1758

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1758 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1758
MDCCLVIII
Ab urbe condita 2511
Armenian calendar 1207
ԹՎ ՌՄԷ
Assyrian calendar 6508
Balinese saka calendar 1679–1680
Bengali calendar 1165
Berber calendar 2708
British Regnal year 31  Geo. 2   32  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2302
Burmese calendar 1120
Byzantine calendar 7266–7267
Chinese calendar 丁丑(Fire  Ox)
4454 or 4394
     to 
戊寅年 (Earth  Tiger)
4455 or 4395
Coptic calendar 1474–1475
Discordian calendar 2924
Ethiopian calendar 1750–1751
Hebrew calendar 5518–5519
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1814–1815
 - Shaka Samvat 1679–1680
 - Kali Yuga 4858–4859
Holocene calendar 11758
Igbo calendar 758–759
Iranian calendar 1136–1137
Islamic calendar 1171–1172
Japanese calendar Hōreki 8
(宝暦8年)
Javanese calendar 1683–1684
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4091
Minguo calendar 154 before ROC
民前154年
Nanakshahi calendar 290
Thai solar calendar 2300–2301
Tibetan calendar 阴火牛年
(female Fire-Ox)
1884 or 1503 or 731
     to 
阳土虎年
(male Earth-Tiger)
1885 or 1504 or 732
June 8: Siege of Louisbourg British burninng warship Prudent and capturing Bienfaisant. Siege of Louisbourg 1758. Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, M55.7.1.jpg
June 8: Siege of Louisbourg

1758 ( MDCCLVIII ) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar , the 1758th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 758th year of the 2nd millennium , the 58th year of the 18th century , and the 9th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1758, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Carl Linnaeus Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist

Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné, was a Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist who formalised binomial nomenclature, the modern system of naming organisms. He is known as the "father of modern taxonomy". Many of his writings were in Latin, and his name is rendered in Latin as Carolus Linnæus.

Binomial nomenclature, also called binominal nomenclature or binary nomenclature, is a formal system of naming species of living things by giving each a name composed of two parts, both of which use Latin grammatical forms, although they can be based on words from other languages. Such a name is called a binomial name, a binomen, binominal name or a scientific name; more informally it is also called a Latin name. The first part of the name – the generic name – identifies the genus to which the species belongs, while the second part – the specific name or specific epithet – identifies the species within the genus. For example, humans belong to the genus Homo and within this genus to the species Homo sapiens. Tyrannosaurus rex is probably the most widely known binomial. The formal introduction of this system of naming species is credited to Carl Linnaeus, effectively beginning with his work Species Plantarum in 1753. But Gaspard Bauhin, in as early as 1622, had introduced in his book Pinax theatri botanici many names of genera that were later adopted by Linnaeus.

AprilJune

April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 246 days remain until the end of the year.

For other battles with this name, see Battle of Cuddalore (disambiguation)

George Pocock Royal Navy admiral

Admiral Sir George Pocock, KB was a British officer of the Royal Navy.

June 23: Battle of Krefeld Schlacht-bei-krefeld.jpg
June 23: Battle of Krefeld

June 23 is the 174th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 191 days remain until the end of the year.

Battle of Krefeld battle

The Battle of Krefeld was a battle fought on 23 June 1758 between a Prussian-Hanoverian army and a French army during the Seven Years' War.

June 30 is the 181st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 184 days remain until the end of the year.

JulySeptember

July 6 is the 187th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 178 days remain until the end of the year.

Pope Clement XIII pope of the catholic church 1758–1769

Pope Clement XIII, born Carlo della Torre di Rezzonico, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 6 July 1758 to his death in 1769. He was installed on 16 July 1758.

Pope Benedict XIV 18th-century Catholic pope

Pope Benedict XIV, born Prospero Lorenzo Lambertini, was head of the Catholic Church from 17 August 1740 to his death in 1758.

August 3: Battle of Zorndorf Friedrich II in der Schlacht bei Zorndorf Copy after Carl Rochling.jpg
August 3: Battle of Zorndorf
October 14: Battle of Hochkirch Menzelhochkirch.jpg
October 14: Battle of Hochkirch

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

James Monroe James Monroe White House portrait 1819.jpg
James Monroe
Maximilien Robespierre Robespierre crop.jpg
Maximilien Robespierre
Thomas Picton Lieutenant-General Sir Thomas Picton A17581.jpg
Thomas Picton
Christopher Gore ChristopherGoreByTrumbull.jpg
Christopher Gore
Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson HoratioNelson1.jpg
Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson
Noah Webster Noah Webster pre-1843 IMG 4412 Cropped.JPG
Noah Webster

Date unknown

Probable

Deaths

Jonathan Edwards Jonathan Edwards.jpg
Jonathan Edwards
Marthanda Varma Marthanda Vurmah Maha Rajah.png
Marthanda Varma
James Francis Edward Keith Generalfeldmarschall Keith (Pesne).jpg
James Francis Edward Keith
Francoise de Graffigny Francoisedegraffigny.jpg
Françoise de Graffigny

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1626 Year

1626 (MDCXXVI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1626th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 626th year of the 2nd millennium, the 26th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1626, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1648 Year

1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1648th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 648th year of the 2nd millennium, the 48th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1648, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1796 Year

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1752 Year

1752 (MDCCLII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1752nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 752nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1752, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the British Empire, it was the only year with 355 days, as 3–13 September were skipped when the Empire adopted the Gregorian calendar.

1757 Year

1757 (MDCCLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1757th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 757th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1757, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 Year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 12 days until February 28, 1900.

1632 Year

1632 (MDCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1632nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 632nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 32nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1632, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1711 Year

1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1711th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 711th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1711, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Sunday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1777 Year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1775 Year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. Birth of Sir Dingo of Dundee May 17, 1775. The first confirmed case of cancer occurred in Ella O Leary that year.

1763 Year

1763 (MDCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1763rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 763rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1763, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1759 Year

1759 (MDCCLIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1759th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 759th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1759, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In Great Britain, this year was known as the Annus Mirabilis, because of British victories in the Seven Years' War.

1739 Year

1739 (MDCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1739th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 739th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1739, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1724 Year

1724 (MDCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1724th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 724th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1724, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1645 Year

1645 (MDCXLV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1645th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 645th year of the 2nd millennium, the 45th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1645, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1719 Year

1719 (MDCCXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1719th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 719th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1719, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1708 Year

1708 (MDCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1708th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 708th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1708, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a leap year starting on Wednesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1672 Year

1672 (MDCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1672nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 672nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 72nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1672, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1776 Year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1757 in France.

References

  1. Niles Eldredge, Life on Earth: A-G (ABC-CLIO, 2002) pp477-478
  2. "The Use of Numerals for Specific Names in Systematic Zoology", by David Starr Jordan, in Science magazine, March 10, 1911, p372
  3. Shelby T. McCloy, The Negro in the French West Indies (University Press of Kentucky, 2015) p40
  4. Herbert J. Redman, Frederick the Great and the Seven Years’ War, 1756–1763 (McFarland, 2015) p191
  5. Stephen Feinstein, Captain Cook: Great Explorer of the Pacific (Enslow Publishers, 2010) p28
  6. "Edwards, Jonathan", by Douglas A. Sweeney, in Encyclopedia of Christianity in the United States (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016) p770
  7. Donald E. Chipman and Harriet Denise Joseph, Explorers and Settlers of Spanish Texas (University of Texas Press, 2010)
  8. "Eraser", in Concise Encyclopedia of Plastics, ed by Donald V. Rosato, et al. (Springer, 2000) p237
  9. "Historical Events for Year 1758 | OnThisDay.com". Historyorb.com. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  10. Gordon Carruth, ed., The Encyclopedia of American Facts and Dates 3rd Edition (Thomas Y. Crowell, 1962) p72