sun never sets".

Wachtendonk Place in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Wachtendonk at the confluence of Niers River and Nette River is a municipality in the district of Kleve in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located west of the Rhine half way between Duisburg and Venlo at the Dutch border. Its name means 'bailiff's Donk'.

November 3 is the 307th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 58 days remain until the end of the year.

Jahangir 4th Mughal Emperor (1569–1627)

Nur-ud-din Muhammad Salim, known by his imperial name Jahangir, was the fourth Mughal Emperor, who ruled from 1605 until his death in 1627. His imperial name, means 'conqueror of the world', 'world-conqueror' or 'world-seizer'. The tale of his relationship with the Mughal courtesan, Anarkali, has been widely adapted into the literature, art and cinema of India.

Mughal Empire dynastic empire extending over large parts of the Indian subcontinent

The Mughal Empire, or Mogul Empire, founded in 1526, was an empire that comprised the majority of the Indian subcontinent. It was established and ruled by the Timurid dynasty, with Turco-Mongol Chagatai roots from Central Asia, claiming direct descent from both Genghis Khan and Timur, and with significant Indian Rajput and Persian ancestry through marriage alliances; the first two Mughal emperors had both parents of Central Asian ancestry, while successive emperors were of predominantly Persian and Rajput ancestry. The dynasty was Indo-Persian in culture, combining Persianate culture with local Indian cultural influences visible in its court culture and administrative customs.

Date unknown

Births

Shahryar Shahriyar, Indian School of the 17th century AD.jpg
Shahryar
Federico Ubaldo della Rovere, Duke of Urbino Portrait of Federico Ubaldo della Rovere by Claudio Ridolfi.jpg
Federico Ubaldo della Rovere, Duke of Urbino
Simon Dach Simon Dach.jpg
Simon Dach
Tianqi Emperor Ming Xi Zong Xiang .jpg
Tianqi Emperor

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Approximate date

Deaths

Pope Clement VIII Papst Clemens VIII Italian 17th century.jpg
Pope Clement VIII
Pope Leo XI Leo XI 2.jpg
Pope Leo XI
Ulisse Aldrovandi Ulysse Aldrovandi.jpg
Ulisse Aldrovandi
Theodore Beza Theodore-de-Beze-2.jpg
Theodore Beza

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1626 Year

1626 (MDCXXVI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1626th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 626th year of the 2nd millennium, the 26th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1626, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1623 Year

1623 (MDCXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1623rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 623rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 23rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1623, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1557 Year

Year 1557 (MDLVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1611 Year

1611 (MDCXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1611th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 611th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1611, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1596 Year

1596 (MDXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1596th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 596th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 16th century, and the 7th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1596, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1602 Year

1602 (MDCII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1602nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 602nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1602, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1612 Year

1612 (MDCXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1612th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 612th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1612, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1550 Year

Year 1550 (MDL) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1621 Year

1621 (MDCXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1621st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 621st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1621, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1627 Year

1627 (MDCXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1627th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 627th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1627, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1592 Year

1592 (MDXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1592nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 592nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 16th century, and the 3rd year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1592, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1585 Year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1585th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 585th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1555 Year

Year 1555 (MDLV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1591 Year

1591 (MDXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1591st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 591st year of the 2nd millennium, the 91st year of the 16th century, and the 2nd year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1591, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1589 Year

1589 (MDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1589th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 589th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 16th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1589, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1675 Year

1675 (MDCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1675th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 675th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1675, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1672 Year

1672 (MDCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1672nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 672nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 72nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1672, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1556 Year

Year 1556 (MDLVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

References

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  2. 1 2 Moody, T. W.; et al., eds. (1989). A New History of Ireland. 8: A Chronology of Irish History. Oxford University Press. ISBN   978-0-19-821744-2.
  3. Timeline of History. DK Publishing. 2011. p. 203. ISBN   978-0-7566-8681-9.
  4. "Huguenot Timeline". Genealogy Forum. Armada, Michigan. January 2006. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  5. "Leo XI | pope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved May 6, 2019.