1754

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1754 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1754
MDCCLIV
Ab urbe condita 2507
Armenian calendar 1203
ԹՎ ՌՄԳ
Assyrian calendar 6504
Balinese saka calendar 1675–1676
Bengali calendar 1161
Berber calendar 2704
British Regnal year 27  Geo. 2   28  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2298
Burmese calendar 1116
Byzantine calendar 7262–7263
Chinese calendar 癸酉(Water  Rooster)
4450 or 4390
     to 
甲戌年 (Wood  Dog)
4451 or 4391
Coptic calendar 1470–1471
Discordian calendar 2920
Ethiopian calendar 1746–1747
Hebrew calendar 5514–5515
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1810–1811
 - Shaka Samvat 1675–1676
 - Kali Yuga 4854–4855
Holocene calendar 11754
Igbo calendar 754–755
Iranian calendar 1132–1133
Islamic calendar 1167–1168
Japanese calendar Hōreki 4
(宝暦4年)
Javanese calendar 1679–1680
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4087
Minguo calendar 158 before ROC
民前158年
Nanakshahi calendar 286
Thai solar calendar 2296–2297
Tibetan calendar 阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
1880 or 1499 or 727
     to 
阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1881 or 1500 or 728
May 14: Start of the French and Indian War with the Battle of Fort Necessity The Night Council At Fort Necessity from the Darlington Collection of Engravings.PNG
May 14: Start of the French and Indian War with the Battle of Fort Necessity

1754 ( MDCCLIV ) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar , the 1754th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 754th year of the 2nd millennium , the 54th year of the 18th century , and the 5th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1754, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is F. The current year, 2019, is a common year starting on Tuesday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 2013 and the next such year will be 2030, or, likewise, 2014 and 2025 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Leap years starting on Monday share this characteristic. From July of the year that precedes this year until September in this type of year is the longest period that occurs without a Friday the 13th. Leap years starting on Saturday share this characteristic, from August of the common year that precedes it to October in that type of year.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 337 days remaining until the end of the year.

Horace Walpole 18th-century English art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician

Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, also known as Horace Walpole, was an English writer, art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician.

Serendipity means an unplanned, fortunate discovery. Serendipity is a common occurrence throughout the history of product invention and scientific discovery. In recent years, the phenomenon has become a potential design principle in online activity for preventing filter bubbles and echo chambers.

AprilJune

April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 245 days remaining until the end of the year.

May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 231 days remaining until the end of the year.

The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews golf club in Scotland

The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews is the oldest and most prestigious golf club in the world. It is based in St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, and is regarded as the worldwide "Home of Golf". Formerly, it was also one of the governing authorities of the game, but in 2004 this role was handed over to a newly formed group of companies, collectively known as The R&A.

JulySeptember

July 3 is the 184th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 181 days remaining until the end of the year.

French and Indian War North American theater of the worldwide Seven Years War

The French and Indian War (1754–1763) pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies. At the start of the war, the French colonies had a population of roughly 60,000 settlers, compared with 2 million in the British colonies. The outnumbered French particularly depended on the Indians.

Battle of Fort Necessity Opening battle in the French and Indian War

The Battle of Fort Necessity took place on July 3, 1754, in what is now Farmington in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. The engagement, along with the May 28 skirmish known as the Battle of Jumonville Glen, was George Washington's first military experience and the only surrender of his military career. The Battle of Fort Necessity began the French and Indian War, which later spiraled into the global conflict known as the Seven Years' War.

OctoberDecember

October 24 is the 297th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 68 days remaining until the end of the year.

China State in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

Qianlong Emperor emperor of the Qing Dynasty

The Qianlong Emperor was the fifth emperor of the Manchu-led Qing dynasty, and the fourth Qing emperor to rule over China proper. Born Hongli, the fourth son of the Yongzheng Emperor, he reigned officially from 11 October 1735 to 8 February 1796. On 8 February, he abdicated in favour of his son, the Jiaqing Emperor—a filial act in order not to reign longer than his grandfather, the illustrious Kangxi Emperor. Despite his retirement, however, he retained ultimate power as the Emperor Emeritus until his death in 1799; he thus was one of the longest-reigning de facto rulers in the history of the world, and dying at the age of 87, one of the longest-lived. As a capable and cultured ruler inheriting a thriving empire, during his long reign the Qing Empire reached its most splendid and prosperous era, boasting a large population and economy. As a military leader, he led military campaigns expanding the dynastic territory to the largest extent by conquering and sometimes destroying Central Asian kingdoms. This turned around in his late years: the Qing empire began to decline with corruption and wastefulness in his court and a stagnating civil society.

Date unknown

William Churton was an early North Carolina surveyor.

Orange County, North Carolina county in North Carolina, United States

Orange County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 133,801. Its county seat is Hillsborough.

1759 Year

1759 (MDCCLIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1759th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 759th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1759, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In Great Britain, this year was known as the Annus Mirabilis, because of British victories in the Seven Years' War.

Births

Louis XVI of France Antoine-Francois Callet - Louis XVI, roi de France et de Navarre (1754-1793), revetu du grand costume royal en 1779 - Google Art Project.jpg
Louis XVI of France

Deaths

Marie Isabelle de Rohan, Duchess of Tallard died 5 January Portrait de Marie Isabelle de Rohan, duchesse de Tallard (1699-1754) Gouvernante des Enfants de France.jpg
Marie Isabelle de Rohan, Duchess of Tallard died 5 January
Lord Archibald Hamilton died 5 April Archibald Hamilton of Riccarton and Pardovan.jpg
Lord Archibald Hamilton died 5 April
Maria Teresa Felicitas d'Este died 30 April MariaTheresiaFeliciavanModena.jpg
Maria Teresa Felicitas d'Este died 30 April
Carl Georg Sioblad died 1 September Carl-georg-sioblad.jpg
Carl Georg Siöblad died 1 September
Safdar Jang died 5 October Safdarjung, second Nawab of Awadh, Mughal dynasty. India. early 18th century.jpg
Safdar Jang died 5 October
Mahmud I died 13 December Mahmud1.jpg
Mahmud I died 13 December

January–June

July–December

Related Research Articles

1756 Year

1756 (MDCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1756th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 756th year of the 2nd millennium, the 56th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1756, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Thirteen Colonies The group of British colonies on the east coast of North America which formed the United States

The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colonies or Thirteen American Colonies, were a group of British colonies on the Atlantic coast of North America founded in the 17th and 18th centuries. They declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States of America. The Thirteen Colonies had very similar political, constitutional, and legal systems and were dominated by Protestant English-speakers. They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada, the Caribbean, and the Floridas.

1755 Year

1755 (MDCCLV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1755th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 755th year of the 2nd millennium, the 55th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1755, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1635 Year

1635 (MDCXXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1635th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 635th year of the 2nd millennium, the 35th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1635, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1637 Year

1637 (MDCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1637th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 637th year of the 2nd millennium, the 37th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1637, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1641 Year

1641 (MDCXLI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1641st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 641st year of the 2nd millennium, the 41st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1641, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. 1641 is the generally accepted year of the birth of the modern timepiece.

1767 Year

1767 (MDCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1767th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 767th year of the 2nd millennium, the 67th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1767, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1777 Year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1766 Year

1766 (MDCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1766th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 766th year of the 2nd millennium, the 66th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1766, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1763 Year

1763 (MDCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1763rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 763rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1763, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1722 Year

1722 (MDCCXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1722nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 722nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 22nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1722, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1663 Year

1663 (MDCLXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1663rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 663rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1663, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1701 Year

1701 (MDCCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1701st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 701st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1701, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Tuesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1673 Year

1673 (MDCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1673rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 673rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 73rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1673, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

This section of the timeline of United States history concerns events from before the lead up to the American Revolution.

Albany Congress meeting of representatives from seven of the thirteen British colonies

The Albany Congress was a meeting of representatives sent by the legislatures of seven of the thirteen British colonies in British America: Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. Northernmost Newfoundland and Nova Scotia were not in attendance. Representatives met daily at the Stadt Huys in Albany, New York, from June 18 to July 11, 1754, to discuss better relations with the American Indian tribes and common defensive measures against the French threat from Canada in the opening stage of the French and Indian War, the North American front of the Seven Years' War between Great Britain and France.

Proprietary colony type of British colony especially in North America and the Caribbean in the 17th century

A proprietary colony was a type of British colony mostly in North America and the Caribbean in the 17th century. In the British Empire, all land belonged to the ruler, and it was his prerogative to divide. Therefore, all colonial properties were partitioned by royal charter into one of four types: proprietary, royal, joint stock, or covenant. King Charles II used the proprietary solution to reward allies and focus his own attention on Britain itself. He offered his friends colonial charters which facilitated private investment and colonial self-government. The charters made the proprietor the effective ruler, albeit one ultimately responsible to English Law and the King. Charles II gave New Netherland to his younger brother The Duke of York, who named it New York. He gave an area to William Penn who named it Pennsylvania.

1776 Year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1754 in Great Britain.

References

  1. Barbara Anne Ganson, The Guarani Under Spanish Rule in the Rio de la Plata (Stanford University Press, 2005) p104
  2. "Aspectos Históricos del Municipio". Petén: Melchor de Mencos. 2008-05-09. Archived from the original on 2008-05-10. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  3. Roldán Martínez, Ingrid (2004). "De bosques y otros nombres". Revista D. PrensaLibre. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  4. 1 2 3 Alan Rogers, Empire and Liberty: American Resistance to British Authority, 1755-1763 (University of California Press, 1974) pp13-19
  5. 1 2 Robert McCaughey, Stand, Columbia: A History of Columbia University (Columbia University Press, 2003) p21
  6. Farris W. Cadle, Georgia Land Surveying History and Law (University of Georgia Press, 1991) p29
  7. Edward J. Cashin, Governor Henry Ellis and the Transformation of British North America (University of Georgia Press, 2007) p61
  8. John A. Nagy, George Washington's Secret Spy War: The Making of America's First Spymaster (St. Martin's Press, 2016) p37
  9. "Johnson, Susannah", by Marcia Schmidt Blaine, in An Encyclopedia of American Women at War: From the Home Front to the Battlefields, ed. by Lisa Tendrich Frank (ABC-CLIO, 2013) pp332-333
  10. Charles Hutton, et al., The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, from Their Commencement, in 1665, to the Year 1800, Volume X: From 1750 to 1755 (C. and R. Baldwin, 1809) p549
  11. Andrew Hempstead, Canadian Rockies: Including Banff & Jasper National Parks, Moon Handbooks (Avalon Publishing, 2016)
  12. Philip A. Kuhn, Chinese Among Others: Emigration in Modern Times (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009) p94
  13. Isaac Dookhan, A History of the Virgin Islands of the United States (Caribbean Universities Press, 1974, reprinted by Canoe Press, 1994) p200
  14. Kaveh Farrokh, Iran at War: 1500-1988 (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2011)

Further reading