1780

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1780 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1780
MDCCLXXX
Ab urbe condita 2533
Armenian calendar 1229
ԹՎ ՌՄԻԹ
Assyrian calendar 6530
Balinese saka calendar 1701–1702
Bengali calendar 1187
Berber calendar 2730
British Regnal year 20  Geo. 3   21  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2324
Burmese calendar 1142
Byzantine calendar 7288–7289
Chinese calendar 己亥年 (Earth  Pig)
4477 or 4270
     to 
庚子年 (Metal  Rat)
4478 or 4271
Coptic calendar 1496–1497
Discordian calendar 2946
Ethiopian calendar 1772–1773
Hebrew calendar 5540–5541
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1836–1837
 - Shaka Samvat 1701–1702
 - Kali Yuga 4880–4881
Holocene calendar 11780
Igbo calendar 780–781
Iranian calendar 1158–1159
Islamic calendar 1193–1195
Japanese calendar An'ei 9
(安永9年)
Javanese calendar 1705–1706
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4113
Minguo calendar 132 before ROC
民前132年
Nanakshahi calendar 312
Thai solar calendar 2322–2323
Tibetan calendar 阴土猪年
(female Earth-Pig)
1906 or 1525 or 753
     to 
阳金鼠年
(male Iron-Rat)
1907 or 1526 or 754
May 29: Waxhaw Massacre in America. Waxhaw massacre sketch.jpg
May 29: Waxhaw Massacre in America.

1780 (MDCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1780th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 780th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1780, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

Carl von Clausewitz Carl von Clausewitz.PNG
Carl von Clausewitz

Date unknown

Deaths

Thomas Hutchinson ThomasHutchinsonByEdwardTruman.jpg
Thomas Hutchinson
William Blackstone Sir William Blackstone from NPG.jpg
William Blackstone
Empress Maria Theresa of Austria Kaiserin Maria Theresia (HRR).jpg
Empress Maria Theresa of Austria

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">18th century</span> One hundred years, from 1701 to 1800

The 18th century lasted from 1 January 1701 to 31 December 1800 (MDCCC). During the 18th century, elements of Enlightenment thinking culminated in the Atlantic Revolutions. During the century, slave trading and human trafficking expanded across the shores of the Atlantic, while declining in Russia, China, and Korea. Revolutions began to challenge the legitimacy of monarchical and aristocratic power structures, including the structures and beliefs that supported slavery. The Industrial Revolution began during mid-century, leading to radical changes in human society and the environment. The European colonization of the Americas and other parts of the world intensified and associated mass migrations of people grew in size as part of the Age of Sail.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1787</span> Calendar year

1787 (MDCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1787th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 787th year of the 2nd millennium, the 87th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1787, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1770s</span> Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1770s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1770, and ended on December 31, 1779. A period full of discoveries, breakthroughs happened in all walks of life, as what emerged at this period brought life to most innovations we know today.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1780s</span> Decade

The 1780s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1780, and ended on December 31, 1789. A period widely considered as transitional between the Age of Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution, the 1780s saw the inception of modern philosophy. With the rise of astronomical, technological, and political discoveries and innovations such as Uranus, cast iron on structures, republicanism and hot-air balloons, the 1780s kick-started a rapid global industrialization movement, leaving behind the world's predominantly agrarian customs in the past.

1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1789th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 789th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1789, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1644</span> Calendar year

1644 (MDCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1644th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 644th year of the 2nd millennium, the 44th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1644, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1794</span> Calendar year

1794 (MDCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1794th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 794th year of the 2nd millennium, the 94th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1794, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1793</span> Calendar year

1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1793rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 793rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1793, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1781</span> Calendar year

1781 (MDCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1781st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 781st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1781, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1779</span> Calendar year

1779 (MDCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1779th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 779th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1779, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1795</span> Calendar year

1795 (MDCCXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1795th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 795th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1795, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1786</span> Calendar year

1786 (MDCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1786th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 786th year of the 2nd millennium, the 86th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1786, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1785</span> Calendar year

1785 (MDCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1785th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 785th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1785, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1784</span> Calendar year

1784 (MDCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1784th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 784th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1784, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1777</span> Calendar year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1775</span> Calendar year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1769</span> Calendar year

1769 (MDCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1769th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 769th year of the 2nd millennium, the 69th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1769, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1761</span> Calendar year

1761 (MDCCLXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1761st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 761st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1761, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1776</span> Calendar year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1780 in Great Britain.

References

  1. Lossing, Benson John; Wilson, Woodrow, eds. (1910). Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States History from 458 A.D. to 1909. New York: Harper & Brothers. p. 166.
  2. 1 2 Ferguson, Russell J. (1938). Early Western Pennsylvania Politics. p. 34.
  3. Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History . London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp.  333. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  4. 1 2 Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  5. Facts for the Times: Containing Historical Extracts, Candid Admissions, and Important Testimony from Eminent Authors, Ancient and Modern on the Leading Topics of the Scriptures and Signs of the Times. Review and Herald Publishing. 1893. p. 66.
  6. Juster, Susan (2010). Doomsayers: Anglo-American Prophecy in the Age of Revolution. University of Pennsylvania Press. p. 223.
  7. "Timeline of the American Revolutionary War". Independence Hall. Archived from the original on May 30, 2007. Retrieved June 1, 2007.
  8. Hattendorf, John (2000). Naval policy and strategy in the Mediterranean: past, present, and future. Taylor & Francis. p. 37. ISBN   0-7146-8054-0.
  9. Harbron, John (1988). Trafalgar and the Spanish Navy. Conway Maritime Press. p. 84. ISBN   0-85177-477-6.
  10. Walford, Cornelius, ed. (1876). "Fires, Great". The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance. C. and E. Layton. p. 59.
  11. Edler, Friedrich (2001) [1911]. The Dutch Republic and The American Revolution. Honolulu: University Press of the Pacific. pp. 163–166. ISBN   0-89875-269-8.
  12. Lala, Tașcu (February 2, 2022). "Mihail G. Boiagi (03.02.1780 - 1828)" (in Aromanian). Radio Romania International. Archived from the original on March 29, 2024.
  13. "Shere-e-Punjab Maharaja Ranjit Singh (1780-1839 AD) (A brief account)". Chandigarh: Institute of Sikh Studies. Retrieved October 10, 2012.
  14. "Sir James Steuart Denham, 4th Baronet | Scottish economist | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved May 31, 2022.
  15. "Maria Theresa | Biography, Facts, Accomplishments, & Children | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved May 4, 2022.

Further reading