1776

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1776 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1776
MDCCLXXVI
Ab urbe condita 2529
Armenian calendar 1225
ԹՎ ՌՄԻԵ
Assyrian calendar 6526
Balinese saka calendar 1697–1698
Bengali calendar 1183
Berber calendar 2726
British Regnal year 16  Geo. 3   17  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2320
Burmese calendar 1138
Byzantine calendar 7284–7285
Chinese calendar 乙未(Wood  Goat)
4472 or 4412
     to 
丙申年 (Fire  Monkey)
4473 or 4413
Coptic calendar 1492–1493
Discordian calendar 2942
Ethiopian calendar 1768–1769
Hebrew calendar 5536–5537
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1832–1833
 - Shaka Samvat 1697–1698
 - Kali Yuga 4876–4877
Holocene calendar 11776
Igbo calendar 776–777
Iranian calendar 1154–1155
Islamic calendar 1189–1190
Japanese calendar An'ei 5
(安永5年)
Javanese calendar 1701–1702
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4109
Minguo calendar 136 before ROC
民前136年
Nanakshahi calendar 308
Thai solar calendar 2318–2319
Tibetan calendar 阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
1902 or 1521 or 749
     to 
阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1903 or 1522 or 750
July 4: American Declaration of Independence. Declaration of Independence (1819), by John Trumbull.jpg
July 4: American Declaration of Independence.

1776 ( MDCCLXXVI ) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar , the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium , the 76th year of the 18th century , and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Monday is any year with 366 days that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are GF, such as the years 1912, 1940, 1968, 1996, 2024, 2052, 2080, and 2120 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2008, 2036, and 2064 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Common years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

Contents

Events

JanuaryFebruary

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

American Revolutionary War War between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, which won independence as the United States of America

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was an 18th-century war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America.

Burning of Norfolk

The Burning of Norfolk was an incident that occurred on January 1, 1776, during the American Revolutionary War. British Royal Navy ships in the harbor of Norfolk, Virginia began shelling the town, and landing parties came ashore to burn specific properties. The town, whose significantly Tory (Loyalist) population had fled, was occupied by Whig (Revolutionary) forces from Virginia and North Carolina. Although these forces worked to drive off the landing parties, they did nothing to impede the progress of the flames, and began burning and looting Tory properties.

MarchApril

March is the third month of the year and named after Mars in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is the second of seven months to have a length of 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological beginning of spring occurs on the first day of March. The March equinox on the 20 or 21 marks the astronomical beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, where September is the seasonal equivalent of the Northern Hemisphere's March. Birthday Number the letter "M".

Cereal Grass of which the fruits are used as grain, or said fruits

A cereal is any grass cultivated for the edible components of its grain, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran. The term may also refer to the resulting grain itself. Cereal grain crops are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop and are therefore staple crops. Edible grains from other plant families, such as buckwheat (Polygonaceae), quinoa (Amaranthaceae) and chia (Lamiaceae), are referred to as pseudocereals.

Sweden constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Sweden, formal name: the Kingdom of Sweden, is a Scandinavian Nordic country in Northern Europe. It borders Norway to the west and north and Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest by a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund, a strait at the Swedish-Danish border. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the largest country in Northern Europe, the third-largest country in the European Union and the fifth largest country in Europe by area. Sweden has a total population of 10.2 million of which 2.5 million have a foreign background. It has a low population density of 22 inhabitants per square kilometre (57/sq mi). The highest concentration is in the southern half of the country.

MayJune

May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 244 days remain until the end of the year.

Adam Weishaupt German philosopher and founder of the Order of Illuminati

Johann Adam Weishaupt was a German philosopher, professor, and founder of the Order of the Illuminati, a secret society.

Illuminati Enlightenment-era secret society founded on 1st May 1776

The Illuminati is a name given to several groups, both real and fictitious. Historically, the name usually refers to the Bavarian Illuminati, an Enlightenment-era secret society founded on 1 May 1776. The society's goals were to oppose superstition, obscurantism, religious influence over public life, and abuses of state power. "The order of the day," they wrote in their general statutes, "is to put an end to the machinations of the purveyors of injustice, to control them without dominating them." The Illuminati—along with Freemasonry and other secret societies—were outlawed through edict by the Bavarian ruler Charles Theodore with the encouragement of the Catholic Church, in 1784, 1785, 1787, and 1790. In the following several years, the group was vilified by conservative and religious critics who claimed that they continued underground and were responsible for the French Revolution.

JulyAugust

July 2 is the 183rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 182 days remain until the end of the year.

Lee Resolution

The Lee Resolution was the formal assertion passed by the Second Continental Congress on July 2, 1776 which declared the establishment of a new country of United Colonies as independent from the British Empire, creating what became the United States of America. News of this act was published that evening in the Pennsylvania Evening Post and the next day in the Pennsylvania Gazette. The text of the document formally announcing this action was the Declaration of Independence, approved two days later on July 4, 1776, which is celebrated as Independence Day.

July 4 is the 185th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 180 days remain until the end of the year. The Aphelion, the point in the year when the Earth is farthest from the Sun, occurs around this date.

SeptemberOctober

September 22: British hang spy Nathan Hale in New York City. Nathan Hale hanged by British 1776.gif
September 22: British hang spy Nathan Hale in New York City.

NovemberDecember

December 26: Capture of the Hessians at Trenton The Capture of the Hessians at Trenton December 26 1776.jpeg
December 26: Capture of the Hessians at Trenton

Births

E. T. A. Hoffmann E. T. A. Hoffmann, autorretrato.jpg
E. T. A. Hoffmann
Ioannis Kapodistrias Kapodistrias2.jpg
Ioannis Kapodistrias
Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz Grassi, Josef Mathias - Luise von Mecklenburg-Strelitz.jpg
Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
John Constable John Constable by Daniel Gardner, 1796.JPG
John Constable
Amedeo Avogadro Avogadro Amedeo.jpg
Amedeo Avogadro
Yashwantrao Holkar Yashwant Rao Holkar I.jpg
Yashwantrao Holkar
Johann Wilhelm Ritter Ritter-Johann-Wilhelm-1804.jpg
Johann Wilhelm Ritter

Deaths

James Gabriel Montresor died 6 January James G Montresor bw.jpg
James Gabriel Montresor died 6 January
John Harrison died 24 March John Harrison Uhrmacher.jpg
John Harrison died 24 March
Jacques Saly died 4 May Jens Juel 002.jpg
Jacques Saly died 4 May
Duchess Maria Anna Josepha of Bavaria died 7 May Desmarees - Maria Anna of Bavaria, Rastatt.jpg
Duchess Maria Anna Josepha of Bavaria died 7 May
Countess Palatine Francisca Christina of Sulzbach died 16 July Francisca Christina of the Palatinate-Sulzbach princess-abbess of Essen and Thorn.JPG
Countess Palatine Francisca Christina of Sulzbach died 16 July
David Hume died 25 August Painting of David Hume.jpg
David Hume died 25 August

Related Research Articles

1789 Year

1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1789th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 789th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1789, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1796 Year

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1752 Year

1752 (MDCCLII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1752nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 752nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1752, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the British Empire, it was the only year with 355 days, as 3–13 September were skipped when the Empire adopted the Gregorian calendar.

1792 Year

1792 (MDCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1792nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 792nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1792, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 Year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 12 days until February 28, 1900.

1805 Year

1805 (MDCCCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1805th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 805th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1805, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. After thirteen years the First French Empire abolished the French Republican Calendar in favour of the Gregorian calendar.

1758 Year

1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1758th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 758th year of the 2nd millennium, the 58th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1758, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1793 Year

1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1793rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 793rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1793, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. The French Republic introduced the French Revolutionary Calendar starting with the year I.

1781 Year

1781 (MDCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1781st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 781st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1781, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1799 Year

1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1799th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 799th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1799, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1783 Year

1783 (MDCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1783rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 783rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 83rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1783, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1779 Year

1779 (MDCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1779th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 779th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1779, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1795 Year

1795 (MDCCXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1795th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 795th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1795, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1780 Year

1780 (MDCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1780th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 780th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1780, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1778 Year

1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1778th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 778th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1778, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1777 Year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1775 Year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1776 in Great Britain.

1776 in the United States USA-related events during the year 1776

Events from the year 1776 in the United States. This year is celebrated in the United States as the official beginning of its nationhood, with the Declaration of Independence issued on July 4.

1777 in the United States USA-related events during the year of 1777

Events from the year 1777 in the United States.

References

  1. "Timeline of the American Revolutionary War". Independence Hall. Archived from the original on May 30, 2007. Retrieved June 1, 2007.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 330–331. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  3. "Askersunds historia" (in Swedish). Föreningen Gamla Askersund. Retrieved March 25, 2011.
  4. 1 2 Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  5. 1 2 Saunt, Claudio (2014). West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN   9780393240207.
  6. "Mariinsky Theatre: History of the Theatre". Mariinsky Theatre. Archived from the original on December 3, 2011. Retrieved December 4, 2011.
  7. Rice, Hank (June 2000), Footnotes in History: "The First Salute", Sons of the American Revolution
  8. Lewis Preston Summers, History of Southwest Virginia, 1746-1786, Washington County, 1777-1870 (1903, reprinted by The Overmountain Press, 1989) p254
  9. ""An Act for dividing the county of Fincastle into three distinct counties, and the parish of Botetourt into four distinct parishes"".
  10. Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States History from 458 A. D. to 1909, ed. by Benson John Lossing and, Woodrow Wilson (Harper & Brothers, 1910) p166

Further reading