1778

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1778 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1778
MDCCLXXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2531
Armenian calendar 1227
ԹՎ ՌՄԻԷ
Assyrian calendar 6528
Balinese saka calendar 1699–1700
Bengali calendar 1185
Berber calendar 2728
British Regnal year 18  Geo. 3   19  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2322
Burmese calendar 1140
Byzantine calendar 7286–7287
Chinese calendar 丁酉(Fire  Rooster)
4474 or 4414
     to 
戊戌年 (Earth  Dog)
4475 or 4415
Coptic calendar 1494–1495
Discordian calendar 2944
Ethiopian calendar 1770–1771
Hebrew calendar 5538–5539
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1834–1835
 - Shaka Samvat 1699–1700
 - Kali Yuga 4878–4879
Holocene calendar 11778
Igbo calendar 778–779
Iranian calendar 1156–1157
Islamic calendar 1191–1192
Japanese calendar An'ei 7
(安永7年)
Javanese calendar 1703–1704
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4111
Minguo calendar 134 before ROC
民前134年
Nanakshahi calendar 310
Thai solar calendar 2320–2321
Tibetan calendar 阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1904 or 1523 or 751
     to 
阳土狗年
(male Earth-Dog)
1905 or 1524 or 752
June 28: Battle of Monmouth BattleofMonmouth.jpg
June 28: Battle of Monmouth

1778 ( MDCCLXXVIII ) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar , the 1778th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 778th year of the 2nd millennium , the 78th year of the 18th century , and the 9th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1778, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 347 days remaining until the end of the year.

Third voyage of James Cook

James Cook's third and final voyage took the route from Plymouth via Cape Town and Tenerife to New Zealand and the Hawaiian Islands, and along the North American coast to the Bering Strait.

Sea captain Commander of a ship or other sea-going vessel

A sea captain, ship's captain, captain, master, or shipmaster, is a high-grade licensed mariner who holds ultimate command and responsibility of a merchant vessel. The captain is responsible for the safe and efficient operation of the ship and its people and cargo, including its seaworthiness, safety and security, cargo operations, navigation, crew management, and legal compliance.

AprilJune

April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 268 days remaining until the end of the year.

William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham 18th-century British statesman

William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, was a British statesman of the Whig group who led the government of Great Britain twice in the middle of the 18th century. Historians call him Pitt of Chatham, or William Pitt the Elder, to distinguish him from his son, William Pitt the Younger, who also was a prime minister. Pitt was also known as The Great Commoner, because of his long-standing refusal to accept a title until 1766.

April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 263 days remaining until the end of the year.

JulySeptember

July 3 is the 184th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 181 days remaining until the end of the year.

American Revolutionary War 1775–1783 war between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, which won independence as the United States of America

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was an 18th-century war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America.

Battle of Wyoming

The Battle of Wyoming was an encounter during the American Revolutionary War between American Patriots and Loyalists accompanied by Iroquois raiders that took place in the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania on July 3, 1778. More than three hundred Patriots were killed in the battle.

OctoberDecember

October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 80 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 26: Captain Cook lands on Maui. KahakuloaHead sml.jpg
November 26: Captain Cook lands on Maui.

Undated

Births

January–April

Thomas Lincoln Thomas Herring Lincoln.jpg
Thomas Lincoln
Margaret Bayard Smith Portrait of Margaret Bayard Smith, by Charles Bird King.jpg
Margaret Bayard Smith
José de San Martín Retrato más canónico de José de San Martín.jpg
José de San Martín
William Hazlitt William Hazlitt self-portrait (1802).jpg
William Hazlitt

May–August

Harry Croswell Rev. Harry Croswell circa 1835.jpg
Harry Croswell
Friedrich Ludwig Jahn Friedrich Ludwig Jahn.jpg
Friedrich Ludwig Jahn
Bernardo O'Higgins Ohiggins.jpg
Bernardo O'Higgins

September–December

Clemens Brentano Brentano2.jpg
Clemens Brentano
Giovanni Battista Belzoni Belzoni1.jpg
Giovanni Battista Belzoni
Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac Gaylussac.jpg
Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac
Humphry Davy Sir Humphry Davy, Bt by Thomas Phillips.jpg
Humphry Davy
Joseph Grimaldi Grimaldi by John Cawse.jpg
Joseph Grimaldi

Undated

Deaths

Carl Linnaeus Carl von Linné.jpg
Carl Linnaeus
Voltaire Nicolas de Largillière, François-Marie Arouet dit Voltaire (vers 1724-1725) -001.jpg
Voltaire
Jean-Jacques Rousseau Jean-Jacques Rousseau (painted portrait).jpg
Jean-Jacques Rousseau

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1911 Year

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1789 Year

1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1789th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 789th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1789, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1797 Year

1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1797th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 797th year of the 2nd millennium, the 97th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1797, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1796 Year

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1752 Year

1752 (MDCCLII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1752nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 752nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1752, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the British Empire, it was the only year with 355 days, as 3–13 September were skipped when the Empire adopted the Gregorian calendar.

1792 Year

1792 (MDCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1792nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 792nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1792, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1758 Year

1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1758th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 758th year of the 2nd millennium, the 58th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1758, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1799 Year

1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1799th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 799th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1799, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1779 Year

1779 (MDCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1779th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 779th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1779, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1777 Year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day later Julian calendar.

1773 Year

1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1773rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 773rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 73rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1773, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1712 Year

1712 (MDCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1712th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 712th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1712, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it began as a leap year starting on Monday and remained so until Thursday, February 29. By adding a second leap day Sweden reverted to the Julian calendar and the rest of the year was in sync with the Julian calendar. Sweden finally made the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1753. This year has 367 days.

1701 Year

1701 (MDCCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1701st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 701st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1701, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Tuesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1776 Year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1776 in Great Britain.

This article is about the particular significance of the decade 1850–1859 to Wales and its people.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States History from 458 A. D. to 1909, ed. by Benson John Lossing and, Woodrow Wilson (Harper & Brothers, 1910) p166
  2. "Pitt, William (The Elder; Ear of Chatham)", by Philip Woodfine, in British Political Leaders: A Biographical Dictionary, ed. by Keith Laybourn (ABC-CLIO, 2001) p264
  3. Barry Alan Shain, The Declaration of Independence in Historical Context (Yale University Press, 2014) p657
  4. Raymond C. Houghton, A Revolutionary War Road Trip on US Route 9 (Cyber Haus, 2003) pp37-38
  5. "Benedict Arnold".
  6. "The Present State of the West-Indies: Containing an Accurate Description of What Parts Are Possessed by the Several Powers in Europe". World Digital Library . 1778. Retrieved 2013-08-30.

Further reading