1757

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1757 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1757
MDCCLVII
Ab urbe condita 2510
Armenian calendar 1206
ԹՎ ՌՄԶ
Assyrian calendar 6507
Balinese saka calendar 1678–1679
Bengali calendar 1164
Berber calendar 2707
British Regnal year 30  Geo. 2   31  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2301
Burmese calendar 1119
Byzantine calendar 7265–7266
Chinese calendar 丙子年 (Fire  Rat)
4453 or 4393
     to 
丁丑年 (Fire  Ox)
4454 or 4394
Coptic calendar 1473–1474
Discordian calendar 2923
Ethiopian calendar 1749–1750
Hebrew calendar 5517–5518
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1813–1814
 - Shaka Samvat 1678–1679
 - Kali Yuga 4857–4858
Holocene calendar 11757
Igbo calendar 757–758
Iranian calendar 1135–1136
Islamic calendar 1170–1171
Japanese calendar Hōreki 7
(宝暦7年)
Javanese calendar 1682–1683
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4090
Minguo calendar 155 before ROC
民前155年
Nanakshahi calendar 289
Thai solar calendar 2299–2300
Tibetan calendar 阳火鼠年
(male Fire-Rat)
1883 or 1502 or 730
     to 
阴火牛年
(female Fire-Ox)
1884 or 1503 or 731
May 6: Battle of Prague The Battle of Prague in Bohemia, 6th May, 1757.png
May 6: Battle of Prague
June 23: Battle of Plassey Clive.jpg
June 23: Battle of Plassey
December 5: Battle of Leuthen Prussian infantry advance at Leuthen.jpg
December 5: Battle of Leuthen

1757 (MDCCLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1757th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 757th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1757, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton portrait by John Trumbull 1806.jpg
Alexander Hamilton
Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette Gilbert du Motier Marquis de Lafayette.PNG
Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette
William Blake William Blake by Thomas Phillips.jpg
William Blake

Date unknown

Deaths

Sophia Dorothea of Hanover Queen Sophie Dorothea of Prussia.jpg
Sophia Dorothea of Hanover
Sultan Osman III OsmanIII.jpg
Sultan Osman III

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1756</span> Calendar year

1756 (MDCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1756th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 756th year of the 2nd millennium, the 56th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1756, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1809</span> Calendar year

1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1809th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 809th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1809, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1806</span> Calendar year

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1750s</span> Decade

The 1750s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1750, and ended on December 31, 1759. The 1750s was a pioneering decade. Waves of settlers flooded the New World in hopes of re-establishing life away from European control, and electricity was a field of novelty that had yet to be merged with the studies of chemistry and engineering. Numerous discoveries of the 1750s forged the basis for contemporary scientific consensus. The decade saw the end of the Baroque period.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1760</span> Calendar year

1760 (MDCCLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1760th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 760th year of the 2nd millennium, the 60th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1760, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">War of the Austrian Succession</span> Dynastic war in Austria from 1740–48

The War of the Austrian Succession, was a European conflict that took place between 1740 and 1748. Fought primarily in Central Europe, the Austrian Netherlands, Italy, the Atlantic and Mediterranean, related conflicts included King George's War in North America, the War of Jenkins' Ear, the First Carnatic War and the First and Second Silesian Wars.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Rossbach</span> 1757 battle of the Third Silesian War

The Battle of Rossbach took place on 5 November 1757 during the Third Silesian War near the village of Rossbach (Roßbach), in the Electorate of Saxony. It is sometimes called the Battle of, or at, Reichardtswerben, after a different nearby town. In this 90-minute battle, Frederick the Great, king of Prussia, defeated an Allied army composed of French forces augmented by a contingent of the Reichsarmee of the Holy Roman Empire. The French and Imperial army included 41,110 men, opposing a considerably smaller Prussian force of 22,000. Despite overwhelming odds, Frederick employed rapid movement, a flanking maneuver and oblique order to achieve complete surprise.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Hastenbeck</span> 1757 battle

The Battle of Hastenbeck was fought as part of the Invasion of Hanover during the Seven Years' War between the allied forces of Hanover, Hesse-Kassel and Brunswick, and the French. The allies were defeated by the French army near Hamelin in the Electorate of Hanover.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Prince Charles Alexander of Lorraine</span> 18th-century Austrian army officer and governor of the Austrian Netherlands

Prince Charles Alexander Emanuel of Lorraine was a Lorraine-born Austrian general and soldier, field marshal of the Imperial Army, and governor of the Austrian Netherlands.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Treaty of Hubertusburg</span> Treaty ending the Third Silesian War

The Treaty of Hubertusburg was signed on 15 February 1763 at Hubertusburg Castle by Prussia, Austria and Saxony to end the Third Silesian War. Together with the Treaty of Paris, signed five days earlier, it marked the end of the Seven Years' War. The treaty ended the continental conflict with no significant changes in prewar borders. Austria and Saxony renounced all claims to the Silesian territories ceded to Prussia in the 1742 Treaty of Berlin and the 1745 Treaty of Dresden. Prussia clearly stood among the ranks of the European great powers, while the treaty enhanced the rivalry with Austria.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Kolín</span> 1757 battle of the Seven Years War

The Battle of Kolín on 18 June 1757 saw 54,000 Austrians under Count von Daun defeat 34,000 Prussians under Frederick the Great during the Third Silesian War. Prussian attempts to turn the Austrian right flank turned into piecemeal frontal attacks and were defeated in five and a half hours of combat. The Prussians lost 13,700 men, the Austrians 8,100. Frederick gave up the siege of Prague as well as his planned march on Vienna and retreated to Saxony. Daun did not pursue.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Gross-Jägersdorf</span> Part of the Seven Years War

The Battle of Gross-Jägersdorf was a victory for the Russian force under Field Marshal Stepan Fyodorovich Apraksin over a smaller Prussian force commanded by Field Marshal Hans von Lehwaldt, during the Seven Years' War. This was the first battle in which Russia engaged during the Seven Years' War.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Breslau (1757)</span>

The Battle of Breslau was a battle fought on 22 November 1757 in Breslau during the Third Silesian War. A Prussian army of 28,000 men fought an Austrian army of 84,000 men. The Prussians held off the Austrian attack, losing 6,000 men to the Austrians 5,000 men. But one day later the Prussians beat a retreat. Breslau's garrison surrendered on 25 November 1757.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Zorndorf</span> Battle during the Seven Years War

The Battle of Zorndorf, during the Seven Years' War, was fought on 25 August 1758 between Russian troops commanded by Count William Fermor and a Prussian army commanded by King Frederick the Great. The battle was tactically inconclusive, with both armies holding their ground and claiming victory. The site of the battle was the Prussian village of Zorndorf. During the battle, Frederick famously took a regimental standard and led an attack himself, rallying his troops.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Hochkirch</span> 1758 battle of the Third Silesian War

The Battle of Hochkirch took place on 14 October 1758, during the Third Silesian War. After several weeks of maneuvering for position, an Austrian army of 80,000 commanded by Lieutenant Field Marshal Leopold Josef Graf Daun surprised the Prussian army of 30,000–36,000 commanded by Frederick the Great. The Austrian army overwhelmed the Prussians and forced a general retreat. The battle took place in and around the village of Hochkirch, 9 kilometers (6 mi) east of Bautzen, Saxony.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel</span>

Ferdinand, Prince of Brunswick-Lüneburg, was a German-Prussian field marshal (1758–1766) known for his participation in the Seven Years' War. From 1757 to 1762 he led an Anglo-German army in Western Germany which successfully repelled French attempts to occupy Hanover.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Seven Years' War</span> Global conflict between Great Britain and France (1756–1763)

The Seven Years' War (1754/1756–1763) was a global conflict involving most of the major European powers and many smaller European states, as well as nations in Asia and the Americas. The most powerful belligerents in each of the opposing alliances were Great Britain and France, with both seeking to establish global pre-eminence at the expense of the other power. Along with Spain, France fought Great Britain both in Europe and overseas with land-based armies and naval forces, while Britain's ally Prussia sought territorial expansion in Europe and consolidation of its power. Long-standing colonial rivalries pitting Britain against France and Spain in North America and the West Indies were fought on a grand scale with consequential results. In Europe, the conflict arose from issues left unresolved by the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–1748). Prussia sought greater influence in the German states, while Austria wanted to regain Silesia, captured by Prussia in the previous war, and to contain Prussian influence.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Third Silesian War</span> 1756-63 conflict between Prussia and Austria; theatre of the Seven Years War

The Third Silesian War was a war between Prussia and Austria that lasted from 1756 to 1763 and confirmed Prussia's control of the region of Silesia. The war was fought mainly in Silesia, Bohemia and Upper Saxony and formed one theatre of the Seven Years' War. It was the last of three Silesian Wars fought between Frederick the Great's Prussia and Maria Theresa's Austria in the mid-18th century, all three of which ended in Prussian control of Silesia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Great Britain in the Seven Years' War</span> Role Great Britain played in the Seven Years War

Great Britain was one of the major participants in the Seven Years' War, which in fact lasted nine years, between 1754 and 1763. British involvement in the conflict began in 1754 in what became known as the French and Indian War. However the warfare in the European theater involving countries other than Britain and France commenced in 1756. Britain emerged from the war as the world's leading colonial power, having gained all of New France in North America, ending France's role as a colonial power there. Following Spain's entry in the war in alliance with France in the third Family Compact, Britain captured the major Spanish ports of Havana, Cuba and Manila, in the Philippines in 1762, and agreed to return them in exchange for Florida, previously controlled by Spain. The Treaty of Paris in 1763 formally ended the conflict and Britain established itself as the world's pre-eminent naval power.

Events from the year 1757 in France.

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