1765

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1765 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1765
MDCCLXV
Ab urbe condita 2518
Armenian calendar 1214
ԹՎ ՌՄԺԴ
Assyrian calendar 6515
Balinese saka calendar 1686–1687
Bengali calendar 1172
Berber calendar 2715
British Regnal year 5  Geo. 3   6  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2309
Burmese calendar 1127
Byzantine calendar 7273–7274
Chinese calendar 甲申(Wood  Monkey)
4461 or 4401
     to 
乙酉年 (Wood  Rooster)
4462 or 4402
Coptic calendar 1481–1482
Discordian calendar 2931
Ethiopian calendar 1757–1758
Hebrew calendar 5525–5526
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1821–1822
 - Shaka Samvat 1686–1687
 - Kali Yuga 4865–4866
Holocene calendar 11765
Igbo calendar 765–766
Iranian calendar 1143–1144
Islamic calendar 1178–1179
Japanese calendar Meiwa 2
(明和2年)
Javanese calendar 1690–1691
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4098
Minguo calendar 147 before ROC
民前147年
Nanakshahi calendar 297
Thai solar calendar 2307–2308
Tibetan calendar 阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1891 or 1510 or 738
     to 
阴木鸡年
(female Wood-Rooster)
1892 or 1511 or 739
August 16: Treaty of Allahabad is signed. Shah 'Alam conveying the grant of the Diwani to Lord Clive.jpg
August 16: Treaty of Allahabad is signed.

1765 ( MDCCLXV ) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar , the 1765th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 765th year of the 2nd millennium , the 65th year of the 18th century , and the 6th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1765, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is F. The current year, 2019, is a common year starting on Tuesday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 2013 and the next such year will be 2030, or, likewise, 2014 and 2025 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Leap years starting on Monday share this characteristic. From July of the year that precedes this year until September in this type of year is the longest period that occurs without a Friday the 13th. Leap years starting on Saturday share this characteristic, from August of the common year that precedes it to October in that type of year.

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Events

JanuaryMarch

January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 342 days remaining until the end of the year.

Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor Holy Roman Emperor

Joseph II was Holy Roman Emperor from August 1765 and sole ruler of the Habsburg lands from November 1780 until his death. He was the eldest son of Empress Maria Theresa and her husband, Emperor Francis I, and the brother of Marie Antoinette. He was thus the first ruler in the Austrian dominions of the House of Lorraine, styled Habsburg-Lorraine. Joseph was a proponent of enlightened absolutism; however, his commitment to modernizing reforms subsequently engendered significant opposition, which resulted in failure to fully implement his programmes. He has been ranked, with Catherine the Great of Russia and Frederick the Great of Prussia, as one of the three great Enlightenment monarchs. His policies are now known as Josephinism. He died with no sons and was succeeded by his younger brother, Leopold II.

Maria Josepha of Bavaria Holy Roman empress

Maria Josepha of Bavaria was Holy Roman Empress, Queen of the Romans, Archduchess of Austria, Grand Duchess of Tuscany, etc. by her marriage to Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor. By birth, she was a Princess and Duchess of Bavaria as the daughter of Charles VII, Holy Roman Emperor, Elector of Bavaria, and Archduchess Maria Amalia of Austria.

AprilJune

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 271 days remaining until the end of the year.

Fort Tombecbe

Fort Tombecbe, also spelled Tombecbee and Tombeché, was a stockade fort located on the Tombigbee River near the border of French Louisiana, in what is now Sumter County, Alabama. It was constructed under the leadership of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville in 1736-37 as trading post about 270 miles (430 km) upriver from Mobile, on an 80-foot (24 m) limestone bluff. Fort Tombecbe was built in Choctaw lands and would play a major role in colonial France's efforts to stop British intrusions into the area. Bienville claimed that the new fort was to protect the Choctaw from the Chickasaw. Tombecbe was a major French outpost and trade depot among the Choctaw, the largest Native American group in the colony.

Epes, Alabama Town in Alabama, United States

Epes is a town in Sumter County, Alabama, United States. Initially called Epes Station, it was incorporated as Epes in 1899. At the 2010 census the population was 192, down from 206 in 2000.

JulyDecember

July 10 is the 191st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 174 days remaining until the end of the year.

George Grenville Prime Minister of Great Britain

George Grenville was a British Whig statesman who rose to the position of Prime Minister of Great Britain. Grenville was born into an influential political family and first entered Parliament in 1741 as an MP for Buckingham. He emerged as one of Cobham's Cubs, a group of young members of Parliament associated with Lord Cobham.

Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham British Prime Minister

Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham,, styled The Hon. Charles Watson-Wentworth before 1733, Viscount Higham between 1733 and 1746, Earl of Malton between 1746 and 1750 and The Marquess of Rockingham in 1750 was a British Whig statesman, most notable for his two terms as Prime Minister of Great Britain. He became the patron of many Whigs, known as the Rockingham Whigs, and served as a leading Whig grandee. He served in only two high offices during his lifetime, but was nonetheless very influential during his one and a half years of service.

Map of India in 1765 showing territories loyal to the Marathas in (Yellow); and the territories of those loyal to the Great Mogul in (Green). IGI1908India1765a.jpg
Map of India in 1765 showing territories loyal to the Marathas in (Yellow); and the territories of those loyal to the Great Mogul in (Green).

August 16 is the 228th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 137 days remaining until the end of the year.

Treaty of Allahabad treaty between the Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II and East India company

The Treaty of Allahabad was signed on 12 August 1765, between the Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II, son of the late Emperor Alamgir II, and Robert Clive, of the East India Company, as a result of the Battle of Buxar of 22 October 1764. The Treaty marks the political and constitutional involvement and the beginning of British rule in India. Based on the terms of the agreement, Alam granted the East India Company Diwani rights, or the right to collect taxes on behalf of the Emperor from the eastern province of Bengal-Bihar-Orissa. Thus East India Company were appointed as the imperial tax collector for the Eastern province (Bengal-Bihar-Orissa). These rights allowed the Company to collect revenue directly from the people of Bengal, Bihar and Orissa. In return, the Company paid an annual tribute of twenty-six lakhs of rupees while securing for Shah Alam II the districts of Kora and Allahabad. The tribute money paid to the emperor was for the maintenance of the Emperor's court in Allahabad. The accord also dictated that Shah Alam be restored to the province of Varanasi as long as he continued to pay certain amount of revenue to the Company. Awadh was returned to Shuja-ud-Daulah, but Allahabad and Kora were taken from him. The Nawab of Awadh also had to pay fifty lakhs of rupees as war indemnity to the East India Company.

Company rule in India rule or dominion of the British East India Company on the Indian subcontinent

Company rule in India refers to the rule or dominion of the British East India Company over parts of the Indian subcontinent. This is variously taken to have commenced in 1757, after the Battle of Plassey, when Mir Jafar, the new Nawab of Bengal enthroned by Robert Clive, became a puppet in the Company's hands; in 1765, when the Company was granted the diwani, or the right to collect revenue, in Bengal and Bihar; or in 1773, when the Company established a capital in Calcutta, appointed its first Governor-General, Warren Hastings, and became directly involved in governance. By 1818, with the defeat of the Marathas, followed by the pensioning of the Peshwa and the annexation of his territories, British supremacy in India was complete.

Date unknown

Births

Nicephore Niepce Joseph Nicephore Niepce.jpg
Nicéphore Niépce
William IV of the United Kingdom William IV crop.jpg
William IV of the United Kingdom
Robert Fulton Fulton.jpg
Robert Fulton

Deaths

Mikhail Lomonosov M.V. Lomonosov by L.Miropolskiy after G.C.Prenner (1787, RAN).jpg
Mikhail Lomonosov

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1760s decade

The 1760s decade ran from January 1, 1760, to December 31, 1769.

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1755 Year

1755 (MDCCLV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1755th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 755th year of the 2nd millennium, the 55th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1755, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1767 Year

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1772 Year

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1766 Year

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1763 Year

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1753 Year

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1751 Year

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References

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  4. Stanley J. Stein and Barbara H. Stein, Apogee of Empire: Spain and New Spain in the Age of Charles III, 1759–1789 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) p69
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  6. Richard Archer, As If an Enemy's Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2010) pp20-21
  7. "Mississippi", by Kathrin Dodds, in Native America: A State-by-State Historical Encyclopedia, ed. by Daniel S. Murphree (ABC-CLIO, 2012) p611
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  9. Edward Robb Ellis, The Epic of New York City: A Narrative History (Basic Books, 2011)
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Further reading