1741

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1741 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1741
MDCCXLI
Ab urbe condita 2494
Armenian calendar 1190
ԹՎ ՌՃՂ
Assyrian calendar 6491
Balinese saka calendar 1662–1663
Bengali calendar 1148
Berber calendar 2691
British Regnal year 14  Geo. 2   15  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2285
Burmese calendar 1103
Byzantine calendar 7249–7250
Chinese calendar 庚申年 (Metal  Monkey)
4438 or 4231
     to 
辛酉年 (Metal  Rooster)
4439 or 4232
Coptic calendar 1457–1458
Discordian calendar 2907
Ethiopian calendar 1733–1734
Hebrew calendar 5501–5502
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1797–1798
 - Shaka Samvat 1662–1663
 - Kali Yuga 4841–4842
Holocene calendar 11741
Igbo calendar 741–742
Iranian calendar 1119–1120
Islamic calendar 1153–1154
Japanese calendar Genbun 6 / Kanpō 1
(寛保元年)
Javanese calendar 1665–1666
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4074
Minguo calendar 171 before ROC
民前171年
Nanakshahi calendar 273
Thai solar calendar 2283–2284
Tibetan calendar 阳金猴年
(male Iron-Monkey)
1867 or 1486 or 714
     to 
阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1868 or 1487 or 715
April 10 - Battle of Mollwitz Prussian Army during battle of Mollwitz 1741.jpg
April 10 Battle of Mollwitz

1741 (MDCCXLI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1741st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 741st year of the 2nd millennium, the 41st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1741, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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Births

Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor Anton von Maron 006.png
Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor

Deaths

Antonio Vivaldi Vivaldi.jpg
Antonio Vivaldi

Related Research Articles

The 1700s decade ran from January 1, 1700, to December 31, 1709.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1742</span> Calendar year

1742 (MDCCXLII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1742nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 742nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 42nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1742, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1740s</span> Decade

The 1740s decade ran from January 1, 1740, to December 31, 1749. Many events during this decade sparked an impetus for the Age of Reason. Military and technological advances brought one of the first instances of a truly global war to take place here, when Maria Theresa of Austria’s struggle to succeed the various crowns of her father King Charles VI led to a war involving nearly all European states in the War of the Austrian Succession, eventually spilling over to North America with the War of Jenkins’ Ear. Capitalism grew robust following the fallout of the South Sea bubble two decades and the subsequent reign of Sir Robert Walpole, whose rule ended in the earlier half of this decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1728</span> Calendar year

1728 (MDCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1728th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 728th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1728, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1703</span> Calendar year

1703 (MDCCIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1703rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 703rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1703, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1732</span> Calendar year

1732 (MDCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1732nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 732nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 32nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1732, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1795</span> Calendar year

1795 (MDCCXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1795th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 795th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1795, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1748</span> Year

1748 (MDCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1748th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 748th year of the 2nd millennium, the 48th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1748, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1747</span> Calendar year

1747 (MDCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1747th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 747th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1747, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1727</span> Calendar year

1727 (MDCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1727th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 727th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1727, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1710</span> Calendar year

1710 (MDCCX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1710th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 710th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1710, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1708</span> Calendar year

1708 (MDCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1708th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 708th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1708, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1706</span> Calendar year

1706 (MDCCVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1706th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 706th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1706, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1705</span> Calendar year

1705 (MDCCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1705th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 705th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1705, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1701</span> Calendar year

1701 (MDCCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1701st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 701st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1701, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">War of Jenkins' Ear</span> 1739–1748 conflict between Britain and Spain

The War of Jenkins' Ear was a conflict lasting from 1739 to 1748 between Britain and Spain. The majority of the fighting took place in New Granada and the Caribbean Sea, with major operations largely ended by 1742. It was related to the 1740 to 1748 War of the Austrian Succession. The name was coined in 1858 by British historian Thomas Carlyle, and refers to Robert Jenkins, captain of the British brig Rebecca, whose ear was allegedly severed by Spanish coast guards while searching his ship for contraband in April 1731.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Vitus Bering</span> Danish explorer (1681–1741)

Vitus Jonassen Bering, also known as Ivan Ivanovich Bering, was a Danish cartographer and explorer in Russian service, and an officer in the Russian Navy. He is known as a leader of two Russian expeditions, namely the First Kamchatka Expedition and the Great Northern Expedition, exploring the north-eastern coast of the Asian continent and from there the western coast on the North American continent. The Bering Strait, the Bering Sea, Bering Island, the Bering Glacier, and Vitus Lake were all named in his honor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Blas de Lezo</span> Spanish admiral

Admiral Blas de Lezo y Olavarrieta was a Spanish navy officer best remembered for the Battle of Cartagena de Indias (1741) in the Viceroyalty of New Granada, where Spanish imperial forces under his command decisively defeated a large British invasion fleet under Admiral Edward Vernon.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Cartagena de Indias</span> Part of the War of Jenkins Ear

The Battle of Cartagena de Indias took place during the 1739 to 1748 War of Jenkins' Ear between Spain and Great Britain. The result of long-standing commercial tensions, the war was primarily fought in the Caribbean; the British tried to capture key Spanish ports in the region, including Porto Bello and Chagres in Panama, Havana, and Cartagena de Indias in present-day Colombia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Great Northern Expedition</span> Expedition to map the Arctic coast of Siberia and North American

The Great Northern Expedition or Second Kamchatka Expedition was one of the largest exploration enterprises in history, mapping most of the Arctic coast of Siberia and some parts of the North American coastline, greatly reducing "white areas" on maps. It was conceived by Russian Emperor Peter the Great, but implemented by Russian Empresses Anna and Elizabeth. The main organiser and leader of the expedition was Vitus Bering, who earlier had been commissioned by Peter I to lead the First Kamchatka Expedition. The Second Kamchatka Expedition lasted roughly from 1733 to 1743 and later was called the Great Northern Expedition due to the immense scale of its achievements.

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