1726

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1726 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1726
MDCCXXVI
Ab urbe condita 2479
Armenian calendar 1175
ԹՎ ՌՃՀԵ
Assyrian calendar 6476
Balinese saka calendar 1647–1648
Bengali calendar 1133
Berber calendar 2676
British Regnal year 12  Geo. 1   13  Geo. 1
Buddhist calendar 2270
Burmese calendar 1088
Byzantine calendar 7234–7235
Chinese calendar 乙巳(Wood  Snake)
4422 or 4362
     to 
丙午年 (Fire  Horse)
4423 or 4363
Coptic calendar 1442–1443
Discordian calendar 2892
Ethiopian calendar 1718–1719
Hebrew calendar 5486–5487
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1782–1783
 - Shaka Samvat 1647–1648
 - Kali Yuga 4826–4827
Holocene calendar 11726
Igbo calendar 726–727
Iranian calendar 1104–1105
Islamic calendar 1138–1139
Japanese calendar Kyōhō 11
(享保11年)
Javanese calendar 1650–1651
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4059
Minguo calendar 186 before ROC
民前186年
Nanakshahi calendar 258
Thai solar calendar 2268–2269
Tibetan calendar 阴木蛇年
(female Wood-Snake)
1852 or 1471 or 699
     to 
阳火马年
(male Fire-Horse)
1853 or 1472 or 700
October 26: Gullivers Travels by Jonathan Swift is published. Gullivers travels.jpg
October 26: Gullivers Travels by Jonathan Swift is published.

1726 (MDCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1726th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 726th year of the 2nd millennium, the 26th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1726, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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Births

James Hutton Sir Henry Raeburn - James Hutton, 1726 - 1797. Geologist - Google Art Project.jpg
James Hutton

Deaths

John Vanbrugh John Vanbrugh.jpg
John Vanbrugh

Related Research Articles

1743 1743

1743 (MDCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1743rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 743rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1743, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1623 1623

1623 (MDCXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1623rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 623rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 23rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1623, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1707 1707

1707 (MDCCVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1707th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 707th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1707, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1720s

The 1720s decade ran from January 1, 1720, to December 31, 1729.

1652 (MDCLII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1652nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 652nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1652, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1723 1723

1723 (MDCCXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1723rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 723rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 23rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1723, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1653 1653

1653 (MDCLIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1653rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 653rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 53rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1653, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1658 1658

1658 (MDCLVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1658th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 658th year of the 2nd millennium, the 58th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1658, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1704 1704

1704 (MDCCIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1704th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 704th year of the 2nd millennium, the 4th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1704, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1683 1683

1683 (MDCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1683rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 683rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 83rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1683, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1562 Calendar year

Year 1562 (MDLXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

House of Bourbon European royal house of French origin

The House of Bourbon is a European dynasty of French origin, a branch of the Capetian dynasty, the royal House of France. Bourbon kings first ruled France and Navarre in the 16th century. By the 18th century, members of the Spanish Bourbon dynasty held thrones in Spain, Naples, Sicily, and Parma. Spain and Luxembourg have monarchs of the House of Bourbon.

Louis XV King of France

Louis XV, known as Louis the Beloved, was King of France from 1 September 1715 until his death in 1774. He succeeded his great-grandfather Louis XIV at the age of five. Until he reached maturity on 15 February 1723, the kingdom was ruled by Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, as Regent of France. Cardinal Fleury was chief minister from 1726 until his death in 1743, at which time the king took sole control of the kingdom.

André-Hercule de Fleury

André-Hercule de Fleury, Bishop of Fréjus, Archbishop of Aix was a French cardinal who served as the chief minister of Louis XV.

Marie Leszczyńska Queen consort of France

Maria Karolina Zofia Felicja Leszczyńska, also known as Marie Leczinska, was a Polish princess and Queen consort of France from 1725 until 1768 by marriage to Louis XV. The daughter of King Stanislaus I of Poland and Catherine Opalińska, her 42-year service was the longest of any queen in French history. A devout Roman Catholic throughout her life, Marie was popular among the French people for her generosity and introduced many Polish customs to the royal court at Versailles. She was the grandmother of Louis XVI, Louis XVIII and Charles X of France.

<i>Régence</i>

The Régence was the period in French history between 1715 and 1723, when King Louis XV was a minor and the country was governed by Philippe d'Orléans, a nephew of Louis XIV of France, as prince regent.

Louis Henri, Duke of Bourbon Prince of Condé, Duke of Bourbon,

Louis Henri de Bourbon, Duke of Bourbon, or Louis Henri I, Prince of Condé, was head of the Bourbon-Condé cadet branch of the France's reigning House of Bourbon from 1710 to his death, and served as prime minister to his kinsman Louis XV from 1723 to 1726.

<i>Pacte de Famille</i> Series of 3 alliances (1773, 1743, 1761) between the Bourbon kings of France and Spain

The Pacte de Famille is one of three separate, but similar alliances between the Bourbon kings of France and Spain. As part of the settlement of the War of the Spanish Succession that brought the House of Bourbon of France to the throne of Spain. Spain and France made a series of agreements that did not unite the two thrones, but did cooperate on defined bases.

Maria Vittoria of Savoy Princess of Carignano

Maria Vittoria of Savoy was a legitimated daughter of Victor Amadeus II of Sardinia, first king of the House of Savoy. Married to the head of a cadet branch of the House of Savoy, she is an ancestor of the kings of Sardinia and of the Savoy kings of Italy.

Events from the year 1726 in France.

References

  1. Pinochet Ugarte, Augusto; Villaroel Carmona, Rafael; Lepe Orellana, Jaime; Fuente-Alba Poblete, J. Miguel; Fuenzalida Helms, Eduardo (1997). Historia militar de Chile (in Spanish) (3rd ed.). Biblioteca Militar. p. 88.
  2. Frank Ching, Ancestors: The Story of China Told Through the Lives of an Extraordinary Family (Ebury Publishing, 2011) p257
  3. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, Africans in Colonial Louisiana: The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth-Century (LSU Press, 1992)
  4. Henri Troyat, Terrible Tsarinas: Five Russian Women in Power (Algora Publishing, 2007) p23
  5. Atlas of Isoseismal Maps of Italian Earthquakes, ed. by D. Postpieschi (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 1986)
  6. "Marriage and Family Laws and Their Impact on Civil Registration of Vital Events", by Suzan Wynne, The Galitzianer (November 16, 2003)
  7. "Feast of Our Lady Mount Carmel", The Catholic Encyclopedia online
  8. Axworthy pp. 57–74