1777

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1777 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1777
MDCCLXXVII
Ab urbe condita 2530
Armenian calendar 1226
ԹՎ ՌՄԻԶ
Assyrian calendar 6527
Balinese saka calendar 1698–1699
Bengali calendar 1184
Berber calendar 2727
British Regnal year 17  Geo. 3   18  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2321
Burmese calendar 1139
Byzantine calendar 7285–7286
Chinese calendar 丙申年 (Fire  Monkey)
4474 or 4267
     to 
丁酉年 (Fire  Rooster)
4475 or 4268
Coptic calendar 1493–1494
Discordian calendar 2943
Ethiopian calendar 1769–1770
Hebrew calendar 5537–5538
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1833–1834
 - Shaka Samvat 1698–1699
 - Kali Yuga 4877–4878
Holocene calendar 11777
Igbo calendar 777–778
Iranian calendar 1155–1156
Islamic calendar 1190–1191
Japanese calendar An'ei 6
(安永6年)
Javanese calendar 1702–1703
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4110
Minguo calendar 135 before ROC
民前135年
Nanakshahi calendar 309
Thai solar calendar 2319–2320
Tibetan calendar 阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1903 or 1522 or 750
     to 
阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1904 or 1523 or 751
January 2: General George Washington at Trenton General George Washington at Trenton by John Trumbull.jpeg
January 2: General George Washington at Trenton
October 17: Battles of Saratoga Surrender of General Burgoyne.jpg
October 17: Battles of Saratoga

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

June 14: US Flag (had various star patterns) Flag of the United States (1777-1795).svg
June 14: US Flag (had various star patterns)

JulyDecember

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryMarch

Roger B. Taney Roger B. Taney - Brady-Handy.jpg
Roger B. Taney

AprilJune

Carl Friedrich Gauss Carl Friedrich Gauss.jpg
Carl Friedrich Gauss

JulySeptember

Paavo Ruotsalainen Paavo Ruotsalainen.jpg
Paavo Ruotsalainen
Hans Christian Orsted Hans Christian Orsted daguerreotype.jpg
Hans Christian Ørsted

OctoberDecember

Heinrich von Kleist Kleist, Heinrich von.jpg
Heinrich von Kleist
Alexander I of Russia Alexander I of Russia by G.Dawe (1826, Peterhof).jpg
Alexander I of Russia

Date unknown

Deaths

Enrichetta d'Este Henriqueta d'Este.jpg
Enrichetta d'Este
Pierre-Herman Dosquet Mgr Pierre-Herman Dosquet.jpg
Pierre-Herman Dosquet
Cornelia Schlosser Cornelia Schlosser geb Goethe.jpg
Cornelia Schlosser
Consort Shu The Qing Dynasty Consort Yehonara.JPG
Consort Shu
Infante Philip, Duke of Calabria Infante Felipe Antonio, "Duke of Calabria" Infante of Spain (Francesco Liani).jpg
Infante Philip, Duke of Calabria
Charles Antoine de La Roche-Aymon WP Charles-Antoine de la Roche-Aymon.jpg
Charles Antoine de La Roche-Aymon
Sir Charles Knowles, 1st Baronet Ad Sir Charles Knowles Bt.jpg
Sir Charles Knowles, 1st Baronet

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1780s</span> Decade

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1800</span> Calendar year

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1795</span> Calendar year

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1778</span> Calendar year

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1775</span> Calendar year

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Siege of Fort Ticonderoga (1777)</span> 1777 battle of the American Revolutionary War

The 1777 Siege of Fort Ticonderoga occurred between the 2nd and 6 July 1777 at Fort Ticonderoga, near the southern end of Lake Champlain in the state of New York. Lieutenant General John Burgoyne's 8,000-man army occupied high ground above the fort, and nearly surrounded the defenses. These movements precipitated the occupying Continental Army, an under-strength force of 3,000 under the command of General Arthur St. Clair, to withdraw from Ticonderoga and the surrounding defenses. Some gunfire was exchanged, and there were some casualties, but there was no formal siege and no pitched battle. Burgoyne's army occupied Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence, the extensive fortifications on the Vermont side of the lake, without opposition on 6 July. Advance units pursued the retreating Americans.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1776</span> Calendar year

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The northern theater of the American Revolutionary War also known as the Northern Department of the Continental Army was a theater of operations during the American Revolutionary War.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Germans in the American Revolution</span> Overview of the role of ethnic Germans during the American Revolutionary War

Ethnic Germans served on both sides of the American Revolutionary War. Large numbers of Germans had emigrated to Pennsylvania, New York, and other American colonies, and they were generally neutral. Some belonged to pacifist sects such as the Amish, but many were drawn into the Revolution and the war.

Events from the year 1777 in the United States.

<i>Surrender of General Burgoyne</i> 1821 painting by John Trumbull

The Surrender of General Burgoyne is an oil painting by the American artist John Trumbull. The painting was completed in 1821 and hangs in the United States Capitol rotunda in Washington, D.C.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Lossing, Benson John; Wilson, Woodrow, eds. (1910). Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States History from 458 A.D. to 1909. Harper & Brothers. p. 166.
  2. Vyas, Amee. "Georgia's County Governments." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 31 October 2018. Web. 05 February 2019.https://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/counties-cities-neighborhoods/georgias-county-governments
  3. King, Joseph (1899). Christianity in Polynesia: A Study and a Defence. William Brooks and Co. p.  71.
  4. Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History . London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p.  331. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  5. Harris, Michael (2014). Brandywine: A Military History of the Battle that Lost Philadelphia but Saved America, September 11, 1777. El Dorado Hills, CA: Savas Beatiuùuù hie. p. 55. ISBN   978-1-61121-162-7.
  6. Ketchum, Richard M (1997). Saratoga: Turning Point of America's Revolutionary War. New York: Henry Holt. pp. 52–55. ISBN   978-0-8050-6123-9. OCLC   41397623. (Paperback ISBN   0-8050-6123-1)
  7. Paavo Ruotsalainen – Aholansaari (in Finnish)
  8. "Maximilian III Joseph | elector of Bavaria | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved March 16, 2022.

Further reading