1656

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1656 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1656
MDCLVI
Ab urbe condita 2409
Armenian calendar 1105
ԹՎ ՌՃԵ
Assyrian calendar 6406
Balinese saka calendar 1577–1578
Bengali calendar 1063
Berber calendar 2606
English Regnal year 7  Cha. 2   8  Cha. 2
(Interregnum)
Buddhist calendar 2200
Burmese calendar 1018
Byzantine calendar 7164–7165
Chinese calendar 乙未(Wood  Goat)
4352 or 4292
     to 
丙申年 (Fire  Monkey)
4353 or 4293
Coptic calendar 1372–1373
Discordian calendar 2822
Ethiopian calendar 1648–1649
Hebrew calendar 5416–5417
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1712–1713
 - Shaka Samvat 1577–1578
 - Kali Yuga 4756–4757
Holocene calendar 11656
Igbo calendar 656–657
Iranian calendar 1034–1035
Islamic calendar 1066–1067
Japanese calendar Meireki 2
(明暦2年)
Javanese calendar 1578–1579
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 3989
Minguo calendar 256 before ROC
民前256年
Nanakshahi calendar 188
Thai solar calendar 2198–2199
Tibetan calendar 阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
1782 or 1401 or 629
     to 
阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1783 or 1402 or 630
July 28-30: Battle of Warsaw. Lemke Skirmish with Polish Tatars.png
July 28 30: Battle of Warsaw.

1656 ( MDCLVI ) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar , the 1656th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 656th year of the 2nd millennium , the 56th year of the 17th century , and the 7th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1656, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year is a calendar year containing an additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Saturday is any year with 366 days that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are BA, such as the years 1820, 1848, 1876, 1916, 1944, 1972, 2000, 2028, 2056, 2084, 2124, 2152, and 2180 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2012 and 2040 in the obsolete Julian calendar. In the Gregorian calendar all centennial leap years start on Saturday; the next such year will be 2400, see below for more.

Contents

Events

January–June

January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 348 days remain until the end of the year.

Treaty of Königsberg (1656) treaty

The Treaty of Königsberg was concluded on 7 January (O.S.) / 17 January (N.S.) 1656 during the Second Northern War. Frederick William I, the "Great Elector" of Brandenburg and duke of Prussia, was forced to join the Swedish camp and became a Swedish vassal for the Duchy of Prussia and Ermland. In a second treaty, negotiated on 24 February 1656 in Königsberg (Królewiec), Frederick William I concluded a defensive alliance with France.

Charles X Gustav of Sweden King of Sweden

Charles X Gustav, also Carl Gustav, was King of Sweden from 1654 until his death. He was the son of John Casimir, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Kleeburg and Catherine of Sweden. After his father's death he also succeeded him as Pfalzgraf. He was married to Hedwig Eleonora of Holstein-Gottorp, who bore his son and successor, Charles XI. Charles X Gustav was the second Wittelsbach king of Sweden after the childless king Christopher of Bavaria (1441–1448) and he was the first king of the Swedish Caroline era, which had its peak during the end of the reign of his son, Charles XI. He led Sweden during the Second Northern War, enlarging the Swedish Empire. By his predecessor Christina, he was considered de facto Duke of Eyland (Öland) before ascending to the Swedish throne.

July–December

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

The Vergulde Draeck was a 41.8-metre (137 ft), 260-tonne (290-ton) ship constructed in 1653 by the Dutch East India Company.

July 27 is the 208th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 157 days remain until the end of the year.

Undated

Stockholm Capital of Sweden

Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and the most populous urban area in the Nordic countries; 965,232 people live in the municipality, approximately 1.6 million in the urban area, and 2.4 million in the metropolitan area. The city stretches across fourteen islands where Lake Mälaren flows into the Baltic Sea. Outside the city to the east, and along the coast, is the island chain of the Stockholm archipelago. The area has been settled since the Stone Age, in the 6th millennium BC, and was founded as a city in 1252 by Swedish statesman Birger Jarl. It is also the county seat of Stockholm County.

Sweden constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Sweden, officially the Kingdom of Sweden, is a country in Northern Europe. It borders Norway to the west and north and Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest by a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund Strait. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the largest country in Northern Europe, the third-largest country in the European Union and the fifth largest country in Europe by area. The capital city is Stockholm. Sweden has a total population of 10.3 million of which 2.5 million have a foreign background. It has a low population density of 22 inhabitants per square kilometre (57/sq mi) and the highest urban concentration is in the central and southern half of the country.

The English fifty shilling coin, worth 50/-, was only ever minted once, in the year 1656. It was a milled gold coin weighing 22.7 grams and with a diameter of 30 millimetres. Only eleven examples are known to survive. One extremely fine specimen was recorded to have been sold for £15,250 in May 1989.

Births

Duchess Johanna Magdalena of Saxe-Altenburg Johanna Magdalena von Sachsen-Altenburg.jpg
Duchess Johanna Magdalena of Saxe-Altenburg
Jan Frans van Douven Jan Frans van Douven 006.jpg
Jan Frans van Douven
Ulrika Eleonora of Denmark Ulrica Eleanor of Sweden (1680) 1677 by Jacques D'Agar.jpg
Ulrika Eleonora of Denmark
Edmond Halley Edmond Halley 072.jpg
Edmond Halley
William Fleetwood Anglican bishop

William Fleetwood was an English preacher, Bishop of St Asaph and Bishop of Ely, remembered by economists and statisticians for constructing a price index in his Chronicon Preciosum of 1707.

1723 Year

1723 (MDCCXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1723rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 723rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 23rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1723, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 363 days remain until the end of the year.

Deaths

Jan van Goyen Terborch Goyenuv portret.jpg
Jan van Goyen
John IV of Portugal Rubens John, Duke of Braganza.jpg
John IV of Portugal

Related Research Articles

1661 Year

1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1661st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 661st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1661, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1595 (MDXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1595, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1652 (MDCLII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1652nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 652nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1652, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1611 Year

1611 (MDCXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1611th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 611th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1611, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1593 Year

1593 (MDXCIII) was a common year starting on Fridayof the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1593, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1596 Year

1596 (MDXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1596, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1612 Year

1612 (MDCXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1612th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 612th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1612, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1621 Year

1621 (MDCXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1621st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 621st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1621, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1592 Year

1592 (MDXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1592, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1746 Year

1746 (MDCCXLVI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1746th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 746th year of the 2nd millennium, the 46th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1746, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1722 Year

1722 (MDCCXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1722nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 722nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 22nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1722, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1710 Year

1710 (MDCCX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1710th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 710th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1710, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Saturday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1655 Year

1655 (MDCLV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1655th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 655th year of the 2nd millennium, the 55th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1655, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1599 Year

1599 (MDXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1599, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1660 (MDCLX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1660th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 660th year of the 2nd millennium, the 60th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1660, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1702 (MDCCII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1702nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 702nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1702, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Wednesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1693 Year

1693 (MDCXCIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1693rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 693rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1693, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1686 Year

1686 (MDCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1686th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 686th year of the 2nd millennium, the 86th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1686, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. Eisinger, J. (July 1982). "Lead and wine: Eberhard Gockel and the colica Pictonum". Medical History. 26 (3): 279–302. doi:10.1017/s0025727300041508. ISSN   0025-7273. PMC   1139187 . PMID   6750289.
  2. Risse, Guenter B. (2005). New Medical Challenges During the Scottish Enlightenment. Amsterdam: Rodopi. p. 207. ISBN   90-420-1814-3 . Retrieved March 6, 2009.
  3. Rosen, George (1943). The History of Miners' Diseases: a medical and social interpretation (book preview). Schuman's. p. 10. Retrieved March 6, 2009.