1724

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Felipe V de Espana, Rey de.jpg
Luis I, principe de Asturias2.jpg
January 15: King Felipe V of Spain abdicates in favor of his son, who becomes King Luis I but dies 7 months later.
1724: Blenheim Palace is completed. Blenheim engraving.jpg
1724: Blenheim Palace is completed.
1724 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1724
MDCCXXIV
Ab urbe condita 2477
Armenian calendar 1173
ԹՎ ՌՃՀԳ
Assyrian calendar 6474
Balinese saka calendar 1645–1646
Bengali calendar 1131
Berber calendar 2674
British Regnal year 10  Geo. 1   11  Geo. 1
Buddhist calendar 2268
Burmese calendar 1086
Byzantine calendar 7232–7233
Chinese calendar 癸卯年 (Water  Rabbit)
4421 or 4214
     to 
甲辰年 (Wood  Dragon)
4422 or 4215
Coptic calendar 1440–1441
Discordian calendar 2890
Ethiopian calendar 1716–1717
Hebrew calendar 5484–5485
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1780–1781
 - Shaka Samvat 1645–1646
 - Kali Yuga 4824–4825
Holocene calendar 11724
Igbo calendar 724–725
Iranian calendar 1102–1103
Islamic calendar 1136–1137
Japanese calendar Kyōhō 9
(享保9年)
Javanese calendar 1648–1649
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4057
Minguo calendar 188 before ROC
民前188年
Nanakshahi calendar 256
Thai solar calendar 2266–2267
Tibetan calendar 阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
1850 or 1469 or 697
     to 
阳木龙年
(male Wood-Dragon)
1851 or 1470 or 698

1724 (MDCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1724th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 724th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1724, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

Louise of Great Britain Louise of Great Britain, Queen of Denmark and Norway.jpg
Louise of Great Britain

Deaths

Pope Innocent XIII InnocientXIII.jpg
Pope Innocent XIII
Saint Ludovico Sabbatini Ludovico sabbatini.jpg
Saint Ludovico Sabbatini
Jack Sheppard Jack Sheppard - Thornhill.jpg
Jack Sheppard

Related Research Articles

The 1720s decade ran from January 1, 1720, to December 31, 1729. In Europe it was a decade of comparative peace following a lengthy period of near continuous warfare with treaties ending the War of the Quadruple Alliance and the Great Northern War. Both Britain and France saw major financial crashes at the beginning of the decade with the South Sea Bubble and the Mississippi Company respectively. Nonetheless it was a decade of stability in both countries under the leadership of Robert Walpole and Cardinal Fleury and the two nations, recently enemies, formed the Anglo-French Alliance.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1723</span> Calendar year

1723 (MDCCXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1723rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 723rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 23rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1723, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1729</span> Calendar year

1729 (MDCCXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1729th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 729th year of the 2nd millennium, the 29th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1729, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1727</span> Calendar year

1727 (MDCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1727th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 727th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1727, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The year 1724 in music involved some significant musical events.

<i>Christ lag in Todes Banden</i>, BWV 4 Cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach

Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4, is a cantata for Easter by German composer Johann Sebastian Bach, one of his earliest church cantatas. It is agreed to be an early work partly for stylistic reasons and partly because there is evidence that it was probably written for a performance in 1707. Bach went on to complete many other works in the same genre, contributing complete cantata cycles for all occasions of the liturgical year. John Eliot Gardiner described it as Bach's "first-known attempt at painting narrative in music".

<i>Meine Seel erhebt den Herren</i>, BWV 10 Church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach

In 1724 Johann Sebastian Bach composed the church cantata Meine Seel erhebt den Herren, BWV 10, as part of his second cantata cycle. Taken from Martin Luther's German translation of the Magnificat canticle, the title translates as "My soul magnifies the Lord". Also known as Bach's German Magnificat, the work follows his chorale cantata format.

Throughout his life as a musician, Johann Sebastian Bach composed cantatas for both secular and sacred use. His church cantatas are cantatas which he composed for use in the Lutheran church, mainly intended for the occasions of the liturgical year.

Events from the year 1724 in Great Britain.

<i>O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort</i>, BWV 20 Church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach composed the church cantata O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort, BWV 20, in Leipzig for the first Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 11 June 1724. Bach composed it when beginning his second year as Thomaskantor in Leipzig. It is the first cantata he composed for his second annual cycle which was planned to contain chorale cantatas, each based on a Lutheran hymn. The cantata is focused on Johann Rist's 1642 hymn "O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort", with a chorale melody by Johann Schop. The topic of death and eternity matches the Gospel for the SUnday, the parable of the Rich man and Lazarus.

<i>Jesus schläft, was soll ich hoffen?</i> BWV 81 Church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach

Jesus schläft, was soll ich hoffen?, BWV 81, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in 1724 in Leipzig for the fourth Sunday after Epiphany and first performed it on 30 January 1724.

<i>Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland</i>, BWV 61 Church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach composed the church cantata Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61, in Weimar for the first Sunday in Advent, the Sunday which begins the liturgical year, and first performed it on 2 December 1714.

<i>Sie werden aus Saba alle kommen</i>, BWV 65 Church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach

Sie werden aus Saba alle kommen, BWV 65, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in 1724 in Leipzig for Epiphany and first performed it on 6 January 1724 as part of his first cantata cycle.

There are 52 chorale cantatas by Johann Sebastian Bach surviving in at least one complete version. Around 40 of these were composed during his second year as Thomaskantor in Leipzig, which started after Trinity Sunday 4 June 1724, and form the backbone of his chorale cantata cycle. The eldest known cantata by Bach, an early version of Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4, presumably written in 1707, was a chorale cantata. The last chorale cantata he wrote in his second year in Leipzig was Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, BWV 1, first performed on Palm Sunday, 25 March 1725. In the ten years after that he wrote at least a dozen further chorale cantatas and other cantatas that were added to his chorale cantata cycle.

<i>Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir</i>, BWV 130

Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir, BWV 130, is a chorale cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach for the Feast of archangel Michael. The oldest known version of the cantata (BWV 130.1) was performed on that feast day in 1724 during Bach's second year in Leipzig. The cantata is scored for SATB soloists and choir, three trumpets, timpani, traverso, three oboes, strings and continuo.

Das neugeborne Kindelein, BWV 122, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach composed the chorale cantata in six movements in Leipzig for the Sunday after Christmas and first performed it on 31 December 1724.

<i>Höchsterwünschtes Freudenfest</i>, BWV 194 Church cantata by J. S. Bach

Höchsterwünschtes Freudenfest, BWV 194, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for dedication of the church and organ at Störmthal on 2 November 1723.

Bach's first cantata cycle refers to the church cantatas Johann Sebastian Bach composed for the somewhat less than 60 occasions of the liturgical year of his first year as Thomaskantor in Leipzig which required concerted music. That year ran from the first Sunday after Trinity in 1723 to Trinity Sunday of the next year:

Johann Sebastian Bach's chorale cantata cycle is the year-cycle of church cantatas he started composing in Leipzig from the first Sunday after Trinity in 1724. It followed the cantata cycle he had composed from his appointment as Thomaskantor after Trinity in 1723.

The late church cantatas by Johann Sebastian Bach are sacred cantatas he composed after his fourth cycle of 1728–29. Whether Bach still composed a full cantata cycle in the last 20 years of his life is not known, but the extant cantatas of this period written for occasions of the liturgical year are sometimes referred to as his fifth cycle, as, according to his obituary, he would have written five such cycles – inasmuch as such cantatas were not late additions to earlier cycles, or were adopted in his oratorios.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Louis | king of Spain". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "Jack Sheppard | English criminal". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  3. "Het schip Slot Ter Hoge", Maritiem Erfgoed] (Dutch)
  4. Najita, Tetsuo (1987). Visions of virtue in Tokugawa Japan : the Kaitokudō Merchant Academy of Osaka. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  5. Torres, João Romano. "Vilas Boas (D. frei Manuel do Cenáculo)". Portugal - Dicionário Histórico, Corográfico, Heráldico, Biográfico, Bibliográfico, Numismático e Artístico, Volume VII (in Portuguese). Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  6. Gullino, Giuseppe (1997). "FOSCARI, Alvise". Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani, Volume 49: Forino–Francesco da Serino (in Italian). Rome: Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana. ISBN   978-8-81200032-6.
  7. "Innocent XIII | pope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  8. Young, B. W. "Wollaston, William". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/29841.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  9. "Thomas Guy". Tamworth Heritage Trust. Retrieved March 31, 2019.