1764

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1764 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1764
MDCCLXIV
Ab urbe condita 2517
Armenian calendar 1213
ԹՎ ՌՄԺԳ
Assyrian calendar 6514
Balinese saka calendar 1685–1686
Bengali calendar 1171
Berber calendar 2714
British Regnal year 4  Geo. 3   5  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2308
Burmese calendar 1126
Byzantine calendar 7272–7273
Chinese calendar 癸未(Water  Goat)
4460 or 4400
     to 
甲申年 (Wood  Monkey)
4461 or 4401
Coptic calendar 1480–1481
Discordian calendar 2930
Ethiopian calendar 1756–1757
Hebrew calendar 5524–5525
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1820–1821
 - Shaka Samvat 1685–1686
 - Kali Yuga 4864–4865
Holocene calendar 11764
Igbo calendar 764–765
Iranian calendar 1142–1143
Islamic calendar 1177–1178
Japanese calendar Hōreki 14 / Meiwa 1
(明和元年)
Javanese calendar 1689–1690
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4097
Minguo calendar 148 before ROC
民前148年
Nanakshahi calendar 296
Thai solar calendar 2306–2307
Tibetan calendar 阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1890 or 1509 or 737
     to 
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1891 or 1510 or 738
October 22: Battle of Buxar Battle of Buxar -Crown and company- Arthur Edward Mainwaring pg.144.jpg
October 22: Battle of Buxar

1764 ( MDCCLXIV ) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar , the 1764th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 764th year of the 2nd millennium , the 64th year of the 18th century , and the 5th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1764, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are AG, such as the years 1888, 1928, 1956, 1984, 2012, 2040, 2068, 2096, 2108, 2136, 2164, and 2192 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1996 and 2024 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 358 days remaining until the end of the year.

Siculicidium

The Massacre at Madéfalva took place at Csík-Mádéfalva, Grand Principality of Transylvania. In Latin Siculicidium "murder of Székelys" was a mass murder committed against Székelys by the Habsburg army in 1764, under Maria Theresa.

Transylvania Historical region of Romania

Transylvania is a historical region which today is located in central Romania. Bound on the east and south by its natural borders, the Carpathian mountain range, historical Transylvania extended westward to the Apuseni Mountains. The term sometimes encompasses not only Transylvania proper, but also parts of the historical regions of Crișana and Maramureș, and occasionally the Romanian part of Banat.

JulySeptember

July 6 is the 187th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 178 days remaining until the end of the year.

Havana Capital city in La Habana, Cuba

Havana is the capital city, largest city, province, major port, and leading commercial center of Cuba. The city has a population of 2.1 million inhabitants, and it spans a total of 781.58 km2 (301.77 sq mi) – making it the largest city by area, the most populous city, and the fourth largest metropolitan area in the Caribbean region.

Cuba Country in the Caribbean

Cuba, officially the Republic of Cuba, is a country comprising the island of Cuba as well as Isla de la Juventud and several minor archipelagos. Cuba is located in the northern Caribbean where the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean meet. It is east of the Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico), south of both the U.S. state of Florida and the Bahamas, west of Haiti and north of both Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. Havana is the largest city and capital; other major cities include Santiago de Cuba and Camagüey. The area of the Republic of Cuba is 110,860 square kilometres (42,800 sq mi). The island of Cuba is the largest island in Cuba and in the Caribbean, with an area of 105,006 square kilometres (40,543 sq mi), and the second-most populous after Hispaniola, with over 11 million inhabitants.

OctoberDecember

October 15 is the 288th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 77 days remaining until the end of the year.

Edward Gibbon English historian and Member of Parliament

Edward Gibbon FRS was an English historian, writer and Member of Parliament. His most important work, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, was published in six volumes between 1776 and 1788 and is known for the quality and irony of its prose, its use of primary sources, and its polemical criticism of organised religion.

<i>The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire</i> 1776-89 book by English historian, Edward Gibbon

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is a six-volume work by the English historian Edward Gibbon. It traces Western civilization from the height of the Roman Empire to the fall of Byzantium. Volume I was published in 1776 and went through six printings. Volumes II and III were published in 1781; volumes IV, V, and VI in 1788–1789.

Date unknown

Granville County, North Carolina county in North Carolina, United States

Granville County is a county located on the northern border of the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2017 Census, the population was 59,557. Its county seat is Oxford.

Bute County is a former county located in the state of North Carolina. It was formed in 1764 from the eastern part of Granville County. It was named for John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1762 to 1763. In 1779 Bute County was divided into Franklin County and Warren County, and ceased to exist.

John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute 18th-century Prime Minister of Great Britain

John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, was a British nobleman who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1762 to 1763 under George III. He was arguably the last important favourite in British politics. He was the first Prime Minister from Scotland following the Acts of Union in 1707 and the first Tory to have held the post. He was also elected as the first President of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland when it was founded in 1780.

Publications

Cesare Beccaria jurist, philosopher and politician from Italy

Cesare Bonesana di Beccaria, Marquis of Gualdrasco and Villareggio was an Italian criminologist, jurist, philosopher, and politician, who is widely considered as the most talented jurist and one of the greatest thinkers of the Age of Enlightenment. He is well remembered for his treatise On Crimes and Punishments (1764), which condemned torture and the death penalty, and was a founding work in the field of penology and the Classical School of criminology. Beccaria is considered the father of modern criminal law and the father of criminal justice.

<i>On Crimes and Punishments</i> work of Cesare Beccaria

On Crimes and Punishments, is a treatise written by Cesare Beccaria in 1764.

Penology section of criminology that deals with the philosophy and practice of various societies in their attempts to repress criminal activities, and satisfy public opinion via an appropriate treatment regime for persons convicted of criminal offences

Penology is a sub-component of criminology that deals with the philosophy and practice of various societies in their attempts to repress criminal activities, and satisfy public opinion via an appropriate treatment regime for persons convicted of criminal offences.

Births

Princess Maria Carolina of Savoy Maria Carolina von Savoyen.jpg
Princess Maria Carolina of Savoy
Princess Elisabeth of France Vigee Le Brun - Elisabeth of France, Versailles.jpg
Princess Élisabeth of France

Deaths

Giuseppe Alessandro Furietti Furietti.jpg
Giuseppe Alessandro Furietti
Tsar Ivan VI of Russia Ivan VI Antonovich (Oranienbaum).jpg
Tsar Ivan VI of Russia
William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire 4th Duke of Devonshire after Hudson.jpg
William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire

Related Research Articles

1756 Year

1756 (MDCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1756th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 756th year of the 2nd millennium, the 56th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1756, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1840 Year

1840 (MDCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1840th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 840th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1840s decade. As of the start of 1840, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1760s decade

The 1760s decade ran from January 1, 1760, to December 31, 1769.

The 1810s decade ran from January 1, 1810, to December 31, 1819.

1765 Year

1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1765th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 765th year of the 2nd millennium, the 65th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1765, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1757 Year

1757 (MDCCLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1757th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 757th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1757, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1814 Year

1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1814th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 814th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1814, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1812 Year

1812 (MDCCCXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1812th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 812th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1812, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1762 Year

1762 (MDCCLXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1762nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 762nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1762, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1767 Year

1767 (MDCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1767th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 767th year of the 2nd millennium, the 67th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1767, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1779 Year

1779 (MDCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1779th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 779th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1779, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1768 Year

1768 (MDCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1768th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 768th year of the 2nd millennium, the 68th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1768, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1763 Year

1763 (MDCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1763rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 763rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1763, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1761 Year

1761 (MDCCLXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1761st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 761st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1761, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1740 Year

1740 (MDCCXL) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1740th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 740th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1740, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1699 Year

1699 (MDCXCIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1699th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 699th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1699, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Royal Proclamation of 1763 British Parliamentary act setting a western border for the American colonies

The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued by King George III on October 7, 1763, following Great Britain's acquisition of French territory in North America after the end of the French and Indian War/Seven Years' War. This proclamation rendered all land grants given by the government to British subjects who fought for the Crown against France worthless. It forbade all settlement west of a line drawn along the Appalachian Mountains, which was delineated as an Indian Reserve.

Treaty of Paris (1763) 1763 treaty that ended the Seven Years War

The Treaty of Paris, also known as the Treaty of 1763, was signed on 10 February 1763 by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement, after Great Britain's victory over France and Spain during the Seven Years' War.

The Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America on September 3, 1783, ended the American Revolutionary War. The treaty set the boundaries between the British Empire in North America and the United States, on lines "exceedingly generous" to the latter. Details included fishing rights and restoration of property and prisoners of war.

The Treaty of Fontainebleau was a secret agreement of 1762 in which France ceded Louisiana to Spain. The treaty followed the last battle in the French and Indian War in North America, the Battle of Signal Hill in September 1762, which confirmed British control of Canada. In Europe, the associated Seven Years' War continued to rage. Having lost Canada, King Louis XV of France proposed to King Charles III of Spain that France should give Spain "the country known as Louisiana, as well as New Orleans and the island in which the city is situated." Charles accepted on November 13, 1762.

References

  1. Derek Beales, Enlightenment and Reform in Eighteenth-Century Europe (I.B.Tauris, 2005) p163
  2. Arthur Cash, John Wilkes: The Scandalous Father of Civil Liberty (Yale University Press, 2008) pp169-170
  3. "Historical Events for Year 1764 | OnThisDay.com". Historyorb.com. Retrieved 2017-06-22.
  4. The Zend-Avesta, translated by James Darmesteter (Clarendon Press, 1880) p xv
  5. John Foreman, The Philippine Islands: A Political, Geographical, Ethnographical, Social and Commercial History of the Philippine Archipelago, Embracing the Whole Period of Spanish Rule, with an Account of the Succeeding American Insular Government (Charles Scribner's Sons, 1906) p97
  6. David Narrett, Adventurism and Empire: The Struggle for Mastery in the Louisiana-Florida Borderlands, 1762-1803 (University of North Carolina, 2015) p34
  7. David Narrett, Adventurism and Empire: The Struggle for Mastery in the Louisiana-Florida Borderlands, 1762-1803 (University of North Carolina, 2015) p26
  8. Brian L. Davies, The Russo-Turkish War, 1768-1774: Catherine II and the Ottoman Empire (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2016)
  9. John B. Dillon, Oddities of Colonial Legislation in America (Robert Douglass Publishing, 1879) p322
  10. "Mozart's Organ Sonatas", by Orlando A. Mansfield, in The Musical Quarterly (Oct/Dec 1922) p570
  11. Gregory Fossedal, Direct Democracy in Switzerland (Routledge, 2018)
  12. Alexander von Humboldt, Political Essay on the Island of Cuba: A Critical Edition, translated by J. Bradford Anderson, et al. (University of Chicago Press, 2011) p110
  13. William Elliot Griffis, The Romance of American Colonization: How the Foundation Stones of Our History Were Laid (W. A. Wilde & Company, 1898) p259
  14. William F. Ganong, A Monograph of the Origins of the Settlements in New Brunswick (J. Hope & Sons, 1904) p190
  15. David Bennett, A Few Lawless Vagabonds: Ethan Allen, the Republic of Vermont, and the American Revolution (Casemate, 2014)
  16. "Gun Violence and School Safety in American Schools", by Daniel Eadens, et al., in The Wiley Handbook of Educational Policy (Wiley Blackwell, 2018) p384
  17. Jaclyn Schildkraut and H. Jaymi Elsass, Mass Shootings: Media, Myths, and Realities (ABC-CLIO, 2016) p30
  18. Electra magazine (November 1885) p332
  19. 1 2 David T. McNab, Circles of Time: Aboriginal Land Rights and Resistance in Ontario (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1999) pp49-50
  20. "Niagara, Treaty of", by Karl S. Hele, in The Encyclopedia of North American Indian Wars, 1607–1890: A Political, Social, and Military History, ed. by Spencer C. Tucker (ABC-CLIO, 2011) p566
  21. Bisha, Robin (2002). Russian Women, 1698-1917 Experience and Expression: An Anthology of Sources. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. pp. 162–163.
  22. Thomas R. Church (Major) 2015 - dtic.mil January 2015 Accessed February 17th, 2018
  23. Manuscripts division University of Michigan Accessed February 17th, 2018