1688

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1688 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1688
MDCLXXXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2441
Armenian calendar 1137
ԹՎ ՌՃԼԷ
Assyrian calendar 6438
Balinese saka calendar 1609–1610
Bengali calendar 1095
Berber calendar 2638
English Regnal year 3  Ja. 2   1  Will.  &  Mar.
Buddhist calendar 2232
Burmese calendar 1050
Byzantine calendar 7196–7197
Chinese calendar 丁卯年 (Fire  Rabbit)
4384 or 4324
     to 
戊辰年 (Earth  Dragon)
4385 or 4325
Coptic calendar 1404–1405
Discordian calendar 2854
Ethiopian calendar 1680–1681
Hebrew calendar 5448–5449
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1744–1745
 - Shaka Samvat 1609–1610
 - Kali Yuga 4788–4789
Holocene calendar 11688
Igbo calendar 688–689
Iranian calendar 1066–1067
Islamic calendar 1099–1100
Japanese calendar Jōkyō 5 / Genroku 1
(元禄元年)
Javanese calendar 1611–1612
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 4021
Minguo calendar 224 before ROC
民前224年
Nanakshahi calendar 220
Thai solar calendar 2230–2231
Tibetan calendar 阴火兔年
(female Fire-Rabbit)
1814 or 1433 or 661
     to 
阳土龙年
(male Earth-Dragon)
1815 or 1434 or 662

1688 (MDCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1688th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 688th year of the 2nd millennium, the 88th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1688, the Gregorian calendar was 10days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

November 15: The Glorious Revolution begins. Prince of Orange engraving by William Miller after Turner R739.jpg
November 15: The Glorious Revolution begins.

Events

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Births

Emanuel Swedenborg Emanuel Swedenborg.PNG
Emanuel Swedenborg

Deaths

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Ferdinand Verbiest
James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormond James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde by William Wissing.jpg
James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormond

Related Research Articles

1690 Calendar year

1690 (MDCXC) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1690th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 690th year of the 2nd millennium, the 90th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1690, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1680s Decade in the 17th Century

The 1680s decade ran from January 1, 1680, to December 31, 1689.

1680 Calendar year

1680 (MDCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1680th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 680th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1680, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1685 Calendar year

1685 (MDCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1685th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 685th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1685, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1677 Calendar year

1677 (MDCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1677th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 677th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1677, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1610 Calendar year

1610 (MDCX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1610th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 610th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1610, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1619 Calendar year

1619 (MDCXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1619th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 619th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1619, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1689 Calendar year

1689 (MDCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1689th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 689th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1689, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1647 Calendar year

1647 (MDCXLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1647th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 647th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1647, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1664 Calendar year

1664 (MDCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1664th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 664th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1664, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1682 Calendar year

1682 (MDCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1682nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 682nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 82nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1682, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1681 Calendar year

1681 (MDCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1681st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 681st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1681, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1674 Calendar year

1674 (MDCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1674th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 674th year of the 2nd millennium, the 74th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1674, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1672 Calendar year

1672 (MDCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1672nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 672nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 72nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1672, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1547 Calendar year

Year 1547 (MDXLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Narai 27th monarch of the Ayutthaya Kingdom (1656-88)

King Narai the Great or Ramathibodi III was the 27th monarch of Ayutthaya Kingdom, the 4th and last monarch of the Prasat Thong dynasty. He was the king of Ayutthaya Kingdom from 1656 to 1688 and arguably the most famous king of the Prasat Thong dynasty.

Constantine Phaulkon Greek adventurer (1647–1688)

Constantine Phaulkon was a Greek adventurer who became the prime counsellor to King Narai of Ayutthaya and assumed the Thai noble title Chao PhrayaWichayen (เจ้าพระยาวิชาเยนทร์).

France–Thailand relations Bilateral relations

France–Thailand relations cover a period from the 16th century until modern times. Relations started in earnest during the reign of Louis XIV of France with numerous reciprocal embassies and a major attempt by France to Christianize the kingdom of Thailand and establish a French protectorate, which failed when the country revolted against foreign intrusions in 1688. France would only return more than a century and a half later as a modernised colonial power, engaging in a struggle for territory and influence against Thailand in mainland Southeast Asia that would last until the 20th century.

Siamese revolution of 1688 1688 anti-French uprising in the Ayutthaya Kingdom; new dynasty established

The Siamese revolution of 1688 was a major popular upheaval in the Siamese Ayutthaya Kingdom which led to the overthrow of the pro-French Siamese king Narai. The Mandarin Phetracha, previously one of Narai's trusted military advisors, took advantage of the elderly Narai's illness, and killed Narai's Christian heir, along with a number of missionaries and Narai's influential foreign minister the Greek adventurer Constantine Phaulkon. Phetracha then married Narai's daughter, took the throne, and pursued a policy of ousting French influence and military forces from Siam. One of the most prominent battles was 1688's Siege of Bangkok, when tens of thousands of Siamese forces spent four months besieging a French fortress within the city. As a consequence of the revolution, Siam severed significant ties with the West, with the exception of the Dutch East India Company, until the 19th century.

The Anglo-Siamese War was a brief state of war that existed between the English East India Company and Kingdom of Siam in 1687–88. Siam officially declared war against the Company in August 1687. No peace treaty was ever signed to end the war, but the Siamese revolution of 1688 rendered the issue moot.

References

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  2. Israel, Jonathan Irvine (October 30, 2003). The Anglo-Dutch Moment: Essays on the Glorious Revolution and Its World Impact by Jonathan Irvine Israel. ISBN   9780521544061.
  3. Kelly, Billy (2009). "THE GUILDHALL: Derry's Museum in Glass". History Ireland. 17 (6): 66–69. JSTOR   40588462.
  4. "Ulrika Eleonora | queen of Sweden". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved April 17, 2019.
  5. Sr, Arthur W. Hummel (January 1, 2018). Eminent Chinese of the Qing Period: 1644-1911/2. Berkshire Publishing Group. p. 705. ISBN   978-1-61472-849-8.