1745

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1745 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1745
MDCCXLV
Ab urbe condita 2498
Armenian calendar 1194
ԹՎ ՌՃՂԴ
Assyrian calendar 6495
Balinese saka calendar 1666–1667
Bengali calendar 1152
Berber calendar 2695
British Regnal year 18  Geo. 2   19  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2289
Burmese calendar 1107
Byzantine calendar 7253–7254
Chinese calendar 甲子(Wood  Rat)
4441 or 4381
     to 
乙丑年 (Wood  Ox)
4442 or 4382
Coptic calendar 1461–1462
Discordian calendar 2911
Ethiopian calendar 1737–1738
Hebrew calendar 5505–5506
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1801–1802
 - Shaka Samvat 1666–1667
 - Kali Yuga 4845–4846
Holocene calendar 11745
Igbo calendar 745–746
Iranian calendar 1123–1124
Islamic calendar 1157–1158
Japanese calendar Enkyō 2
(延享2年)
Javanese calendar 1669–1670
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4078
Minguo calendar 167 before ROC
民前167年
Nanakshahi calendar 277
Thai solar calendar 2287–2288
Tibetan calendar 阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1871 or 1490 or 718
     to 
阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
1872 or 1491 or 719
May 11: Battle of Fontenoy. Battle-of-Fontenoy.jpg
May 11: Battle of Fontenoy.

1745 (MDCCXLV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1745th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 745th year of the 2nd millennium, the 45th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1745, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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References

  1. "War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748)", in Wars That Changed History: 50 of the World's Greatest Conflicts: 50 of the World's Greatest Conflicts, ed. by Spencer C. Tucker (ABC-CLIO, 2015) p214
  2. "Treaty of Quadruple Alliance", International Military Alliances, 1648-2008, ed. by Douglas M. Gibler (Congressional Quarterly Press, Oct 15, 2008) p94
  3. William Reed, The History of Sugar and Sugar-yielding Plants (Longmans, Green, and Co., 1866) p50
  4. Marion F. Godfroy, Kourou and the Struggle for a French America (Springer, 2015) p193
  5. Larrie D. Ferreiro, Measure of the Earth: The Enlightenment Expedition That Reshaped Our World (Basic Books, 2011) p253
  6. 1 2 3 Maureen Cassidy-Geiger, Fragile Diplomacy (Yale University Press, 2007) p66-74
  7. 1 2 Spencer Tucker, Almanac of American Military History (ABC-CLIO, 2013) p137
  8. "War of the Austrian Succession (1740—1748)" in Wars That Changed History: 50 of the World's Greatest Conflicts, by Spencer C. Tucker (ABC-CLIO, 2015) p214
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History . London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp.  310–311. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  10. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 217–218. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  11. "War of Austrian Succession", in Germany at War: 400 Years of Military History, ed. by David T. Zabecki (ABC-CLIO, 2014) p1371
  12. J. L. Heilbron, Electricity in the 17th and 18th Centuries: A Study of Early Modern Physics (University of California Press, 1979) p311
  13. Mahinder N. Gulati, Comparative Religious And Philosophies: Anthropomorphlsm And Divinity (Atlantic Publishers, 2008) p307
  14. Mark Anielski, The Economics of Happiness: Building Genuine Wealth (New Society Publishers, 2007) p197
  15. "The White Rose on the Border", by Alison Buckler, in The Gentleman's Magazine (July 1896) p28
  16. David R. Starbuck, The Great Warpath: British Military Sites from Albany to Crown Point (University Press of New England, 1999) p28
  17. Unless the Battle of Graveney Marsh (1940) is counted.