1718

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1718 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1718
MDCCXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2471
Armenian calendar 1167
ԹՎ ՌՃԿԷ
Assyrian calendar 6468
Balinese saka calendar 1639–1640
Bengali calendar 1125
Berber calendar 2668
British Regnal year 4  Geo. 1   5  Geo. 1
Buddhist calendar 2262
Burmese calendar 1080
Byzantine calendar 7226–7227
Chinese calendar 丁酉(Fire  Rooster)
4414 or 4354
     to 
戊戌年 (Earth  Dog)
4415 or 4355
Coptic calendar 1434–1435
Discordian calendar 2884
Ethiopian calendar 1710–1711
Hebrew calendar 5478–5479
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1774–1775
 - Shaka Samvat 1639–1640
 - Kali Yuga 4818–4819
Holocene calendar 11718
Igbo calendar 718–719
Iranian calendar 1096–1097
Islamic calendar 1130–1131
Japanese calendar Kyōhō 3
(享保3年)
Javanese calendar 1641–1643
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4051
Minguo calendar 194 before ROC
民前194年
Nanakshahi calendar 250
Thai solar calendar 2260–2261
Tibetan calendar 阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1844 or 1463 or 691
     to 
阳土狗年
(male Earth-Dog)
1845 or 1464 or 692
August 11: Battle of Cape Passaro The Battle of Cape Passaro.jpg
August 11: Battle of Cape Passaro

1718 (MDCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1718th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 718th year of the 2nd millennium, the 18th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1718, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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April June

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May 7: New Orleans

October December

Date unknown

Births

Infanta Mariana Victoria of Spain Mariana Victoria de Borbon y Farnesio, Reina consorte de Portugal.jpg
Infanta Mariana Victoria of Spain

Deaths

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Mary of Modena
Charles XII of Sweden Karl XII 1706.jpg
Charles XII of Sweden

Related Research Articles

Blackbeard English pirate (1680–1718)

Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, was an English pirate who operated around the West Indies and the eastern coast of Britain's North American colonies. Little is known about his early life, but he may have been a sailor on privateer ships during Queen Anne's War before he settled on the Bahamian island of New Providence, a base for Captain Benjamin Hornigold, whose crew Teach joined around 1716. Hornigold placed him in command of a sloop that he had captured, and the two engaged in numerous acts of piracy. Their numbers were boosted by the addition to their fleet of two more ships, one of which was commanded by Stede Bonnet; but Hornigold retired from piracy toward the end of 1717, taking two vessels with him.

1660 (MDCLX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1660th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 660th year of the 2nd millennium, the 60th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1660, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1717 Calendar year

1717 (MDCCXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1717th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 717th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1717, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Captain Benjamin Hornigold (1680–1719) was an English pirate who operated during the tail end of the Golden Age of Piracy.

Stede Bonnet Early 18th-century Barbadian pirate

Stede Bonnet was an early eighteenth-century Barbadian pirate, sometimes called "The Gentleman Pirate" because he was a moderately wealthy land-owner before turning to a life of crime. Bonnet was born into a wealthy English family on the island of Barbados, and inherited the family estate after his father's death in 1694. In 1709, he married Mary Allamby, and engaged in some level of militia service. Because of marital problems, and despite his lack of sailing experience, Bonnet decided he should turn to piracy in the summer of 1717. He bought a sailing vessel, named it Revenge, and travelled with his paid crew along the Eastern Seaboard of what is now the United States, capturing other vessels and burning other Barbadian ships.

<i>Queen Annes Revenge</i> Pirate Blackbeards ship

Queen Anne's Revenge was an early-18th-century ship, most famously used as a flagship by Edward Teach, better known by his nickname Blackbeard. Although the date and place of the ship's construction are uncertain, it was originally believed she was built for merchant service in Bristol, England in 1710 and named Concord, later captured by French privateers and renamed La Concorde. After several years' service with the French, she was captured by Blackbeard in 1717. Blackbeard used the ship for less than a year, but captured numerous prizes using her as his flagship.

William Rhett British-born plantation owner

Colonel William Rhett was a British-born plantation owner in the Province of Carolina in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He arrived in America in 1694, accompanied by his wife Sarah. Rhett quickly became a prominent rice farmer and member of the South Carolina Assembly.

See also 1717 in piracy, 1719 in piracy, and Timeline of piracy.

Israel Hands, also known as Basilica Hands, was an eighteenth-century pirate best known for being second in command to Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard. His name serves as the basis for the name of the villainous sidekick Israel Hands in Robert Louis Stevenson's 1883 novel Treasure Island; other than this, the fictional character has no other connection to the historical person.

Battle of Cape Fear River (1718)

The Battle of Cape Fear River, or the Battle of the Sandbars, was fought in September 1718 between a British naval expedition from the Province of South Carolina against the pirate ships of Stede Bonnet. British forces defeated the pirates in the Cape Fear River estuary which led to Bonnet's eventual death by hanging in Charleston.

Ignatius Pell was a pirate who served as the boatswain to Captain Stede Bonnet aboard the Royal James, a ship previously named Revenge. He was arrested in October 1718 and testified against his crew and captain.

Republic of Pirates Republic established by pirates in the Bahamas in the early 18th century

The Republic of Pirates was the base or stronghold of a loose confederacy run by privateers-turned-pirates in Nassau on New Providence island in the Bahamas for about eleven years from 1706 until 1718. While it was not a republic in a formal sense, it was governed by an informal pirate code, which dictated that the crews of the Republic would vote on the leadership of their ships and treat other pirate crews with civility.

David Herriot was a ship’s master and pirate best known for serving under Blackbeard and Stede Bonnet.

Flying Gang Group of Pirates in 18th Century

The Flying Gang was an 18th-century group of pirates who established themselves in Nassau, New Providence in The Bahamas after the destruction of Port Royal in Jamaica. The gang consisted of the most notorious and cunning pirates of the time, buccaneers who terrorized and pillaged the Caribbean until the Royal Navy and infighting brought them to justice. They achieved great fame and wealth by raiding salvagers attempting to recover gold from the sunken Spanish treasure fleet. They established their own codes and governed themselves independent from any of the colonial powers of the time. Nassau was deemed the Republic of Pirates as it attracted many former Privateers looking for work to its shores. The Governor of Bermuda stated that there were over 1000 pirates in Nassau at that time and that they outnumbered the mere hundred inhabitants in the town.

Lieutenant Richards was a pirate active in the Caribbean and off the Carolinas. He is best known for sailing alongside Blackbeard.

Francis Demont was a pirate active in the Caribbean. His trial was important in establishing Admiralty law in South Carolina.

Richard Tookerman was born May 16, 1691 in Devon, Cornwall, England. He was the son of Josias Tookerman, a clergyman, and younger brother of Josias Tookerman II, a clergyman sent by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG) to Jamaica. He married Katherine Grant, widow of John Grant of Charleston, South Carolina by 1717. As a pirate, smuggler, and trader active in the Caribbean and the Carolinas, he became best known for involvement with pirates Stede Bonnet and Bartholomew Roberts.

Daniel Porter was a pirate and trader active in the Caribbean. He is best known for his associations with Benjamin Hornigold and Bartholomew Roberts.

Proclamation for Suppressing of Pirates

The Proclamation for Suppressing of Pirates was issued by George I of Great Britain on 5 September 1717. It promised a royal pardon for acts of piracy committed before the following 5 January to those pirates who surrendered themselves to the correct authority before a deadline. Originally, the surrender had to occur on or before 5 September 1718; this was later extended by a second proclamation to 1 July 1719.

References

  1. Motilal Jotwani, Sufis Of Sindh (Indian Ministry of Information & Broadcasting, 1986)
  2. Demetrius Kiminas, The Ecumenical Patriarchate (Wildside Press LLC, 2009) p. 41,47
  3. Alisa LaGamma, Kongo: Power and Majesty (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2015) p.15
  4. W. M. Thackeray, The History of Henry Esmond, Esq., A Colonel in the Service of Her Majesty Queen Anne (Houghton Mifflin, 1900) p. 73, 490
  5. Harold Acton, The Last Medici (Macmillan, 1980) p. 172
  6. "Historical Events for Year 1718 | OnThisDay.com". Historyorb.com. Retrieved April 4, 2018.
  7. Angus Konstam, The Pirate World: A History of the Most Notorious Sea (Bloomsbury, 2019)
  8. "The Last Days of Blackbeard", By Colin Woodard, Smithsonian magazine (February 2014)
  9. Kadriorg Palace – Tallinn, Estonia – Spotting History
  10. Robert Baldick, The Duel: A History of Dueling (Spring Books, 1970)
  11. Wild, Antony (2005). Coffee: A Dark History . ISBN   978-0-393-06071-3.