1711

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1711 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1711
MDCCXI
Ab urbe condita 2464
Armenian calendar 1160
ԹՎ ՌՃԿ
Assyrian calendar 6461
Balinese saka calendar 1632–1633
Bengali calendar 1118
Berber calendar 2661
British Regnal year 9  Ann. 1   10  Ann. 1
Buddhist calendar 2255
Burmese calendar 1073
Byzantine calendar 7219–7220
Chinese calendar 庚寅年 (Metal  Tiger)
4407 or 4347
     to 
辛卯年 (Metal  Rabbit)
4408 or 4348
Coptic calendar 1427–1428
Discordian calendar 2877
Ethiopian calendar 1703–1704
Hebrew calendar 5471–5472
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1767–1768
 - Shaka Samvat 1632–1633
 - Kali Yuga 4811–4812
Holocene calendar 11711
Igbo calendar 711–712
Iranian calendar 1089–1090
Islamic calendar 1122–1123
Japanese calendar Hōei 8 / Shōtoku 1
(正徳元年)
Javanese calendar 1634–1635
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4044
Minguo calendar 201 before ROC
民前201年
Nanakshahi calendar 243
Thai solar calendar 2253–2254
Tibetan calendar 阳金虎年
(male Iron-Tiger)
1837 or 1456 or 684
     to 
阴金兔年
(female Iron-Rabbit)
1838 or 1457 or 685
July 21: The Treaty of the Pruth is signed. Prut river.jpg
July 21: The Treaty of the Pruth is signed.

1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1711th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 711th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1711, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Tuesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

Charles Sackville, 2nd Duke of Dorset born 6 February Charles Sackville, 2nd duke of Dorset by Rosalba Carriera.jpg
Charles Sackville, 2nd Duke of Dorset born 6 February
Samuel Gotthold Lange born 22 March Samuel Gotthold Lange.jpg
Samuel Gotthold Lange born 22 March
Paul II Anton, Prince Esterhazy born 22 April Paul II. Anton Ksiaze Esterhazy.jpg
Paul II Anton, Prince Esterházy born 22 April
Eleazar Wheelock born 22 April Eleazar Wheelock.jpg
Eleazar Wheelock born 22 April
Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont born 26 April Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont.jpg
Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont born 26 April
David Hume born 26 April Painting of David Hume.jpg
David Hume born 26 April
Daniel Lienard de Beaujeu born 19 August Daniel-Hyancinthe-Marie Lienard de Beaujeu.jpg
Daniel Liénard de Beaujeu born 19 August
Henry Muhlenberg born 6 September Henry Muhlenberg.jpg
Henry Muhlenberg born 6 September
Charles Holmes (Royal Navy officer) born 19 September Rear-Admiral Charles Holmes (1711-1761), by British School of the 18th century.jpg
Charles Holmes (Royal Navy officer) born 19 September
Qianlong Emperor born 25 September Qing Lang Shi Zhu Hui <<Qing Gao Zong Gan Long Di Zhao Fu Xiang >> .jpg
Qianlong Emperor born 25 September
Daniel Parke Custis born 15 October DANIEL PARKE CUSTIS (1711-1757).jpg
Daniel Parke Custis born 15 October
Robert Hay Drummond born 10 November Joshua Reynolds - Robert Hay Drummond.jpg
Robert Hay Drummond born 10 November

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Deaths

Joseph Vaz Joze-Vaz.jpg
Joseph Vaz
Louis, Grand Dauphin Hyacinthe Rigaud - Louis de France, Dauphin (1661-1711), dit le Grand Dauphin - Google Art Project.jpg
Louis, Grand Dauphin

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1707</span> Calendar year

1707 (MDCCVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1707th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 707th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1707, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1700s (decade)</span> Decade of the Gregorian Calendar (1700–1709)

The 1700s decade ran from January 1, 1700, to December 31, 1709.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1691</span> Calendar year

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The 1630s was a decade that began on January 1, 1630, and ended on December 31, 1639.

The 1710s decade ran from January 1, 1710 to December 31, 1719.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1627</span> Calendar year

1627 (MDCXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1627th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 627th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1627, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1710</span> Calendar year

1710 (MDCCX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1710th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 710th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1710, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1714</span> Calendar year

1714 (MDCCXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1714th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 714th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1714, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1663</span> Calendar year

1663 (MDCLXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1663rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 663rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1663, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1715</span> Calendar year

1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1715th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 715th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1715, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1713</span> Calendar year

1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1713th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 713th year of the 2nd millennium, the 13th year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1713, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1712</span> Calendar year

1712 (MDCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1712th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 712th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1712, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1702</span> Calendar year

1702 (MDCCII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1702nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 702nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1702, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1704</span> Calendar year

1704 (MDCCIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1704th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 704th year of the 2nd millennium, the 4th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1704, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1699</span> Calendar year

1699 (MDCXCIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1699th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 699th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1699, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1694</span> Calendar year

1694 (MDCXCIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1694th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 694th year of the 2nd millennium, the 94th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1694, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1692</span> Calendar year

1692 (MDCXCII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1692nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 692nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1692, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History . London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  2. Information Britain.
  3. Ross, David (2002). Chronology of Scottish History. New Lanark: Geddes & Grosset. ISBN   1-85534-380-0.
  4. "1700-tallet: Introduktion" (in Danish). Øresundstid. Retrieved September 13, 2013.
  5. C. Wingate Reed (1962). Beaufort County: Two Centuries of Its History. p. 63.
  6. David R. Jones (1978). The Military-naval Encyclopedia of Russia and the Soviet Union. Academic International Press. p. 13.
  7. "Royal Charters, Privy Council website". Archived from the original on August 24, 2007. Retrieved August 24, 2007.
  8. "William IV | prince of Orange and Nassau". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved August 23, 2020.