1739

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1739 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1739
MDCCXXXIX
Ab urbe condita 2492
Armenian calendar 1188
ԹՎ ՌՃՁԸ
Assyrian calendar 6489
Balinese saka calendar 1660–1661
Bengali calendar 1146
Berber calendar 2689
British Regnal year 12  Geo. 2   13  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2283
Burmese calendar 1101
Byzantine calendar 7247–7248
Chinese calendar 戊午(Earth  Horse)
4435 or 4375
     to 
己未年 (Earth  Goat)
4436 or 4376
Coptic calendar 1455–1456
Discordian calendar 2905
Ethiopian calendar 1731–1732
Hebrew calendar 5499–5500
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1795–1796
 - Shaka Samvat 1660–1661
 - Kali Yuga 4839–4840
Holocene calendar 11739
Igbo calendar 739–740
Iranian calendar 1117–1118
Islamic calendar 1151–1152
Japanese calendar Genbun 4
(元文4年)
Javanese calendar 1663–1664
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4072
Minguo calendar 173 before ROC
民前173年
Nanakshahi calendar 271
Thai solar calendar 2281–2282
Tibetan calendar 阳土马年
(male Earth-Horse)
1865 or 1484 or 712
     to 
阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1866 or 1485 or 713
February 24: Battle of Karnal. Nader Shah afshar.jpg
February 24: Battle of Karnal.

1739 (MDCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1739th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 739th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1739, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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Dick Turpin Dick turpin jumping hornsey tollgate.jpg
Dick Turpin

Related Research Articles

18th century Century

The 18th century lasted from January 1, 1701 to December 31, 1800. During the 18th century, elements of Enlightenment thinking culminated in the American, French, and Haitian revolutions. The age saw violent slave trading and human trafficking on a global scale. The reactions against monarchical and aristocratic power helped fuel the revolutionary responses against it throughout the century.

1828 1828

1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1828th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 828th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1828, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The 1730s decade ran from January 1, 1730, to December 31, 1739.

1691 1691

1691 (MDCXCI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1691st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 691st year of the 2nd millennium, the 91st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1691, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 1800

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1803 1803

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1670 1670

1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1670th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 670th year of the 2nd millennium, the 70th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1670, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1638 1638

1638 (MDCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1638th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 638th year of the 2nd millennium, the 38th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1638, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1775 1775

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1768 1768

1768 (MDCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1768th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 768th year of the 2nd millennium, the 68th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1768, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1738 1738

1738 (MDCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1738th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 738th year of the 2nd millennium, the 38th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1738, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1737 1737

1737 (MDCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1737th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 737th year of the 2nd millennium, the 37th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1737, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1736 1736

1736 (MDCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1736th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 736th year of the 2nd millennium, the 36th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1736, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1724 1724

1724 (MDCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1724th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 724th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1724, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1654 1654

1654 (MDCLIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1654th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 654th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1654, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1659 1659

1659 (MDCLIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1659th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 659th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1659, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1705 1705

1705 (MDCCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1705th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 705th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1705, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1700 1700

1700 (MDCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1700th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 700th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1700, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Muhammad Shah 12Th Mughal Emperor

Nasir-ud-Din Muḥammad Shah was Mughal emperor from 1719 to 1748. He was son of Khujista Akhtar, the fourth son of Bahadur Shah I. With the help of the Sayyid brothers, he ascended the throne at the young age of 17. He later got rid of them with the help of Asaf Jah I – Syed Hussain Ali Khan was murdered at Fatehpur Sikri in 1720 and Syed Hassan Ali Khan Barha was fatally poisoned in 1722. Muhammad Shah was a great patron of the arts, including musical, cultural and administrative developments. His pen-name was Sadā Rangīla(Ever Joyous) and he is often referred to as "Muhammad Shah Rangila", also sometimes as "Bahadur Shah Rangila" after his grand father Bahadur Shah I.

This is a timeline of the 18th century.

References

  1. "History of The New Room". Bristol: The New Room. Archived from the original on August 17, 2013. Retrieved July 17, 2011.
  2. "History". Kungl. Vetenskapsakademien. Retrieved September 27, 2011.
  3. H. T. Waghorn, Cricket Scores, Notes, etc. (1730–1773) (Blackwood, 1899) pp.22-23
  4. Sailendra Nath Sen, Anglo-Maratha Relations, 1785–96 (Popular Prakashan, 1994) p1
  5. Eric A. Lund, War for the Every Day: Generals, Knowledge, and Warfare in Early Modern Europe, 1680-1740 (Greenwood Press, 1999)
  6. Vicente Santamaría de Paredes and Harry Weston Van Dyke, A Study of the Question of Boundaries Between the Republics of Peru and Ecuador (B.S. Adams, 1910) p60
  7. Christine Kinealy and Gerard Moran, The History of the Irish Famine (Routledge, 2019)
  8. Cathal Póirtéir, ed., The Great Irish Famine (Mercier Press, 1955) pp. 53–55