1718

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1718 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1718
MDCCXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2471
Armenian calendar 1167
ԹՎ ՌՃԿԷ
Assyrian calendar 6468
Balinese saka calendar 1639–1640
Bengali calendar 1125
Berber calendar 2668
British Regnal year 4  Geo. 1   5  Geo. 1
Buddhist calendar 2262
Burmese calendar 1080
Byzantine calendar 7226–7227
Chinese calendar 丁酉(Fire  Rooster)
4414 or 4354
     to 
戊戌年 (Earth  Dog)
4415 or 4355
Coptic calendar 1434–1435
Discordian calendar 2884
Ethiopian calendar 1710–1711
Hebrew calendar 5478–5479
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1774–1775
 - Shaka Samvat 1639–1640
 - Kali Yuga 4818–4819
Holocene calendar 11718
Igbo calendar 718–719
Iranian calendar 1096–1097
Islamic calendar 1130–1131
Japanese calendar Kyōhō 3
(享保3年)
Javanese calendar 1641–1643
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4051
Minguo calendar 194 before ROC
民前194年
Nanakshahi calendar 250
Thai solar calendar 2260–2261
Tibetan calendar 阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1844 or 1463 or 691
     to 
阳土狗年
(male Earth-Dog)
1845 or 1464 or 692
August 11: Battle of Cape Passaro The Battle of Cape Passaro.jpg
August 11: Battle of Cape Passaro

1718 ( MDCCXVIII ) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar , the 1718th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 718th year of the 2nd millennium , the 18th year of the 18th century , and the 9th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1718, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Saturday is any non-leap year that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Saturday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is B. The most recent year of such kind was 2011 and the next one will be 2022 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2017 and 2023 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in May. Leap years starting on Friday share this characteristic.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the first of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Year's Day. It is, on average, the coldest month of the year within most of the Northern Hemisphere and the warmest month of the year within most of the Southern Hemisphere. In the Southern hemisphere, January is the seasonal equivalent of July in the Northern hemisphere and vice versa.

War of the Quadruple Alliance war (1717–1720) between Spain and the Quadruple Alliance (Britain, France, Austria, the Dutch Republic), resulting in Quadruple Alliance victory and the Treaty of The Hague

The War of the Quadruple Alliance (1718-1720) was caused by Spanish attempts to regain territorial losses in Italy agreed in the 1713 Peace of Utrecht. Spain recaptured Sardinia in 1717 without opposition but when followed by landing on Sicily in July 1718, it led to the formation of the Quadruple Alliance on 2 August 1718, comprising Britain, France, Emperor Charles VI and the Dutch Republic.

May is the fifth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the third of seven months to have a length of 31 days.

May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 238 days remaining until the end of the year.

New Orleans Largest city in Louisiana

New Orleans is a consolidated city-parish located along the Mississippi River in the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Louisiana. With an estimated population of 393,292 in 2017, it is the most populous city in Louisiana. A major port, New Orleans is considered an economic and commercial hub for the broader Gulf Coast region of the United States.

New France Area colonized by France in North America

New France was the area colonized by France in North America during a period beginning with the exploration of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534 and ending with the cession of New France to Great Britain and Spain in 1763 under the Treaty of Paris (1763).

JulyDecember

May 7: New Orleans New Orleans PD 1.jpg
May 7: New Orleans

July 21 is the 202nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 163 days remaining until the end of the year.

Treaty of Passarowitz peace treaty

The Treaty of Passarowitz or Treaty of Požarevac was the peace treaty signed in Požarevac, a town in the Ottoman Empire, on 21 July 1718 between the Ottoman Empire on one side and Austria of the Habsburg Monarchy and the Republic of Venice on the other.

August 11 is the 223rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 142 days remaining until the end of the year.

Date unknown

Makk, also spelled mak, mek or meek, is a title formerly used in the Sudan, meaning "ruler" or "king". There are three theories of its origins. It may be a corruption of the Arabic word malik, meaning "king"; it may descend from Meroitic mk, meaning "God", appropriate to the divine kingship practised in the Sudan; or, as E. A. Wallis Budge proposed, it may be derived from Ge'ez መከሐ (mkḥ), meaning "to be glorious", making it an Ethiopian import. The territory ruled by a makk may be called a "makkdom" or "mekdom" in English.

New England Region of the United States

New England is a geographical and cultural region composed of six states of the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec to the northeast and north, respectively. The Atlantic Ocean is to the east and southeast, and Long Island Sound is to the south. Boston is New England's largest city as well as the capital of Massachusetts. The largest metropolitan area is Greater Boston with nearly a third of the entire region's population, which also includes Worcester, Massachusetts, Manchester, New Hampshire, and Providence, Rhode Island.

Coffee Brewed beverage

Coffee is a brewed drink prepared from roasted coffee beans, the seeds of berries from certain Coffea species. The genus Coffea is native to tropical Africa and Madagascar, the Comoros, Mauritius, and Réunion in the Indian Ocean. Coffee plants are now cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in the equatorial regions of the Americas, Southeast Asia, Indian subcontinent, and Africa. The two most commonly grown are C. arabica and C. robusta. Once ripe, coffee berries are picked, processed, and dried. Dried coffee seeds are roasted to varying degrees, depending on the desired flavor. Roasted beans are ground and then brewed with near-boiling water to produce the beverage known as coffee.

Births

Infanta Mariana Victoria of Spain Mariana Victoria de Borbon y Farnesio, Reina consorte de Portugal.jpg
Infanta Mariana Victoria of Spain

January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 358 days remaining until the end of the year.

Israel Putnam American Revolutionary War general

Israel Putnam was an American army general officer, popularly known as Old Put, who fought with distinction at the Battle of Bunker Hill (1775) during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). His courage and fighting spirit became known far beyond Connecticut's borders through the circulation of folk legends in the American colonies and states celebrating his exploits.

1790 Year

1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1790th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 790th year of the 2nd millennium, the 90th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1790, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Deaths

Mary of Modena Mary of Modena Pietersz.jpg
Mary of Modena
Charles XII of Sweden Karl XII 1706.jpg
Charles XII of Sweden

Related Research Articles

Blackbeard English pirate

Edward Teach or Edward Thatch, better known as Blackbeard, was an English pirate who operated around the West Indies and the eastern coast of Britain's North American colonies. Little is known about his early life, but he may have been a sailor on privateer ships during Queen Anne's War before settling on the Bahamian island of New Providence, a base for Captain Benjamin Hornigold, whose crew Teach joined around 1716. Hornigold placed him in command of a sloop that he had captured, and the two engaged in numerous acts of piracy. Their numbers were boosted by the addition to their fleet of two more ships, one of which was commanded by Stede Bonnet; but Hornigold retired from piracy towards the end of 1717, taking two vessels with him.

1720 Year

1720 (MDCCXX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1720th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 720th year of the 2nd millennium, the 20th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1720, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The 1710s decade ran from January 1, 1710 to December 31, 1719.

1716 Year

1716 (MDCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1716th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 716th year of the 2nd millennium, the 16th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1716, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1717 Year

1717 (MDCCXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1717th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 717th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1717, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1719 Year

1719 (MDCCXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1719th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 719th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1719, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Gulf of Honduras A large inlet of the Caribbean Sea, indenting the coasts of Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras.

The Gulf or Bay of Honduras is a large inlet of the Caribbean Sea, indenting the coasts of Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras. From north to south, it runs for approximately 200 km from Dangriga, Belize, to La Ceiba, Honduras.

Stede Bonnet early 18th-century Barbadian pirate

Stede Bonnet was an early eighteenth-century Barbadian pirate, sometimes called "The Gentleman Pirate" because he was a moderately wealthy land-owner before turning to a life of crime. Bonnet was born into a wealthy English family on the island of Barbados, and inherited the family estate after his father's death in 1694. In 1709, he married Mary Allamby, and engaged in some level of militia service. Because of marital problems, and despite his lack of sailing experience, Bonnet decided he should turn to piracy in the summer of 1717. He bought a sailing vessel, named it Revenge, and travelled with his paid crew along the Eastern Seaboard of what is now the United States, capturing other vessels and burning other Barbadian ships.

William Rhett British-born plantation owner

Colonel William Rhett was a British-born plantation owner in the Province of Carolina in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He arrived in America in 1694, accompanied by his wife Sarah. Rhett quickly became a prominent rice farmer and member of the South Carolina Assembly.

See also: 1716 in piracy, other events in 1717, 1718 in piracy, and Timeline of piracy.


See also 1717 in piracy, 1719 in piracy, and Timeline of piracy.

Israel Hands was an 18th-century pirate, also known as Basilica Hands. He is best known for being second in command to the infamous pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard.

<i>Blackbeard</i> (musical) musical

Blackbeard, or officially, Blackbeard: The Musical or Blackbeard: A New Musical, is a musical created by Rob Gardner. The plot focuses on the notorious pirate Edward "Blackbeard" Teach, and his blockade of Charles Town in South Carolina in 1718. The musical portrays Blackbeard as a compassionate person, who's deeply in love with a woman on his ship named Mary Ormond. Blackbeard struggles to maintain his fierce façade, while at the same time trying to win the heart of the pacifistic Mary.

Battle of Cape Fear River (1718) battle fought in September 1718

The Battle of Cape Fear River, or the Battle of the Sandbars, was fought in September 1718 between a British naval expedition from the Province of South Carolina against the pirate ships of Stede Bonnet. British forces defeated the pirates in the Cape Fear River estuary which led to Bonnet's death by hanging in Charleston.

Ignatius Pell was a pirate who served as the boatswain to Captain Stede Bonnet aboard the Royal James, a ship previously named Revenge. He was arrested in October 1718 and testified against his crew and captain.

David Herriot was a ship’s master and pirate best known for serving under Blackbeard and Stede Bonnet.

John Cole was a pirate active off the American eastern seaboard. His brief career is associated with Richard Worley and William Moody. He is known more for the unusual cargo of his pirate ship than for his piracy.

Francis Demont was a pirate active in the Caribbean. His trial was important in establishing Admiralty law in South Carolina.

Richard Tookerman was born May 16, 1691 in Devon, Cornwall, England. He was the son of Josias Tookerman, a clergyman, and younger brother of Josias Tookerman II, a clergyman sent by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG) to Jamaica. He married Katherine Grant, widow of John Grant of Charleston, South Carolina by 1717. As a pirate, smuggler, and trader active in the Caribbean and the Carolinas, he became best known for involvement with pirates Stede Bonnet and Bartholomew Roberts.

Daniel Porter was a pirate and trader active in the Caribbean. He is best known for his associations with Benjamin Hornigold and Bartholomew Roberts.

References

  1. "Historical Events for Year 1718 | OnThisDay.com". Historyorb.com. Retrieved 2018-04-04.
  2. Wild, Antony (2005). Coffee: A Dark History . ISBN   978-0-393-06071-3.