1708

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1708 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1708
MDCCVIII
Ab urbe condita 2461
Armenian calendar 1157
ԹՎ ՌՃԾԷ
Assyrian calendar 6458
Balinese saka calendar 1629–1630
Bengali calendar 1115
Berber calendar 2658
British Regnal year 6  Ann. 1   7  Ann. 1
Buddhist calendar 2252
Burmese calendar 1070
Byzantine calendar 7216–7217
Chinese calendar 丁亥(Fire  Pig)
4404 or 4344
     to 
戊子年 (Earth  Rat)
4405 or 4345
Coptic calendar 1424–1425
Discordian calendar 2874
Ethiopian calendar 1700–1701
Hebrew calendar 5468–5469
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1764–1765
 - Shaka Samvat 1629–1630
 - Kali Yuga 4808–4809
Holocene calendar 11708
Igbo calendar 708–709
Iranian calendar 1086–1087
Islamic calendar 1119–1120
Japanese calendar Hōei 5
(宝永5年)
Javanese calendar 1631–1632
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4041
Minguo calendar 204 before ROC
民前204年
Nanakshahi calendar 240
Thai solar calendar 2250–2251
Tibetan calendar 阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
1834 or 1453 or 681
     to 
阳土鼠年
(male Earth-Rat)
1835 or 1454 or 682
September 28: Battle of Lesnaya. Battle of Lesnaya 1708 by Larmessin.jpg
September 28: Battle of Lesnaya.

1708 (MDCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1708th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 708th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1708, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

In the Swedish calendar it was a leap year starting on Wednesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

Events

JanuaryJune

JulyDecember

Date unknown

Births

William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham after Richard Brompton.jpg
William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham

Deaths

Guru Gobind Singh Guru Gobind Singh.jpg
Guru Gobind Singh

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1648 1648

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1728 1728

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1644 1644

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1582 1582

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1680 1680

1680 (MDCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1680th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 680th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1680, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1636 1636

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1611 1611

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1630 1630

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1638 1638

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1639 1639

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1592 1592

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1722 1722

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1710 1710

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1651 1651

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1712 1712

1712 (MDCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1712th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 712th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1712, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1700 1700

1700 (MDCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1700th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 700th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1700, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1692 1692

1692 (MDCXCII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1692nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 692nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1692, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The year 1708 in science and technology involved some significant events.

References

  1. 1 2 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p.  292. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  2. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 205–206. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  3. "Stamps celebrate St Paul's with Wren epitaph". Evening Standard. Archived from the original on May 19, 2008. Retrieved June 5, 2008.
  4. Landow, George P. (2010). "The British East India Company — the Company that Owned a Nation (or Two)". The Victorian Web. Retrieved November 22, 2011.