1759

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
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Years:
1759 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1759
MDCCLIX
Ab urbe condita 2512
Armenian calendar 1208
ԹՎ ՌՄԸ
Assyrian calendar 6509
Balinese saka calendar 1680–1681
Bengali calendar 1166
Berber calendar 2709
British Regnal year 32  Geo. 2   33  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2303
Burmese calendar 1121
Byzantine calendar 7267–7268
Chinese calendar 戊寅(Earth  Tiger)
4455 or 4395
     to 
己卯年 (Earth  Rabbit)
4456 or 4396
Coptic calendar 1475–1476
Discordian calendar 2925
Ethiopian calendar 1751–1752
Hebrew calendar 5519–5520
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1815–1816
 - Shaka Samvat 1680–1681
 - Kali Yuga 4859–4860
Holocene calendar 11759
Igbo calendar 759–760
Iranian calendar 1137–1138
Islamic calendar 1172–1173
Japanese calendar Hōreki 9
(宝暦9年)
Javanese calendar 1684–1685
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4092
Minguo calendar 153 before ROC
民前153年
Nanakshahi calendar 291
Thai solar calendar 2301–2302
Tibetan calendar 阳土虎年
(male Earth-Tiger)
1885 or 1504 or 732
     to 
阴土兔年
(female Earth-Rabbit)
1886 or 1505 or 733
January 15: British Museum opens. British Museum from NE 2.JPG
January 15: British Museum opens.

1759 ( MDCCLIX ) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar , the 1759th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 759th year of the 2nd millennium , the 59th year of the 18th century , and the 10th and last year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1759, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In Great Britain, this year was known as the Annus Mirabilis , because of British victories in the Seven Years' War.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 6 is the sixth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 359 days remaining until the end of the year.

George Washington 1st president of the United States

George Washington was an American political leader, military general, statesman, and Founding Father who also served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797. He led Patriot forces to victory in the nation's War of Independence, and he presided at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 which established the new federal government. He has been called the "Father of His Country" for his manifold leadership in the formative days of the new nation.

January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 354 days remaining until the end of the year.

AprilJune

April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 261 days remaining until the end of the year.

Seven Years War Global conflict between 1756 and 1763

The Seven Years' War was a global conflict fought between 1756 and 1763. It involved every European great power of the time and spanned five continents, affecting Europe, the Americas, West Africa, India, and the Philippines. The conflict split Europe into two coalitions, led by the Kingdom of Great Britain on one side and the Kingdom of France, the Russian Empire, the Kingdom of Spain, and the Swedish Empire on the other. Meanwhile, in India, some regional polities within the increasingly fragmented Mughal Empire, with the support of the French, tried to crush a British attempt to conquer Bengal. The war's extent has led some historians to describe it as World War Zero, similar in scale to other world wars.

Battle of Bergen (1759) battle

The Battle of Bergen on 13 April 1759 saw the French army under de Broglie withstand an allied British, Hanoverian, Hessian, Brunswick army under Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick near Frankfurt-am-Main during the Seven Years' War.

JulySeptember

July 19 is the 200th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 165 days remaining until the end of the year.

Södermalm island and urban district in Stockholm, Sweden

Södermalm, often shortened to “Söder”, is a district and island in central Stockholm.

Stockholm Capital city in Södermanland and Uppland, Sweden

Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and the most populous urban area in the Nordic countries; 962,154 people live in the municipality, approximately 1.5 million in the urban area, and 2.3 million in the metropolitan area. The city stretches across fourteen islands where Lake Mälaren flows into the Baltic Sea. Just outside the city and along the coast is the island chain of the Stockholm archipelago. The area has been settled since the Stone Age, in the 6th millennium BC, and was founded as a city in 1252 by Swedish statesman Birger Jarl. It is also the capital of Stockholm County.

August 12: Battle of Kunersdorf. Kunersdorff.jpg
August 12: Battle of Kunersdorf.

August 12 is the 224th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 141 days remaining until the end of the year.

Battle of Kunersdorf battle

The decisive Battle of Kunersdorf occurred on 12 August 1759 near Kunersdorf (Kunowice), immediately east of Frankfurt an der Oder. Part of the Third Silesian War and the wider Seven Years' War, the battle involved over 100,000 men. An Allied army commanded by Pyotr Saltykov and Ernst Gideon von Laudon that included 41,000 Russians and 18,500 Austrians defeated Frederick the Great's army of 50,900 Prussians.

Frederick the Great king of Prussia

Frederick II ruled the Kingdom of Prussia from 1740 until 1786, the longest reign of any Hohenzollern king. His most significant accomplishments during his reign included his military victories, his reorganization of Prussian armies, his patronage of the arts and the Enlightenment and his final success against great odds in the Seven Years' War. Frederick was the last Hohenzollern monarch titled King in Prussia and declared himself King of Prussia after achieving sovereignty over most historically Prussian lands in 1772. Prussia had greatly increased its territories and became a leading military power in Europe under his rule. He became known as Frederick the Great and was nicknamed Der Alte Fritz by the Prussian people and eventually the rest of Germany.

Sept. 13: Battle - Plains of Abraham. Benjamin West 005.jpg
Sept. 13: Battle Plains of Abraham.

OctoberDecember

November 20: Battle of Quiberon Bay Quibcardinaux2.jpg
November 20: Battle of Quiberon Bay

Date unknown

Births

Mary Wollstonecraft Mary Wollstonecraft by John Opie (c. 1797).jpg
Mary Wollstonecraft
William Wilberforce William wilberforce.jpg
William Wilberforce
Friedrich Schiller Friedrich Schiller by Ludovike Simanowiz.jpg
Friedrich Schiller

Deaths

George Frideric Handel George Frideric Handel by Balthasar Denner.jpg
George Frideric Handel

Related Research Articles

1814 Year

1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1814th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 814th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1814, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1812 Year

1812 (MDCCCXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1812th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 812th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1812, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1806 Year

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1758 Year

1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1758th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 758th year of the 2nd millennium, the 58th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1758, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1777 Year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1760 Year

1760 (MDCCLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1760th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 760th year of the 2nd millennium, the 60th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1760, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Battle of the Plains of Abraham 1759 battle between British and French near Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

The Battle of the Plains of Abraham, also known as the Battle of Quebec, was a pivotal battle in the Seven Years' War. The battle, which began on 13 September 1759, was fought on a plateau by the British Army and Navy against the French Army, just outside the walls of Quebec City on land that was originally owned by a farmer named Abraham Martin, hence the name of the battle. The battle involved fewer than 10,000 troops between both sides, but proved to be a deciding moment in the conflict between France and Britain over the fate of New France, influencing the later creation of Canada.

James Wolfe British Army officer

James Wolfe was a British Army officer, known for his training reforms and remembered chiefly for his victory in 1759 over the French at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in Quebec as a major general. The son of a distinguished general, Edward Wolfe, he received his first commission at a young age and saw extensive service in Europe where he fought during the War of the Austrian Succession. His service in Flanders and in Scotland, where he took part in the suppression of the Jacobite Rebellion, brought him to the attention of his superiors. The advancement of his career was halted by the Peace Treaty of 1748 and he spent much of the next eight years on garrison duty in the Scottish Highlands. Already a brigade major at the age of 18, he was a lieutenant-colonel by 23.

Louis-Joseph de Montcalm French general

Louis-Joseph de Montcalm-Grozon, marquis de Montcalm de Saint-Veran was a French soldier best known as the commander of the forces in North America during the Seven Years' War.

Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester Governor of the Province of Quebec

Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, KB, known between 1776 and 1786 as Sir Guy Carleton, was an Anglo-Irish soldier and administrator. He twice served as Governor of the Province of Quebec, from 1768 to 1778, concurrently serving as Governor General of British North America in that time, and again from 1785 to 1795. The title Baron Dorchester was created on 21 August 1786.

Battle of Ticonderoga (1759) battle

The 1759 Battle of Ticonderoga was a minor confrontation at Fort Carillon on July 26 and 27, 1759, during the French and Indian War. A British military force of more than 11,000 men under the command of General Sir Jeffery Amherst moved artillery to high ground overlooking the fort, which was defended by a garrison of 400 Frenchmen under the command of Brigadier General François-Charles de Bourlamaque.

1759 in Canada

Events from the year 1759 in Canada.

Battle of Fort Niagara siege late in the French and Indian War

The Battle of Fort Niagara was a siege late in the French and Indian War, the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War. The British siege of Fort Niagara in July 1759 was part of a campaign to remove French control of the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley regions, making possible a western invasion of the French province of Canada in conjunction with General James Wolfe's invasion to the east.

Robert Monckton British army officer

Robert Monckton was an officer of the British Army and also a colonial administrator in British North America. He had a distinguished military and political career, being second in command to General Wolfe at the battle of Quebec and later being named the Governor of the Province of New York. Monckton is also remembered for his role in a number of other important events in the French and Indian War, most notably the capture of Fort Beausejour in Acadia, and the island of Martinique in the West Indies, as well as for his role in the deportation of the Acadians from British controlled Nova Scotia and also from French-controlled Acadia. The city of Moncton, New Brunswick, and Fort Monckton in Port Elgin, New Brunswick, are named for him. He sat in the British House of Commons between 1774 and 1782. Although never legally married, he raised and was survived by three sons and a daughter.

François Gaston de Lévis Marshal of France

François-Gaston de Lévis, Duc de Lévis, styled as the Chevalier de Lévis until 1785, was a French noble and a Marshal of France. He served with distinction in the War of the Polish Succession and the War of the Austrian Succession. During the Seven Years' War, he was second-in-command to Louis-Joseph de Montcalm in the defense of New France and then, after the surrender of New France in 1760, he served in Europe. After the war, he was appointed Governor of Artois, and in 1783 he was made a Marshal of France.

1776 Year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1759 in Great Britain. This year was dubbed an "Annus Mirabilis" due to a succession of military victories in the Seven Years' War against French-led opponents.

Siege of Louisbourg (1758) Battle of the French and Indian War

The Siege of Louisbourg was a pivotal operation of the Seven Years' War in 1758 that ended the French colonial era in Atlantic Canada and led directly to the loss of Quebec in 1759 and the remainder of French North America the following year.

Montcalm and Wolfe (ISBN 0-306-80621-5) is the sixth volume in Francis Parkman's seven-volume history, France and England in North America, originally published in 1884. It tells the story of the French and Indian War. Its title refers to Louis-Joseph de Montcalm and James Wolfe, the commanding generals of the French and English forces respectively and to whom the book devotes particular attention. Parkman considered the book his masterpiece.

References

  1. Newman, Frank G. (January 1965). "The Acquisition of a Life Insurance Company". The Business Lawyer. American Bar Association. 20 (2): 411–416. Retrieved 2016-04-04. The first life insurance company in America was organized in 1759 under the corporate title 'The Corporation for Relief of Poor and Distressed Presbyterian Ministers, and of the Poor and Distressed Widows and Children of Presbyterian Ministers'.
  2. 1 2 S. B. Bhattacherje, Encyclopaedia of Indian Events & Dates (Sterling Publishers, 2009) p94
  3. George M. Wrong, The Conquest of New France: A Chronicle of the Colonial Wars (Yale University Press, 1921) p214
  4. 1 2 3 "Quebec, Capture of", in Encyclopedia of Naval History, ed. by Anthony Bruce and William Cogar (Routledge, 2014) p297
  5. Richard Middleton and Anne Lombard, Colonial America: A History to 1763 (John Wiley & Sons, 2011)
  6. "History of Microsurery", by Yoshikazu Ikuta, in Telemicrosurgery: Robot Assisted Microsurgery (Springer, 2012) p5
  7. Steven G. Friedman, MD, A History of Vascular Surgery (John Wiley & Sons, 2008) p ix
  8. "Eddystone Lighthouse". Trinity House. Archived from the original on September 9, 2006. Retrieved 2006-09-06.
  9. "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p53
  10. Royal Observatory Greenwich souvenir guide. 2012. pp. 34–35. ISBN   978-1-906367-51-0. the first precision watch and considered by many today as the most important timekeeper ever.
  11. "Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew". World Heritage . UNESCO. Archived from the original on August 17, 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-04.
  12. "Mary Wollstonecraft | Biography, Works, & Facts". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 10 April 2019.