1777

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1777 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1777
MDCCLXXVII
Ab urbe condita 2530
Armenian calendar 1226
ԹՎ ՌՄԻԶ
Assyrian calendar 6527
Balinese saka calendar 1698–1699
Bengali calendar 1184
Berber calendar 2727
British Regnal year 17  Geo. 3   18  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2321
Burmese calendar 1139
Byzantine calendar 7285–7286
Chinese calendar 丙申(Fire  Monkey)
4473 or 4413
     to 
丁酉年 (Fire  Rooster)
4474 or 4414
Coptic calendar 1493–1494
Discordian calendar 2943
Ethiopian calendar 1769–1770
Hebrew calendar 5537–5538
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1833–1834
 - Shaka Samvat 1698–1699
 - Kali Yuga 4877–4878
Holocene calendar 11777
Igbo calendar 777–778
Iranian calendar 1155–1156
Islamic calendar 1190–1191
Japanese calendar An'ei 6
(安永6年)
Javanese calendar 1702–1703
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4110
Minguo calendar 135 before ROC
民前135年
Nanakshahi calendar 309
Thai solar calendar 2319–2320
Tibetan calendar 阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1903 or 1522 or 750
     to 
阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1904 or 1523 or 751
January 2: General George Washington at Trenton General George Washington at Trenton by John Trumbull.jpeg
January 2: General George Washington at Trenton

1777 ( MDCCLXXVII ) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar , the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium , the 77th year of the 18th century , and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2009, 2015, and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 363 days remain until the end of the year.

Battle of the Assunpink Creek battle between American and British troops

The Battle of the Assunpink Creek, also known as the Second Battle of Trenton, was a battle between American and British troops that took place in and around Trenton, New Jersey, on January 2, 1777, during the American Revolutionary War, and resulted in an American victory.

January 3 is the third day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 362 days remain until the end of the year. Perihelion, the point during the year when the Earth is closest to the Sun, occurs around this date.

AprilJune

April 1 is the 91st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 274 days remain until the end of the year.

Friedrich Maximilian Klinger German dramatist and novelist

Friedrich Maximilian von Klinger was a German dramatist and novelist. His play Sturm und Drang (1776) gave its name to the Sturm und Drang artistic epoch. He was a childhood friend of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and is often closely associated with Jakob Michael Reinhold Lenz. Klinger worked as a playwright for the Seylersche Schauspiel-Gesellschaft for two years, but eventually left the Kingdom of Prussia to become a General in the Imperial Russian Army.

Sturm und Drang is a play in five acts by Friedrich Maximilian Klinger, which gave its name to the artistic period known as Sturm und Drang. The play's original title was Wirrwarr; it was changed to Sturm und Drang before premiering.

June 14: US Flag (had various star patterns) Flag of the United States (1777-1795).svg
June 14: US Flag (had various star patterns)

June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 200 days remain until the end of the year.

Flag of the United States National flag

The flag of the United States of America, often referred to as the American flag, is the national flag of the United States. It consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red alternating with white, with a blue rectangle in the canton bearing fifty small, white, five-pointed stars arranged in nine offset horizontal rows, where rows of six stars alternate with rows of five stars. The 50 stars on the flag represent the 50 states of the United States of America, and the 13 stripes represent the thirteen British colonies that declared independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and became the first states in the U.S. Nicknames for the flag include the Stars and Stripes, Old Glory, and the Star-Spangled Banner.

Continental Congress convention of delegates that became the governing body of the United States

The Continental Congress was initially a convention of delegates from several British American colonies at the height of the American Revolution era, who spoke and acted collectively for the people of the Thirteen colonies that ultimately became the United States of America. The term most specifically refers to the First Continental Congress of 1774 and the Second Continental Congress of 1775–81. More broadly, it also refers to the Congress of the Confederation of 1781–89, thus covering the entire period the Continental Congress served as the chief legislative and executive body of the U.S. government.

JulyDecember

July 8 is the 189th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 176 days remain until the end of the year.

Constitution of Vermont (1777) constitution for the Republic of Vermont

The first Constitution of Vermont was drafted in July 1777, almost five months after Vermont declared itself an independent country, now frequently called the Vermont Republic. It was in effect until its extensive revision in 1786. The second Constitution of Vermont went into effect in 1786 and lasted until 1793, two years after Vermont was admitted to the Union as the fourteenth state. In 1791 Vermont became the fourteenth US state and in 1793 it adopted its current constitution.

Vermont State of the United States of America

Vermont is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. It borders the U.S. states of Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. Vermont is the second-smallest by population and the sixth-smallest by area of the 50 U.S. states. The state capital is Montpelier, the least populous state capital in the United States. The most populous city, Burlington, is the least populous city to be the most populous city in a state. As of 2015, Vermont was the leading producer of maple syrup in the United States. In crime statistics, it was ranked since 2016 as the safest state in the country.

Date unknown

A code duello is a set of rules for a one-on-one combat, or duel.

Clonmel Town in Munster, Ireland

Clonmel is the county town and largest settlement of County Tipperary, Ireland. The town is noted in Irish history for its resistance to the Cromwellian army which sacked the towns of Drogheda and Wexford. With the exception of the townland of Suir Island, most of the borough is situated in the civil parish of "St Mary's" which is part of the ancient barony of Iffa and Offa East.

The courts of assize, or assizes, were periodic courts held around England and Wales until 1972, when together with the quarter sessions they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971 and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court. The assizes exercised both civil and criminal jurisdiction, though most of their work was on the criminal side. The assizes heard the most serious cases, which were committed to it by the quarter sessions, while the more minor offences were dealt with summarily by justices of the peace in petty sessions.

Births

JanuaryMarch

Roger B. Taney Roger B. Taney - Brady-Handy.jpg
Roger B. Taney

AprilJune

Carl Friedrich Gauss Carl Friedrich Gauss.jpg
Carl Friedrich Gauss

JulySeptember

Hans Christian Orsted Hans Christian Orsted daguerreotype.jpg
Hans Christian Ørsted

OctoberDecember

Heinrich von Kleist Kleist, Heinrich von.jpg
Heinrich von Kleist
Alexander I of Russia Alexander I of Russia by F.Kruger (1837, Hermitage).jpg
Alexander I of Russia

Date unknown

Deaths

Enrichetta d'Este died 30 January Henriqueta d'Este.jpg
Enrichetta d'Este died 30 January
Pierre-Herman Dosquet died 4 March Mgr Pierre-Herman Dosquet.jpg
Pierre-Herman Dosquet died 4 March
Cornelia Schlosser died 8 June Cornelia Schlosser geb Goethe.jpg
Cornelia Schlosser died 8 June
Consort Shu died 4 July The Qing Dynasty Consort Yehonara.JPG
Consort Shu died 4 July
Infante Philip, Duke of Calabria died 19 September Infante Felipe Antonio, "Duke of Calabria" Infante of Spain (Francesco Liani).jpg
Infante Philip, Duke of Calabria died 19 September
Charles Antoine de La Roche-Aymon died 27 October WP Charles-Antoine de la Roche-Aymon.jpg
Charles Antoine de La Roche-Aymon died 27 October
Sir Charles Knowles, 1st Baronet died 9 December Ad Sir Charles Knowles Bt.jpg
Sir Charles Knowles, 1st Baronet died 9 December

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Related Research Articles

1808 Year

1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1808th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 808th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1808, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1812 Year

1812 (MDCCCXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1812th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 812th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1812, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 Year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 12 days until February 28, 1900.

1803 Year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1781 Year

1781 (MDCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1781st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 781st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1781, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1799 Year

1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1799th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 799th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1799, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1779 Year

1779 (MDCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1779th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 779th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1779, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1795 Year

1795 (MDCCXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1795th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 795th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1795, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1780 Year

1780 (MDCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1780th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 780th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1780, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1778 Year

1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1778th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 778th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1778, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1775 Year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. Birth of Sir Dingo of Dundee May 17, 1775.Cancer also began there was the first case of cancer from Ella O Leary

1708 Year

1708 (MDCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1708th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 708th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1708, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a leap year starting on Wednesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

Fort Ticonderoga 18th-century star fort in northern New York in the United States

Fort Ticonderoga, formerly Fort Carillon, is a large 18th-century star fort built by the French at a narrows near the south end of Lake Champlain, in northern New York, in the United States. It was constructed by Canadian-born French military engineer Michel Chartier de Lotbinière, Marquis de Lotbinière between October 1755 and 1757, during the action in the "North American theater" of the Seven Years' War, often referred to in the US as the French and Indian War. The fort was of strategic importance during the 18th-century colonial conflicts between Great Britain and France, and again played an important role during the American Revolutionary War.

John Burgoyne British general and playwright, defeated in the 1777 Saratoga campaign

General John Burgoyne was a British army officer, dramatist and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1761 to 1792. He first saw action during the Seven Years' War when he participated in several battles, most notably during the Portugal Campaign of 1762.

James Inglis Hamilton General of the British Army

General James Inglis Hamilton was a Scottish soldier. He enlisted in the British Army in 1755 and commanded several regiments. He was the only colonel of the 113th Regiment of Foot. During the Seven Years' War (1756–1763), Hamilton fought in the Siege of Fort St Philip, the Raid on St Malo, and the Capture of Belle Île.

Friedrich Adolf Riedesel Hessian mercenary general

Friedrich Adolf Riedesel, Freiherr zu Eisenbach was a German officer who served in the Seven Years' War and American War of Independence. He was the commander of the Braunschweiger Jäger, a regiment of soldiers from the Principality of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel that was among the German units hired by the British during the American War of Independence. He then commanded all German soldiers in the Saratoga Campaign.

Convention Army

The Convention Army (1777–1783) was an army of British and allied troops captured after the Battles of Saratoga in the American Revolutionary War.

1776 Year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Northern theater of the American Revolutionary War after Saratoga

The Northern theater of the American Revolutionary War after Saratoga consisted of a series of battles between American revolutionaries and British forces, from 1778 to 1782 during the American Revolutionary War. It is characterized by two primary areas of activity. The first set of activities was based around the British base of operations in New York City, where each side made probes and counterprobes against the other's positions that sometimes resulted in notable actions. The second was essentially a frontier war in Upstate New York and rural northern Pennsylvania that was largely fought by state militia companies and some Indian allies on the American side, and Loyalist companies supported by Indians, British Indian agents, and occasionally British regulars. The notable exception to significant Continental Army participation on the frontier was the 1779 Sullivan Expedition, in which General John Sullivan led an army expedition that drove the Iroquois out of New York. The warfare amongst the splinters of the Iroquois Six Nations were particularly brutal, turning much of the Indian population into refugees.

1777 in the United States USA-related events during the year of 1777

Events from the year 1777 in the United States.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Lossing, Benson John; Wilson, Woodrow, eds. (1910). Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States History from 458 A.D. to 1909. Harper & Brothers. p. 166.
  2. Vyas, Amee. "Georgia's County Governments." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 31 October 2018. Web. 05 February 2019.https://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/counties-cities-neighborhoods/georgias-county-governments
  3. King, Joseph (1899). Christianity in Polynesia: A Study and a Defence. William Brooks and Co. p. 71.
  4. Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 331. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.

Further reading