1754

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May 14: The Battle of Fort Necessity begins the French and Indian War. The Night Council At Fort Necessity from the Darlington Collection of Engravings.PNG
May 14: The Battle of Fort Necessity begins the French and Indian War.
1754 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1754
MDCCLIV
Ab urbe condita 2507
Armenian calendar 1203
ԹՎ ՌՄԳ
Assyrian calendar 6504
Balinese saka calendar 1675–1676
Bengali calendar 1161
Berber calendar 2704
British Regnal year 27  Geo. 2   28  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2298
Burmese calendar 1116
Byzantine calendar 7262–7263
Chinese calendar 癸酉年 (Water  Rooster)
4451 or 4244
     to 
甲戌年 (Wood  Dog)
4452 or 4245
Coptic calendar 1470–1471
Discordian calendar 2920
Ethiopian calendar 1746–1747
Hebrew calendar 5514–5515
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1810–1811
 - Shaka Samvat 1675–1676
 - Kali Yuga 4854–4855
Holocene calendar 11754
Igbo calendar 754–755
Iranian calendar 1132–1133
Islamic calendar 1167–1168
Japanese calendar Hōreki 4
(宝暦4年)
Javanese calendar 1679–1680
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4087
Minguo calendar 158 before ROC
民前158年
Nanakshahi calendar 286
Thai solar calendar 2296–2297
Tibetan calendar 阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
1880 or 1499 or 727
     to 
阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1881 or 1500 or 728

1754 (MDCCLIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1754th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 754th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1754, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

Frederic-Cesar de La Harpe Frederic-Cesar de La Harpe by Pajou.jpg
Frédéric-César de La Harpe
Louis XVI of France Antoine-Francois Callet - Louis XVI, roi de France et de Navarre (1754-1793), revetu du grand costume royal en 1779 - Google Art Project.jpg
Louis XVI of France

Date unknown

Deaths

Marie Isabelle de Rohan, Duchess of Tallard died 5 January Portrait de Marie Isabelle de Rohan, duchesse de Tallard (1699-1754) Gouvernante des Enfants de France.jpg
Marie Isabelle de Rohan, Duchess of Tallard died 5 January
Lord Archibald Hamilton died 5 April Archibald Hamilton of Riccarton and Pardovan.jpg
Lord Archibald Hamilton died 5 April
Maria Teresa Felicitas d'Este died 30 April MariaTheresiaFeliciavanModena.jpg
Maria Teresa Felicitas d'Este died 30 April
Carl Georg Sioblad died 1 September Carl-georg-sioblad.jpg
Carl Georg Siöblad died 1 September
Safdar Jang died 5 October Safdarjung, second Nawab of Awadh, Mughal dynasty. India. early 18th century.jpg
Safdar Jang died 5 October
Mahmud I died 13 December Mahmud1.jpg
Mahmud I died 13 December

January–June

July–December

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1770s</span> Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1770s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1770, and ended on December 31, 1779. A period full of discoveries, breakthroughs happened in all walks of life, as what emerged at this period brought life to most innovations we know today.

The 1700s decade ran from January 1, 1700, to December 31, 1709.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1760s</span> Decade in the 18th Century (1700s)

The 1760s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1760, and ended on December 31, 1769.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1695</span> Items of interest from year 1695

1695 (MDCXCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1695th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 695th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1695, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1774</span> Calendar year

1774 (MDCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1774th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 774th year of the 2nd millennium, the 74th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1774, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The 1690s decade ran from January 1, 1690, to December 31, 1699.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1755</span> Calendar year

1755 (MDCCLV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1755th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 755th year of the 2nd millennium, the 55th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1755, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1750s</span> Decade

The 1750s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1750, and ended on December 31, 1759. The 1750s was a pioneering decade. Waves of settlers flooded the New World in hopes of re-establishing life away from European control, and electricity was a field of novelty that had yet to be merged with the studies of chemistry and engineering. Numerous discoveries of the 1750s forged the basis for contemporary scientific consensus. The decade saw the end of the Baroque period.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1625</span> Calendar year

1625 (MDCXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1625th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 625th year of the 2nd millennium, the 25th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1625, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1637</span> Calendar year

1637 (MDCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1637th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 637th year of the 2nd millennium, the 37th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1637, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1767 (MDCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1767th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 767th year of the 2nd millennium, the 67th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1767, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1775</span> Calendar year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1766</span> Calendar year

1766 (MDCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1766th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 766th year of the 2nd millennium, the 66th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1766, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1763</span> Calendar year

1763 (MDCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1763rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 763rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1763, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1734</span> Calendar year

1734 (MDCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1734th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 734th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1734, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1704</span> Calendar year

1704 (MDCCIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1704th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 704th year of the 2nd millennium, the 4th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1704, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1701</span> Calendar year

1701 (MDCCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1701st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 701st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1701, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1696</span> Calendar year

1696 (MDCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1696th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 696th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1696, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1776</span> Calendar year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1754 in Great Britain.

References

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  19. "POWLETT, Charles II, Marquess of Winchester (1685-1754), of Hackwood, nr. Basingstoke, Hants". History of Parliament Online (1690-1715). Retrieved October 12, 2021.
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Further reading