1755

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1755 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1755
MDCCLV
Ab urbe condita 2508
Armenian calendar 1204
ԹՎ ՌՄԴ
Assyrian calendar 6505
Balinese saka calendar 1676–1677
Bengali calendar 1162
Berber calendar 2705
British Regnal year 28  Geo. 2   29  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2299
Burmese calendar 1117
Byzantine calendar 7263–7264
Chinese calendar 甲戌(Wood  Dog)
4451 or 4391
     to 
乙亥年 (Wood  Pig)
4452 or 4392
Coptic calendar 1471–1472
Discordian calendar 2921
Ethiopian calendar 1747–1748
Hebrew calendar 5515–5516
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1811–1812
 - Shaka Samvat 1676–1677
 - Kali Yuga 4855–4856
Holocene calendar 11755
Igbo calendar 755–756
Iranian calendar 1133–1134
Islamic calendar 1168–1169
Japanese calendar Hōreki 5
(宝暦5年)
Javanese calendar 1680–1681
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4088
Minguo calendar 157 before ROC
民前157年
Nanakshahi calendar 287
Thai solar calendar 2297–2298
Tibetan calendar 阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1881 or 1500 or 728
     to 
阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
1882 or 1501 or 729
August 10: Expulsion of the Acadians begins A View of the Plundering and Burning of the City of Grymross, by Thomas Davies, 1758.JPG
August 10: Expulsion of the Acadians begins

1755 ( MDCCLV ) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar , the 1755th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 755th year of the 2nd millennium , the 55th year of the 18th century , and the 6th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1755, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2015 and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

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Events

JanuaryMarch

January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 342 days remaining until the end of the year.

Tatiana Day Russian religious holiday

Tatiana Day is a Russian religious holiday observed on 25 January according to the Gregorian calendar, January 12 according to the Julian. It is named after Saint Tatiana, a Christian martyr in 3rd-century Rome during the reign of Emperor Alexander Severus.

Moscow State University university in Moscow, Russia

Moscow State University is a coeducational and public research university located in Moscow, Russia. It was founded on 23 January [O.S. 12 January] 1755 by Mikhail Lomonosov. MSU was renamed after Lomonosov in 1940 and was then known as Lomonosov University. It also houses the tallest educational building in the world. Its current rector is Viktor Sadovnichiy. According to the 2018 QS World University Rankings, it is the highest-ranking Russian educational institution and is widely considered the most prestigious university in the former Soviet Union.

AprilJune

April 2 is the 92nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 273 days remaining until the end of the year.

Sir William James, 1st Baronet Welsh naval commander in India

Commodore Sir William James, 1st Baronet, FRS was a Welsh-born commander of the East India Company navy, director of the Company and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1774 to 1783. He conducted successful campaigns against the navies of Indian territories.

East India Company 16th through 19th-century British trading company

The East India Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India Company and informally as John Company, Company Bahadur, or simply The Company, was an English and later British joint-stock company. It was formed to trade in the Indian Ocean region, initially with Mughal India and the East Indies, and later with Qing China. The company ended up seizing control over large parts of the Indian subcontinent, colonised parts of Southeast Asia, and colonised Hong Kong after a war with Qing China.

JulySeptember

July 9 is the 190th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 175 days remaining until the end of the year.

French and Indian War North American theater of the worldwide Seven Years War

The French and Indian War (1754–1763) pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies. At the start of the war, the French colonies had a population of roughly 60,000 settlers, compared with 2 million in the British colonies. The outnumbered French particularly depended on the Indians.

Braddock Expedition

The Braddock expedition, also called Braddock's campaign or, more commonly, Braddock's Defeat, was a failed British military expedition which attempted to capture the French Fort Duquesne in the summer of 1755 during the French and Indian War. It was defeated at the Battle of the Monongahela on July 9, and the survivors retreated. The expedition takes its name from General Edward Braddock, who led the British forces and died in the effort. Braddock's defeat was a major setback for the British in the early stages of the war with France and has been described as one of the most disastrous defeats for the British in the 18th century.

OctoberDecember

October 11 is the 284th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 81 days remaining until the end of the year.

Dutch West India Company Dutch trading company

Dutch West India Company was a chartered company of Dutch merchants as well as foreign investors. Among its founders was Willem Usselincx (1567–1647). On June 3, 1621, it was granted a charter for a trade monopoly in the Dutch West Indies by the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands and given jurisdiction over Dutch participation in the Atlantic slave trade, Brazil, the Caribbean, and North America. The area where the company could operate consisted of West Africa and the Americas, which included the Pacific Ocean and the eastern part of New Guinea. The intended purpose of the charter was to eliminate competition, particularly Spanish or Portuguese, between the various trading posts established by the merchants. The company became instrumental in the largely ephemeral Dutch colonization of the Americas in the seventeenth century. From 1624 to 1654, in the context of the Dutch-Portuguese War, the WIC held Portuguese territory in northeast Brazil, but they were ousted from Dutch Brazil following fierce resistance.

Ashanti Empire former country

The AshantiEmpire was an Akan empire and kingdom in what is now modern-day Ghana from 1670 to 1957. The Ashanti Empire expanded from Ashanti to include the Brong-Ahafo Region, Central Region, Eastern Region, Greater Accra Region and Western Region of present-day Ghana. Due to the empire's military prowess, wealth, architecture, sophisticated hierarchy and culture, the Ashanti Kingdom has been extensively studied and has more historiographies by European, primarily British, authors than any other indigenous culture of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Date unknown

Wolsey is a heritage British clothing brand founded in 1755, making it one of the oldest existing textile companies in the world. The brand sells men's clothing and accessories, including a range of knitwear, socks, underwear and scarves. The company holds a Royal Warrant and is based in Leicester, England, where it was originally established. The company name, adopted in 1920 when R Walker & Sons merged with W Tyler and Sons, is a reference to Cardinal Wolsey. 'Wolsey' is a registered trademark.

Leicester City and unitary authority area in England

Leicester is a city and unitary authority area in the East Midlands of England, and the county town of Leicestershire. The city lies on the River Soar and close to the eastern end of the National Forest.

2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2005th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 5th year of the 3rd millennium, the 5th year of the 21st century, and the 6th year of the 2000s decade.

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Montesquieu
Saint Gerard Majella Gerardo Maiella.jpg
Saint Gerard Majella

Related Research Articles

The 1750s decade ran from January 1, 1750, to December 31, 1759.

Edward Braddock British Army general

Major General Edward Braddock was a British officer and commander-in-chief for the Thirteen Colonies during the actions at the start of the French and Indian War (1754–1763), which is also known in Europe and Canada as the Seven Years' War (1756–1763). He is generally best remembered for his command of a disastrous expedition against the French-occupied Ohio River Valley in 1755, in which he lost his life.

Expulsion of the Acadians 18th century geopolitical event

The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island — parts of an area also known as Acadia. The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War and was part of the British military campaign against New France. The British first deported Acadians to the Thirteen Colonies, and after 1758, transported additional Acadians to Britain and France. In all, of the 14,100 Acadians in the region, approximately 11,500 Acadians were deported. A census of 1764 indicates that 2,600 Acadians remained in the colony, presumably having eluded capture.

1755 in Canada

Events from the year 1755 in Canada.

Isthmus of Chignecto landform

The Isthmus of Chignecto is an isthmus bordering the Maritime provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia that connects the Nova Scotia peninsula with North America.

Fort Beauséjour French-built fort in Acadia now a park

Fort Beauséjour is a large five-bastioned star fort on the Isthmus of Chignecto, a neck of land connecting present-day New Brunswick with Nova Scotia, Canada. The site was strategically important in Acadia, a French colony that included parts of what is now Quebec, The Maritimes, and northern Maine. It was built by the French from 1751 to 1752. It was surrendered to the British in 1755 after the Battle of Fort Beauséjour and renamed Fort Cumberland. The fort played an important role in the Anglo-French rivalry of 1749-63 and in the 1776 Battle of Fort Cumberland when sympathisers of the American Revolution were repulsed.

Battle of Fort Beauséjour

The Battle of Fort Beauséjour was fought on the Isthmus of Chignecto and marked the end of Father Le Loutre's War and the opening of a British offensive in the Acadia/ Nova Scotia theatre of the Seven Years' War, which would eventually lead to the end of the French Empire in North America. The battle also reshaped the settlement patterns of the Atlantic region, and laid the groundwork for the modern province of New Brunswick.

Fort Edward (Nova Scotia)

Fort Edward is a National Historic Site of Canada in Windsor, Nova Scotia, and was built during Father Le Loutre's War (1749-1755). The British built the fort to help prevent the Acadian Exodus from the region. The Fort is most famous for the role it played both in the Expulsion of the Acadians (1755) and in protecting Halifax, Nova Scotia from a land assault in the American Revolution. While much of Fort Edward has been destroyed, including the officers quarters and barracks, the blockhouse that remains is the oldest extant in North America. A cairn was later added to the site.

Charles Deschamps de Boishébert et de Raffetot French army officer

Charles Deschamps de Boishébert was a member of the Compagnies Franches de la Marine and was a significant leader of the Acadian militia's resistance to the Expulsion of the Acadians. He settled and tried to protect Acadians refugees along the rivers of New Brunswick. At Beaubears National Park on Beaubears Island, New Brunswick he settled refugee Acadians during the Expulsion of the Acadians.

History of the Acadians

The Acadians are the descendants of the French settlers, and sometimes the Indigenous peoples, of parts of Acadia in the northeastern region of North America comprising what is now the Canadian Maritime Provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, a Gaspé, in Quebec, and to the Kennebec River in southern Maine.

John Winslow (British Army officer) British Army general

Major-General John Winslow, descendant of Pilgrim Edward Winslow, was an officer during the French and Indian War.

Military of New France

The military of New France consisted of a mix of regular soldiers from the French Army and French Navy supported by small local volunteer militia units. Most early troops were sent from France, but localization after the growth of the colony meant that, by the 1690s, many were volunteers from the settlers of New France, and by the 1750s most troops were descendants of the original French inhabitants. Additionally, many of the early troops and officers who were born in France remained in the colony after their service ended, contributing to generational service and a military elite. The French built a series of forts from Newfoundland to Louisiana and others captured from the British during the 1600s to the late 1700s. Some were a mix of military post and trading forts.

Montcalm and Wolfe (ISBN 0-306-80621-5) is the sixth volume in Francis Parkman's seven-volume history, France and England in North America, originally published in 1884. It tells the story of the French and Indian War. Its title refers to Louis-Joseph de Montcalm and James Wolfe, the commanding generals of the French and English forces respectively and to whom the book devotes particular attention. Parkman considered the book his masterpiece.

Colonial American military history military record of the Thirteen Colonies from their founding to the American Revolution in 1775

Colonial American military history is the military record of the Thirteen Colonies from their founding to the American Revolution in 1775.

Siege of Port Royal (1710) military siege by British regular and provincial forces against a French Acadian garrison and the Wabanaki Confederacy at the Acadian capital, Port Royal

The Siege of Port Royal, also known as the Conquest of Acadia, was a military siege conducted by British regular and provincial forces under the command of Francis Nicholson against a French Acadian garrison and the Wabanaki Confederacy under the command of Daniel d'Auger de Subercase, at the Acadian capital, Port Royal. The successful British siege marked the beginning of permanent British control over the peninsular portion of Acadia, which they renamed Nova Scotia, and it was the first time the British took and held a French colonial possession. After the French surrender, the British occupied the fort in the capital with all the pomp and ceremony of having captured one of the great fortresses of Europe, and renamed it Annapolis Royal.

Duc dAnville expedition

The Duc d'Anville expedition was sent from France to recapture Louisbourg and take peninsular Acadia. The expedition was the largest military force ever to set sail for the New World prior to the American Revolution. This effort was the fourth and final French attempt to regain the Nova Scotian capital, Annapolis Royal, during King George's War. The Expedition was also supported on land by a force from Quebec under the command of Jean-Baptiste Nicolas Roch de Ramezay. Along with recapturing Acadia from the British, d'Anville was ordered to "consign Boston to flames, ravage New England and waste the British West Indies." News of the expedition spread fear throughout New York and New England.

Bay of Fundy Campaign

The Bay of Fundy Campaign occurred during the French and Indian War when the British ordered the Expulsion of the Acadians from Acadia after the Battle of Fort Beauséjour (1755). The Campaign started at Chignecto and then quickly moved to Grand Pré, Rivière-aux-Canards, Pisiguit, Cobequid, and finally Annapolis Royal. Approximately 7,000 Acadians were deported to the New England colonies.

Military history of Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia is a Canadian province located in Canada's Maritimes. The region was initially occupied by Mi'kmaq. During the first 150 years of European settlement, the colony was primarily made up of Catholic Acadians, Maliseet and Mi'kmaq. During the latter seventy-five years of this time period, there were six colonial wars that took place in Nova Scotia. After agreeing to several peace treaties, this long period of warfare ended with the Burial of the Hatchet Ceremony between the British and the Mi'kmaq (1761) and two years later when the British defeated the French in North America (1763). During these wars, Acadians, Mi'kmaq and Maliseet from the region fought to protect the border of Acadia from New England. They fought the war on two fronts: the southern border of Acadia, which New France defined as the Kennebec River in southern Maine. The other front was in Nova Scotia and involved preventing New Englanders from taking the capital of Acadia, Port Royal, establishing themselves at Canso.

References

  1. Paul R. Wonning, Colonial American History Stories, 1753—1763: Forgotten and Famous Historical Events (Mossy Feet Books, 2017)
  2. Rodney Bruce Hall, National Collective Identity: Social Constructs and International Systems (Columbia University Press, 1999) p116
  3. Philip Smucker, Riding with George: Sportsmanship & Chivalry in the Making of America's First President (Chicago Review Press, 2017)
  4. 1 2 3 Jonathan R. Dull, The Miracle of American Independence: Twenty Ways Things Could Have Turned Out Differently (University of Nebraska Press, 2015) p22
  5. Federal Writers' Project, The WPA Guide to Texas: The Lone Star State (U.S. Government Printing Office, 1934, reprinted by Trinity University Press, 2013)
  6. David L. Preston, Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2015) p112
  7. Frank Basil Tracy, The Tercentenary History of Canada: From Champlain to Laurier, MDCVIII-MCMVIII, Volume II (P. F. Collier & Son, 1908) p387
  8. Stuart P. Boehmig, Images of America: Downtown Pittsburgh (Arcadia Publishing, 2007) p13
  9. Phillip Papas, Renegade Revolutionary: The Life of General Charles Lee (New York University Press, 2014) p30
  10. "Black (Joseph)", in Bibliotheca Osleriana: A Catalogue of Books Illustrating the History of Medicine and Science by Sir William Osler (McGill-Queen's University Press, 1969) p116
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  12. "Sailing Ship Dodington (history)". Dodington Family. 2002. Archived from the original on 2005-01-14. Retrieved 2 April 2012.
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  17. Ian Grey, Catherine the Great (New Word City, 2016)
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  19. Dee Morris and Dora St. Martin, Somerville, Massachusetts: A Brief History (Arcadia Publishing, 2008)
  20. Harvey M. Feinberg, Africans and Europeans in West Africa: Elminans and Dutchmen on the Gold Coast During the Eighteenth Century (American Philosophical Society, 1989) p108
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  22. Kevin Kenny, Peaceable Kingdom Lost: The Paxton Boys and the Destruction of William Penn's Holy Experiment (Oxford University Press, 2011) p71
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