1771

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1771 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1771
MDCCLXXI
Ab urbe condita 2524
Armenian calendar 1220
ԹՎ ՌՄԻ
Assyrian calendar 6521
Balinese saka calendar 1692–1693
Bengali calendar 1178
Berber calendar 2721
British Regnal year 11  Geo. 3   12  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2315
Burmese calendar 1133
Byzantine calendar 7279–7280
Chinese calendar 庚寅(Metal  Tiger)
4467 or 4407
     to 
辛卯年 (Metal  Rabbit)
4468 or 4408
Coptic calendar 1487–1488
Discordian calendar 2937
Ethiopian calendar 1763–1764
Hebrew calendar 5531–5532
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1827–1828
 - Shaka Samvat 1692–1693
 - Kali Yuga 4871–4872
Holocene calendar 11771
Igbo calendar 771–772
Iranian calendar 1149–1150
Islamic calendar 1184–1185
Japanese calendar Meiwa 8
(明和8年)
Javanese calendar 1696–1697
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4104
Minguo calendar 141 before ROC
民前141年
Nanakshahi calendar 303
Thai solar calendar 2313–2314
Tibetan calendar 阳金虎年
(male Iron-Tiger)
1897 or 1516 or 744
     to 
阴金兔年
(female Iron-Rabbit)
1898 or 1517 or 745
September 15 - 17:Plague Riot in Moscow Chumbunt.png
September 15 17:Plague Riot in Moscow

1771 ( MDCCLXXI ) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar , the 1771st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 771st year of the 2nd millennium , the 71st year of the 18th century , and the 2nd year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1771, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is F. The current year, 2019, is a common year starting on Tuesday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 2013 and the next such year will be 2030, or, likewise, 2014 and 2025 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Leap years starting on Monday share this characteristic. From July of the year that precedes this year until September in this type of year is the longest period that occurs without a Friday the 13th. Leap years starting on Saturday share this characteristic, from August of the common year that precedes it to October in that type of year.

Contents

Events

January March

January 5 is the fifth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 360 days remaining until the end of the year.

Torghut

The Torghut are one of the four major subgroups of the Four Oirats. The Torghut nobles traced its descent to the Keraite ruler Tooril also many Torghuts descended from the Keraites.

Ubashi Khan

Ubashi Khan was a Torghut-Kalmyk prince and the last Khan of the Kalmyk Khanate. In January 1771, he led the return migration of the majority of the Kalmyk people from the Kalmyk steppe to Dzungaria, their ancestral homeland, then under the control of the Qing Dynasty.

AprilJune

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 271 days remaining until the end of the year.

Moscow Capital city of Russia

Moscow is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 13.2 million residents within the city limits, 17 million within the urban area and 20 million within the metropolitan area. Moscow is one of Russia's federal cities.

Saint Petersburg Federal city in Northwestern, Russia

Saint Petersburg is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with 5 million inhabitants in 2012, part of the Saint Petersburg agglomeration with a population of 6.2 million (2015). An important Russian port on the Baltic Sea, it has a status of a federal subject.

JulySeptember

July 12 is the 193rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 172 days remaining until the end of the year.

First voyage of James Cook combined Royal Navy and Royal Society expedition to the south Pacific

The first voyage of James Cook was a combined Royal Navy and Royal Society expedition to the south Pacific Ocean aboard HMS Endeavour, from 1768 to 1771. It was the first of three Pacific voyages of which Cook was the commander. The aims of this first expedition were to observe the 1769 transit of Venus across the Sun, and to seek evidence of the postulated Terra Australis Incognita or "unknown southern land".

HMS <i>Endeavour</i> Royal Navy research vessel

HMS Endeavour, also known as HM Bark Endeavour, was a British Royal Navy research vessel that Lieutenant James Cook commanded to Australia and New Zealand on his first voyage of discovery from 1768 to 1771.

OctoberDecember

October 9 is the 282nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 83 days remaining until the end of the year.

Dutch Republic Republican predecessor state of the Netherlands from 1581 to 1795

The Dutch Republic, or the United Provinces, was a confederal republic that existed from the formal creation of a confederacy in 1581 by several Dutch provinces—seceded from Spanish rule—until the Batavian Revolution in 1795. It was a predecessor state of the Netherlands and the first Dutch nation state.

<i>Vrouw Maria</i> ship

Vrouw Maria was a Dutch wooden two-masted merchant ship carrying a valuable cargo of art objects, captained by Raymund Lourens, that sank on October 9, 1771, in the outer archipelago of the municipality of Nagu, Finland, 11 kilometers south-east of the island of Jurmo. In 1999, the ship was discovered by the members of Pro Vrouw Maria, led by Rauno Koivusaari. A dispute between the discoverers and the authorities was later resolved. The ship was in good condition when it was discovered, but only six objects from the deck of the ship have been salvaged. The cargo holds have not been disturbed, so the condition of any art on board remains unknown. The Finnish National Board of Antiquities is responsible for the ship and all recovery efforts.

Date unknown

Baden-Baden Place in Baden-Württemberg, Germany

Baden-Baden is a spa town in the state of Baden-Württemberg, south-western Germany, at the north-western border of the Black Forest mountain range on the small river Oos, ten kilometres east of the Rhine, the border with France, and forty kilometres north-east of Strasbourg, France.

Charles Frederick, Grand Duke of Baden German noble

Charles Frederick was Margrave, Elector and later Grand Duke of Baden from 1738 until his death.

Iceland island republic in Northern Europe

Iceland is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic, with a population of 348,580 and an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík, with Reykjavík and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country being home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, and many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence keep summers chilly, with most of the archipelago having a tundra climate.

Births

Robert Owen Portrait of Robert Owen.png
Robert Owen
Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover Ernest Augustus I of Hanover.PNG
Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover

Deaths

Rev. Samuel Phillips RevSamuelPhillips2.jpg
Rev. Samuel Phillips
Christopher Smart Christopher Smart.jpg
Christopher Smart
Giovanni Battista Morgagni Giambattista morgagni.gif
Giovanni Battista Morgagni

Related Research Articles

The 1770s decade ran from January 1, 1770, to December 31, 1779.

1800 Year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 12 days until 1899.

1821 Year

1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1821st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 821st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1821, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1716 Year

1716 (MDCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1716th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 716th year of the 2nd millennium, the 16th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1716, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1665 Year

1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1665th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 665th year of the 2nd millennium, the 65th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1665, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1793 Year

1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1793rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 793rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1793, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. The French Republic introduced the French Revolutionary Calendar starting with the year I.

1711 Year

1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1711th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 711th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1711, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Sunday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1779 Year

1779 (MDCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1779th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 779th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1779, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1772 Year

1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1772nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 772nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 72nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1772, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1753 Year

1753 (MDCCLIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1753rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 753rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 53rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1753, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1722 Year

1722 (MDCCXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1722nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 722nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 22nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1722, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1710 Year

1710 (MDCCX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1710th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 710th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1710, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Saturday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1651 Year

1651 (MDCLI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1651st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 651st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1651, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1717 Year

1717 (MDCCXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1717th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 717th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1717, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1713 Year

1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1713th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 713th year of the 2nd millennium, the 13th year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1713, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1702 (MDCCII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1702nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 702nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1702, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Wednesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1678 Year

1678 (MDCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1678th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 678th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1678, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

William Tryon British general and governor of North Carolina and New York

William Tryon was a British general officer and a colonial official who served as the 39th Governor of New York from 1771 to 1780, assuming the office after having served as the eighth Governor of North-Carolina from 1765 to 1771.

Claude Joseph Sauthier (1736–1802) was an illustrator, draftsman, surveyor, and mapmaker. He was employed by the British colonial government in the American colonies prior to and during the American Revolutionary War.

Battle of Alamance

The Battle of Alamance was the final battle of the War of the Regulation, a rebellion in colonial North Carolina over issues of taxation and local control. Some historians in the late nineteenth-early twentieth centuries considered the battle to be the opening salvo of the American Revolution, and locals agreed with this assessment. Yet, this has been questioned by present-day historians arguing that the Regulators were not intending a complete overthrow of His Majesty's Government in North Carolina. They were only standing up against those certain local officials who had become corrupt and unworthy tools of the King, and they only turned to riot and armed rebellion as a last resort when all other peaceful means through petitions, elections to the Assembly, etc. had failed to redress their grievances. Many surviving ex-Regulators became loyalists during the Revolution, and several anti-Regulators [e.g. William Hooper, Alexander Martin, and Francis Nash] became patriots during the Revolution. Named for nearby Great Alamance Creek, the battle took place in what was then Orange County and has since become Alamance County in the central Piedmont about 6 miles (9.7 km) south of present-day Burlington, North Carolina.

References

  1. Watson, Garth (1989). The Smeatonians: The Society of Civil Engineers. London: Thomas Telford. ISBN   0-7277-1526-7.
  2. Roberts, Gwilym (1995). From Kendal's Coffee House to Great George Street. London: Thomas Telford. ISBN   0-7277-2022-8.
  3. John T. Alexander, Bubonic Plague in Early Modern Russia: Public Health and Urban Disaster (Oxford University Press, 2002) p150, p257
  4. Ian R. Christie, Myth and Reality in Late-eighteenth-century British Politics: And Other Papers (University of California Press, 1970) pp244-245
  5. "Ukraine". World Statesmen. 2000. Retrieved 2011-11-01.
  6. "Horsham Cricket Club History". Horsham Cricket Club. Archived from the original on February 26, 2012. Retrieved 2011-11-01.
  7. Gerald Horne, The Counter-Revolution of 1776: Slave Resistance and the Origins of the United States of America (NYU Press, 2014) p210
  8. Richmond F. Brown, Coastal Encounters: The Transformation of the Gulf South in the Eighteenth Century (University of Nebraska Press, 2007) pp59-62

Further reading