1751

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1751 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1751
MDCCLI
Ab urbe condita 2504
Armenian calendar 1200
ԹՎ ՌՄ
Assyrian calendar 6501
Balinese saka calendar 1672–1673
Bengali calendar 1158
Berber calendar 2701
British Regnal year 24  Geo. 2   25  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2295
Burmese calendar 1113
Byzantine calendar 7259–7260
Chinese calendar 庚午(Metal  Horse)
4447 or 4387
     to 
辛未年 (Metal  Goat)
4448 or 4388
Coptic calendar 1467–1468
Discordian calendar 2917
Ethiopian calendar 1743–1744
Hebrew calendar 5511–5512
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1807–1808
 - Shaka Samvat 1672–1673
 - Kali Yuga 4851–4852
Holocene calendar 11751
Igbo calendar 751–752
Iranian calendar 1129–1130
Islamic calendar 1164–1165
Japanese calendar Kan'en 4 / Hōreki 1
(宝暦元年)
Javanese calendar 1675–1677
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4084
Minguo calendar 161 before ROC
民前161年
Nanakshahi calendar 283
Thai solar calendar 2293–2294
Tibetan calendar 阳金马年
(male Iron-Horse)
1877 or 1496 or 724
     to 
阴金羊年
(female Iron-Goat)
1878 or 1497 or 725
The Encyclopedie is first published. Encyclopedie de D'Alembert et Diderot - Premiere Page - ENC 1-NA5.jpg
The Encyclopédie is first published.

1751 ( MDCCLI ) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar , the 1751st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 751st year of the 2nd millennium , the 51st year of the 18th century , and the 2nd year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1751, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In Britain and its colonies, 1751 only had 282 days due to the Calendar Act of 1750.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Friday is any non-leap year that begins on Friday, 1 January, and ends on Friday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is C. The most recent year of such kind was 2010 and the next one will be 2021 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2011 and 2022 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 2100, will also be a common year starting on Friday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in August. Leap years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another one in February.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Georgia (U.S. state) State of the United States of America

Georgia is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Georgia is the 24th largest and 8th-most populous of the 50 United States. Georgia is bordered to the north by Tennessee and North Carolina, to the northeast by South Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by Florida, and to the west by Alabama. The state's nicknames include the Peach State and the Empire State of the South. Atlanta, a "beta(+)" global city, is both the state's capital and largest city. The Atlanta metropolitan area, with an estimated population of 5,949,951 in 2018, is the 9th most populous metropolitan area in the United States and contains about 60% of the entire state population.

Trustee Georgia is the name of the period covering the first twenty years of Georgia history, from 1732–1752, because during that time the English Province of Georgia was governed by a Board of Trustees. England's King George II, for whom the colony was named, signed a charter establishing the colony and creating its governing board on July 7, 1732. His action culminated a lengthy process.

AprilJune

April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 270 days remain until the end of the year.

Sweden constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Sweden, formal name: the Kingdom of Sweden, is a Scandinavian Nordic country in Northern Europe. It borders Norway to the west and north and Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest by a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund, a strait at the Swedish-Danish border. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the largest country in Northern Europe, the third-largest country in the European Union and the fifth largest country in Europe by area. Sweden has a total population of 10.3 million of which 2.5 million have a foreign background. It has a low population density of 22 inhabitants per square kilometre (57/sq mi). The highest concentration is in the central and southern half of the country.

Frederick I of Sweden king of Sweden

Frederick I was prince consort of Sweden from 1718 to 1720, and King of Sweden from 1720 until his death and also Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730. He ascended the throne following the death of his brother-in-law absolutist Charles XII in the Great Northern War, and the abdication of his wife, Charles's sister and successor Ulrika Eleonora, after she had to relinquish most powers to the Riksdag of the Estates and thus chose to abdicate. His powerless reign saw his family's elimination from the line of succession after the parliamentary government dominated by pro-revanchist Hat Party politicians ventured into a war with Russia, which ended in defeat and the Russian tsarina Elizabeth demanding Adolph Frederick of Holstein-Gottorp to be instated following the death of the king.

JulySeptember

July 28 is the 209th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 156 days remain until the end of the year.

The Battle of Kirkhbulakh or Battle of Kirbulakh was fought in 1751 in the village of Kirkhbulakh between Georgian and Azad Khan's armies commanded by Heraclius II and Azad-Khan respectively. Battle began with the advantage of the warlord Azad Khan, but with brilliant leadership of King Heraclius Georgians managed to rout the enemy.

The Tabriz khanate was one of the Caucasian khanates, located in historic Azerbaijan which became for nearly fifty years semi-independent from the Iranian mothercountry.

OctoberDecember

October 22 is the 295th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 70 days remain until the end of the year.

William V, Prince of Orange Prince of Orange, General Stadtholder of the United Provinces

William V, Prince of Orange was the last Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic. He went into exile to London in 1795. He was the reigning Prince of Nassau-Orange until his death in 1806. In that capacity he was succeeded by his son William.

Stadtholder title used in parts of Europe

In the Low Countries, stadtholder was an office of steward, designated a medieval official and then a national leader. The stadtholder was the replacement of the duke or earl of a province during the Burgundian and Habsburg period.

Date unknown

University of Glasgow University located in Glasgow, Scotland and founded in 1451.

The University of Glasgow is a public research university in Glasgow, Scotland. Founded by papal bull in 1451, it is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. Along with the universities of Edinburgh, Aberdeen, and St. Andrews, the university was part of the Scottish Enlightenment during the 18th century.

Adam Smith 18th-century Scottish moral philosopher and political economist

Adam Smith was a Scottish economist, philosopher and author as well as a moral philosopher, a pioneer of political economy and a key figure during the Scottish Enlightenment, also known as ''The Father of Economics'' or ''The Father of Capitalism''. Smith wrote two classic works, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) and An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). The latter, often abbreviated as The Wealth of Nations, is considered his magnum opus and the first modern work of economics. In his work, Adam Smith introduced his theory of absolute advantage.

University of Glasgow Medical School

The University of Glasgow School of Medicine is the medical school of the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and is one of the largest in Europe, offering a 5-year MBChB degree course. It is ranked 2nd in the UK for medicine by The Times Good University Guide 2018 and 5th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2018. The School of Medicine uses lecture-based learning, problem-based learning and Glasgow's case-based learning.

Births

Caroline Matilda Caroline-Mathildeofwales denmark.jpg
Caroline Matilda

Deaths

Tomaso Albinoni Albinoni.jpg
Tomaso Albinoni
King Frederick I of Sweden Frederick I of Sweden.jpg
King Frederick I of Sweden
Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke 1stViscountBolingbroke.jpg
Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke

Related Research Articles

1787 Year

1787 (MDCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1787th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 787th year of the 2nd millennium, the 87th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1787, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1796 Year

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1728 Year

1728 (MDCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1728th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 728th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1728, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1829 Year

1829 (MDCCCXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1829th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 829th year of the 2nd millennium, the 29th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1829, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1757 Year

1757 (MDCCLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1757th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 757th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1757, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1808 Year

1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1808th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 808th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1808, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The 1750s decade ran from January 1, 1750, to December 31, 1759.

1770 Year

1770 (MDCCLXX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1770th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 770th year of the 2nd millennium, the 70th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1770, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1629 Year

1629 (MDCXXIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1629th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 629th year of the 2nd millennium, the 29th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1629, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1786 Year

1786 (MDCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1786th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 786th year of the 2nd millennium, the 86th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1786, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1766 Year

1766 (MDCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1766th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 766th year of the 2nd millennium, the 66th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1766, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1763 Year

1763 (MDCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1763rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 763rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1763, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1740 Year

1740 (MDCCXL) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1740th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 740th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1740, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1722 Year

1722 (MDCCXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1722nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 722nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 22nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1722, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1647 Year

1647 (MDCXLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1647th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 647th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1647, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1712 Year

1712 (MDCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1712th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 712th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1712, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it began as a leap year starting on Monday and remained so until Thursday, February 29. By adding a second leap day Sweden reverted to the Julian calendar and the rest of the year was in sync with the Julian calendar. Sweden finally made the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1753. This year has 367 days.

1709 Year

1709 (MDCCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1709th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 709th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1709, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Friday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1702 (MDCCII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1702nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 702nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1702, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Wednesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1700 Year

1700 (MDCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1700th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 700th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1700, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 11 days until February 28, 1800.

Events from the year 1751 in Great Britain.

References

  1. James Van Horn Melton, Religion, Community, and Slavery on the Colonial Southern Frontier (Cambridge University Press, 2015) p. 232
  2. Charles E. Cobb Jr., On the Road to Freedom: A Guided Tour of the Civil Rights Trail (Algonquin Books, 2008) p. 156
  3. "Penn's Heritage", University of Pennsylvania website
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  5. Craig A. Doherty and Katherine M. Doherty, The Thirteen Colonies: Georgia (Infobase Publishing, 2005) p. 64
  6. Edward J. Cashin, Beloved Bethesda: A History of George Whitefield's Home for Boys, 1740–2000 (Mercer University Press, 2001) p. 67
  7. Yingcong Dai, The Sichuan Frontier and Tibet: Imperial Strategy in the Early Qing (University of Washington Press, 2009) p. 131
  8. N. S. Ramaswami, Political History of Carnatic Under the Nawabs (Abhinav Publications, 1984) pp145-146
  9. Catherine Robson, Heart Beats: Everyday Life and the Memorized Poem (Princeton University Press, 2012) p134
  10. Troy Taylor, Wicked New Orleans: The Dark Side of the Big Easy (Arcadia Publishing, 2010)
  11. "Saturday's Post from the Whitehall and General Evening Posts", The Derby Mercury (Derby, Derbyshire), September 15, 1752, p. 1
  12. 1 2 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 314–315. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
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  14. Notes and Queries: A Medium of Intercommunication for Literary Men, General Readers, Etc., April 21, 1894 (Oxford University Press, 1894_ p314
  15. John Thorn, Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game (Simon and Schuster, 2012) p64
  16. Tom Melville, The Tented Field: A History of Cricket in America (Popular Press, 1998) p5
  17. Thomas G. Morton and Frank Woodbury, The History of the Pennsylvania Hospital, 1751-1895"' (Philadelphia Times Printing House, 1895) p376
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  23. Elizabeth A. Fenn, Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82 (Macmillan, 2002) p14
  24. Thomas E. Sheridan, Empire of Sand: The Seri Indians and the Struggle for Spanish Sonora, 1645-1803 (University of Arizona Press, 1999) p178
  25. David H. Corkran, The Cherokee Frontier: Conflict and Survival, 1740–62 (University of Oklahoma Press, 2016) pp32-33
  26. Semple, Clare (2006). A Silver Legend: the story of the Maria Theresa Thaler. Manchester: Barzan Publishing. ISBN   0-9549701-0-1.