1770

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1770 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1770
MDCCLXX
Ab urbe condita 2523
Armenian calendar 1219
ԹՎ ՌՄԺԹ
Assyrian calendar 6520
Balinese saka calendar 1691–1692
Bengali calendar 1177
Berber calendar 2720
British Regnal year 10  Geo. 3   11  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2314
Burmese calendar 1132
Byzantine calendar 7278–7279
Chinese calendar 己丑(Earth  Ox)
4466 or 4406
     to 
庚寅年 (Metal  Tiger)
4467 or 4407
Coptic calendar 1486–1487
Discordian calendar 2936
Ethiopian calendar 1762–1763
Hebrew calendar 5530–5531
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1826–1827
 - Shaka Samvat 1691–1692
 - Kali Yuga 4870–4871
Holocene calendar 11770
Igbo calendar 770–771
Iranian calendar 1148–1149
Islamic calendar 1183–1184
Japanese calendar Meiwa 7
(明和7年)
Javanese calendar 1695–1696
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4103
Minguo calendar 142 before ROC
民前142年
Nanakshahi calendar 302
Thai solar calendar 2312–2313
Tibetan calendar 阴土牛年
(female Earth-Ox)
1896 or 1515 or 743
     to 
阳金虎年
(male Iron-Tiger)
1897 or 1516 or 744
July 5: Battle of Chesma, painting by Ivan Aivazovsky Chesmabattle.jpg
July 5: Battle of Chesma, painting by Ivan Aivazovsky

1770 ( MDCCLXX ) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar , the 1770th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 770th year of the 2nd millennium , the 70th year of the 18th century , and the 1st year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1770, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

Contents

Events

January March

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Fort George, Bombay

Fort George was an extension to the fortified walls of Bombay built in 1769; it was in the present-day Fort area, to the east of the site of the former Dongri Fort. The hill on which the Dongri fort stood was razed, and in its place Fort George was built. In 1862, the fort was demolished.

The Dongri Fort or the Dongri Hill Fort, locally known as the Irmitri Fort, is a fort in Mumbai, India. It is located in the Dongri area. It came under Maratha rule in 1739. Since then the locals and the church have been looking after the maintenance of the Fort, which was once repaired. Every year, during the month of October, the feast of Our Lady of Fatima is celebrated there. Many People from far off villages come to offer their prayers there. One can take a 360 degree view of the surroundings from this fort, with the Arabian sea at the West, the Vasai Fort at the North, the Borivali National Park at the East, and the Essel World and Water Kingdom at the South.

AprilJune

April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 263 days remaining until the end of the year.

Townshend Acts townshend

The Townshend Acts were a series of British Acts of Parliament passed during 1767 and 1768 and relating to the British in North America. The acts are named after Charles Townshend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who proposed the program. Historians vary slightly as to which acts they include under the heading "Townshend Acts", but five acts are often mentioned:

Frederick North, Lord North Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782

Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford,, better known by his courtesy title Lord North, which he used from 1752 to 1790 was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782. He led Great Britain through most of the American War of Independence. He also held a number of other cabinet posts, including Home Secretary and Chancellor of the Exchequer.

July September

July 1 is the 182nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 183 days remaining until the end of the year.

D/1770 L1, popularly known as Lexell's Comet after its orbit computer Anders Johan Lexell, was a comet discovered by astronomer Charles Messier in June 1770. It is notable for having passed closer to Earth than any other comet in recorded history, approaching to a distance of only 0.015 astronomical units. The comet has not been seen since 1770 and is considered a lost comet.

Earth Third planet from the Sun in the Solar System

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life. According to radiometric dating and other sources of evidence, Earth formed over 4.5 billion years ago. Earth's gravity interacts with other objects in space, especially the Sun and the Moon, Earth's only natural satellite. Earth revolves around the Sun in 365.26 days, a period known as an Earth year. During this time, Earth rotates about its axis about 366.26 times.

OctoberDecember

October 11 is the 284th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 81 days remaining until the end of the year.

Phillis Wheatley American poet

Phillis Wheatley, also spelled Phyllis and Wheatly was the first published African-American female poet. Born in West Africa, she was sold into slavery at the age of seven or eight and transported to North America. She was purchased by the Wheatley family of Boston, who taught her to read and write and encouraged her poetry when they saw her talent.

In English literature, an elegy is a poem of serious reflection, usually a lament for the dead. The Oxford Handbook of the Elegy notes:

For all of its pervasiveness, however, the ‘elegy’ remains remarkably ill-defined: sometimes used as a catch-all to denominate texts of a somber or pessimistic tone, sometimes as a marker for textual monumentalizing, and sometimes strictly as a sign of a lament for the dead.

Date unknown

Births

Manuel Belgrano Manuel Belgrano.JPG
Manuel Belgrano
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Hegel portrait by Schlesinger 1831.jpg
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Ludwig van Beethoven Beethoven.jpg
Ludwig van Beethoven

Deaths

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo Tiepolo, Giovanni Battista - Fresken Treppenhaus des Wurzburger Residenzschlosses, Szenen zur Apotheose des Furstbischofs, Detail Giovanni Battista Tiepolo - 1750-1753.jpg
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
George Whitefield George Whitefield (head).jpg
George Whitefield

Related Research Articles

1648 Year

1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1648th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 648th year of the 2nd millennium, the 48th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1648, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1728 Year

1728 (MDCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1728th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 728th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1728, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 Year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 12 days until 1899.

1685 Year

1685 (MDCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1685th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 685th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1685, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1758 Year

1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1758th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 758th year of the 2nd millennium, the 58th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1758, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1711 Year

1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1711th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 711th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1711, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Sunday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1771 Year

1771 (MDCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1771st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 771st year of the 2nd millennium, the 71st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1771, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1779 Year

1779 (MDCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1779th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 779th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1779, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1778 Year

1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1778th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 778th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1778, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1777 Year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day later Julian calendar.

1773 Year

1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1773rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 773rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 73rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1773, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1772 Year

1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1772nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 772nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 72nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1772, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1769 Year

1769 (MDCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1769th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 769th year of the 2nd millennium, the 69th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1769, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1759 Year

1759 (MDCCLIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1759th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 759th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1759, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In Great Britain, this year was known as the Annus Mirabilis, because of British victories in the Seven Years' War.

1717 Year

1717 (MDCCXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1717th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 717th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1717, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1712 Year

1712 (MDCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1712th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 712th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1712, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it began as a leap year starting on Monday and remained so until Thursday, February 29. By adding a second leap day Sweden reverted to the Julian calendar and the rest of the year was in sync with the Julian calendar. Sweden finally made the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1753. This year has 367 days.

1701 Year

1701 (MDCCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1701st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 701st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1701, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Tuesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

The year 1770 in science and technology involved some significant events.

Events from the year 1770 in Great Britain.

References

  1. Allen Jayne, Jefferson's Declaration of Independence: Origins, Philosophy, and Theology (University Press of Kentucky, 2015) p41
  2. "Bruce, James", in Encyclopædia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume IV (Cambridge University Press, 1911) p676
  3. James Marten, Children in Colonial America (NYU Press, 2007) p173
  4. Gordon Carruth, ed., The Encyclopedia of American Facts and Dates 3rd Edition (Thomas Y. Crowell, 1962) pp78-79
  5. Hinks, Arthur R. (1935). "Nautical time and civil date". The Geographical Journal . 86: 153–157. doi:10.2307/1786590.
  6. Helene Delalex; Alexandre Maral; Nicolas Milovanovic (2016). Marie-Antoinette. Getty Publications. p. 25.
  7. "Nationalism and the Falkland Islands War" . Retrieved 2007-08-19.
  8. "D/1770 L1 (Lexell)". Gary W. Kronk's Cometography. Retrieved 2012-07-02.
  9. Rear, Marjorie (2015). "William Barker. Member of the Right Worshipful Levant Company 1731-1825. A Life in Smyrna" (PDF): 30.
  10. Blondy, Alain; Labat Saint Vincent, Xavier (2014). Malte et Marseille au XVIIIème siècle. La Fondation de Malte. p. 161. ISBN   9781291435467.
  11. Charles D. Rodenbough, Governor Alexander Martin: Biography of a North Carolina Revolutionary War Statesman (McFarland, 2004) p28
  12. Vincent Carretta, Phillis Wheatley: Biography of a Genius in Bondage (University of Georgia Press, 2014) p78
  13. Leonore Loft, Passion, Politics, and Philosophie: Rediscovering J.-P. Brissot (Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002) p55
  14. Dale K. Van Kley, The Religious Origins of the French Revolution: From Calvin to the Civil Constitution, 1560-1791 (Yale University Press, 1996) p249
  15. Antony Strugnell, Diderot’s Politics: A Study of the Evolution of Diderot’s Political Thought after the Encyclopedie (Martinus Nijhoff, 2012) p123

Further reading