1655

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1655 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1655
MDCLV
Ab urbe condita 2408
Armenian calendar 1104
ԹՎ ՌՃԴ
Assyrian calendar 6405
Balinese saka calendar 1576–1577
Bengali calendar 1062
Berber calendar 2605
English Regnal year 6  Cha. 2   7  Cha. 2
(Interregnum)
Buddhist calendar 2199
Burmese calendar 1017
Byzantine calendar 7163–7164
Chinese calendar 甲午(Wood  Horse)
4351 or 4291
     to 
乙未年 (Wood  Goat)
4352 or 4292
Coptic calendar 1371–1372
Discordian calendar 2821
Ethiopian calendar 1647–1648
Hebrew calendar 5415–5416
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1711–1712
 - Shaka Samvat 1576–1577
 - Kali Yuga 4755–4756
Holocene calendar 11655
Igbo calendar 655–656
Iranian calendar 1033–1034
Islamic calendar 1065–1066
Japanese calendar Jōō 4 / Meireki 1
(明暦元年)
Javanese calendar 1577–1578
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 3988
Minguo calendar 257 before ROC
民前257年
Nanakshahi calendar 187
Thai solar calendar 2197–2198
Tibetan calendar 阳木马年
(male Wood-Horse)
1781 or 1400 or 628
     to 
阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
1782 or 1401 or 629
July 20: The Amsterdam Town Hall is inaugurated. Berckheyde, after - City hall in Amsterdam - 1668-1670.jpg
July 20: The Amsterdam Town Hall is inaugurated.

1655 ( MDCLV ) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar , the 1655th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 655th year of the 2nd millennium , the 55th year of the 17th century , and the 6th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1655, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Friday is any non-leap year that begins on Friday, 1 January, and ends on Friday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is C. The most recent year of such kind was 2010 and the next one will be 2021 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2011 and 2022 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 2100, will also be a common year starting on Friday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in August. Leap years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another one in February.

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Events

March 25: Titan , the largest moon of Saturn, is discovered. Titan multi spectral overlay.jpg
March 25: Titan , the largest moon of Saturn, is discovered.

JanuaryJune

January 5 is the fifth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 360 days remain until the end of the year.

Emperor Go-Sai emperor of Japan

Emperor Go-Sai, also known as Emperor Go-Saiin, was the 111th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Japan Country in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

JulyDecember

July 20 is the 201st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 164 days remain until the end of the year.

Royal Palace of Amsterdam palace in Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Royal Palace of Amsterdam in Amsterdam is one of three palaces in the Netherlands which are at the disposal of the monarch by Act of Parliament. It is situated on the west side of Dam Square in the centre of Amsterdam, opposite the War Memorial and next to the Nieuwe Kerk.

July 27 is the 208th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 157 days remain until the end of the year.

Date unknown

Leiden University Library library

Leiden University Library is a library founded in 1575 in Leiden, Netherlands. It is regarded as a significant place in the development of European culture: it is a part of a small number of cultural centres that gave direction to the development and spread of knowledge during the Enlightenment. This was due particularly to the simultaneous presence of a unique collection of exceptional sources and scholars. Holdings include approximately 5,200,000 volumes, 1,000,000 e-books, 70,000 e-journals, 2,000 current paper journals, 60,000 Oriental and Western manuscripts, 500,000 letters, 100,000 maps, 100,000 prints, 12,000 drawings and 300,000 photographs. The library manages the largest collections worldwide on Indonesia and the Caribbean. Furthermore, Leiden University Library is the only heritage organization in The Netherlands with three registrations of documents in UNESCO's Memory of the World Register.

Births

Pope Innocent XIII InnocientXIII.jpg
Pope Innocent XIII
Charles XI of Sweden Charles XI of Sweden (1691).jpg
Charles XI of Sweden
Isaac van Hoornbeek Hoornbeek.jpg
Isaac van Hoornbeek

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Christian Thomasius German philosopher

Christian Thomasius was a German jurist and philosopher.

1728 Year

1728 (MDCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1728th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 728th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1728, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Deaths

Pope Innocent X Retrato del Papa Inocencio X. Roma, by Diego Velazquez.jpg
Pope Innocent X
Eustache Le Sueur Eustache le sueur.jpg
Eustache Le Sueur
Ukita Hideie Ukita Hideie.jpg
Ukita Hideie

Related Research Articles

1661 Year

1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1661st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 661st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1661, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1662 Year

1662 (MDCLXII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1662nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 662nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1662, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1644 Year

1644 (MDCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1644th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 644th year of the 2nd millennium, the 44th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1644, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once.

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1652 (MDCLII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1652nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 652nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1652, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1657 Year

1657 (MDCLVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1657th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 657th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1657, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1670 Year

1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1670th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 670th year of the 2nd millennium, the 70th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1670, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1592 Year

1592 (MDXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1592nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 592nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 16th century, and the 3rd year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1592, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1585 Year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1585th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 585th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1599 Year

1599 (MDXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1599th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 599th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 16th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1599, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1589 Year

1589 (MDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1589th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 589th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 16th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1589, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1647 Year

1647 (MDCXLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1647th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 647th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1647, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1656 Year

1656 (MDCLVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1656th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 656th year of the 2nd millennium, the 56th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1656, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1658 Year

1658 (MDCLVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1658th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 658th year of the 2nd millennium, the 58th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1658, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1659 Year

1659 (MDCLIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1659th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 659th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1659, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1660 (MDCLX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1660th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 660th year of the 2nd millennium, the 60th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1660, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1663 Year

1663 (MDCLXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1663rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 663rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1663, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1664 Year

1664 (MDCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1664th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 664th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1664, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once.

1669 Year

1669 (MDCLXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1669th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 669th year of the 2nd millennium, the 69th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1669, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1684 Year

1684 (MDCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1684th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 684th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1684, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. Diagne, Léon Sobel, « Le problème de la philosophie africaine » (2004), p. 10 (archived by French Wikipedia)
  2. Kocc Barma Fall disait… [in] Au Senegal (26 Sep 2013)