1720

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1720 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1720
MDCCXX
Ab urbe condita 2473
Armenian calendar 1169
ԹՎ ՌՃԿԹ
Assyrian calendar 6470
Balinese saka calendar 1641–1642
Bengali calendar 1127
Berber calendar 2670
British Regnal year 6  Geo. 1   7  Geo. 1
Buddhist calendar 2264
Burmese calendar 1082
Byzantine calendar 7228–7229
Chinese calendar 己亥(Earth  Pig)
4416 or 4356
     to 
庚子年 (Metal  Rat)
4417 or 4357
Coptic calendar 1436–1437
Discordian calendar 2886
Ethiopian calendar 1712–1713
Hebrew calendar 5480–5481
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1776–1777
 - Shaka Samvat 1641–1642
 - Kali Yuga 4820–4821
Holocene calendar 11720
Igbo calendar 720–721
Iranian calendar 1098–1099
Islamic calendar 1132–1133
Japanese calendar Kyōhō 5
(享保5年)
Javanese calendar 1644–1645
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4053
Minguo calendar 192 before ROC
民前192年
Nanakshahi calendar 252
Thai solar calendar 2262–2263
Tibetan calendar 阴土猪年
(female Earth-Pig)
1846 or 1465 or 693
     to 
阳金鼠年
(male Iron-Rat)
1847 or 1466 or 694
February 24: Battle of Nassau IMRAY(1884) p0210 BAHAMAS, NASSAU.jpg
February 24: Battle of Nassau

1720 (MDCCXX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1720th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 720th year of the 2nd millennium, the 20th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1720, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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Charles Edward Stuart

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Joseph Dudley
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John Rackham

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18th century Century

The 18th century lasted from January 1, 1700 to December 31, 1800. The term is often used to refer to the 1700s, the century between January 1, 1700 and December 31, 1799. During the 18th century, elements of Enlightenment thinking culminated in the American, French, and Haitian revolutions. During the century, slave trading and human trafficking expanded on a global scale. Revolutions began to challenge the legitimacy of monarchical and aristocratic power structures, including the structures and beliefs that supported the slave trade.

1661 1661

1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1661st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 661st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1661, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1720s

The 1720s decade ran from January 1, 1720, to December 31, 1729.

1657 1657

1657 (MDCLVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1657th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 657th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1657, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1638 1638

1638 (MDCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1638th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 638th year of the 2nd millennium, the 38th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1638, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1643 1643

1643 (MDCXLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1643rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 643rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1643, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1724 1724

1724 (MDCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1724th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 724th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1724, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1721 1721

1721 (MDCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1721st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 721st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1721, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1719 1719

1719 (MDCCXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1719th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 719th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1719, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1712 1712

1712 (MDCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1712th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 712th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1712, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Muhammad Shah 12Th Mughal Emperor

Nasir-ud-Din Muḥammad Shah was Mughal emperor from 1719 to 1748. He was son of Khujista Akhtar, the fourth son of Bahadur Shah I. With the help of the Sayyid brothers, he ascended the throne at the young age of 17. He later got rid of them with the help of Asaf Jah I – Syed Hussain Ali Khan was murdered at Fatehpur Sikri in 1720 and Syed Hassan Ali Khan Barha was fatally poisoned in 1722. Muhammad Shah was a great patron of the arts, including musical, cultural and administrative developments. His pen-name was Sadā Rangīla(Ever Joyous) and he is often referred to as "Muhammad Shah Rangila", also sometimes as "Bahadur Shah Rangila" after his grand father Bahadur Shah I.

Muhammad Ibrahim (Mughal emperor) Shahzada of Mughal Empire

Muhammed Ibrahim was a claimant to the throne of India.

Saadat Ali Khan I 18th-century Indian nobleman

Saadat Ali Khan was the Subahdar Nawab of Awadh (Oudh) from 26 January 1722 to 1739 and the son of Muhammad Nasir. At age 25 he accompanied his father on the final campaign of the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb against the Maratha in the Deccan, and the emperor awarded him the title of Khan Bahadur for his service.

Jansath Place in Uttar Pradesh, India

Jansath is a town and a nagar panchayat in Muzaffarnagar district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Sayyid brothers

The term Sayyid brothers refers to Syed Abdullah Khan and Syed Husain Ali Khan Barha, who were powerful in the Mughal Empire during the early 18th century.

Dost Mohammad of Bhopal 18th-century founder of Bhopal

Dost Mohammad Khan was the founder of the Bhopal State in central India. He founded the modern city of Bhopal, the capital of the Madhya Pradesh state.

Muhammad Amin Khan Turani Grand Vizier of the Mughal Empire

Muhammad Amin Khan Turani, was the Grand Vizier of the Mughal Empire during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Muhammad Shah. He is known to have served the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb during his early years.

Sayyid Hussain Ali Khan Barha Nawab of Aurangabad

Nawab Sayyid Hussain Ali Khan Barha, was a kingmaker of the later Mughal Period. Best known for ordering the death of the Emperor Farrukhsiyar largely in attempt to halt the numerous assaination attempts that the latter had ordered against him and his brother Abdullah Khan Barha. Hussain Ali Khan rose as a kingmaker in early 18th century India, when he was also the de jure ruler of Aurangabad, ruler of Ajmer by proxy and Subedar of the Deccan

Rohilla dynasty

The Rohilla Dynasty is an Indo-Afghan dynasty of Arab origin that ruled over much of North-West South Asia in the form of Rohilkhand, Kumaon, and later until 1947, the Princely State of Rampur. At the height of their power the dynasty jointly ruled over the Kingdom of Rohilkhand and the Kingdom of Kumaon, held suzairnty over the Kingdom of Garhwhal, and held the Imperial viceroyalty of Punjab an area comparable in size to Germany, Denmark and Austria. The head of the dynasty in the form of the Nawab of Rohilkhand, held several Kings subservient to himself, and is sometimes referred to as the Indo-Afghan Emperor while his domains are referred to as the Indo-Afghan Empire. Though nominally under the suzernaity of the Indian Emperors, with their borders reaching the edge of Delhi and Agra, the dynasty had almost complete control over the affairs of the Indian Emperors. The Dynasty is a senior branch of the ancient Barha Dynasty, which itself is best known for being de facto rulers over much of South Asia at the start of the 18th Century, as well as being agnates to the 15th Century Emperors of India.

Ubaidullah Shariyatullah Khan, commonly known as Mir Jumla III, was a noble who served at the court of the Mughal emperor Farrukhsiyar. He was the leader of the anti-Sayyid brothers faction of the Mughal court and exerted great influence over the Mughal emperor.

References

  1. Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History . London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp.  297–298. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  2. MacKay, Charles (2003). Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds . Harriman House Classics.
  3. "Commerce", in A Cyclopedia of Commerce and Commercial Navigation, Volume 1, ed. by J. Smith Homans, (Harper & Brothers, 1859) p391