1783

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1783 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1783
MDCCLXXXIII
Ab urbe condita 2536
Armenian calendar 1232
ԹՎ ՌՄԼԲ
Assyrian calendar 6533
Balinese saka calendar 1704–1705
Bengali calendar 1190
Berber calendar 2733
British Regnal year 23  Geo. 3   24  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2327
Burmese calendar 1145
Byzantine calendar 7291–7292
Chinese calendar 壬寅(Water  Tiger)
4479 or 4419
     to 
癸卯年 (Water  Rabbit)
4480 or 4420
Coptic calendar 1499–1500
Discordian calendar 2949
Ethiopian calendar 1775–1776
Hebrew calendar 5543–5544
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1839–1840
 - Shaka Samvat 1704–1705
 - Kali Yuga 4883–4884
Holocene calendar 11783
Igbo calendar 783–784
Iranian calendar 1161–1162
Islamic calendar 1197–1198
Japanese calendar Tenmei 3
(天明3年)
Javanese calendar 1708–1710
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4116
Minguo calendar 129 before ROC
民前129年
Nanakshahi calendar 315
Thai solar calendar 2325–2326
Tibetan calendar 阳水虎年
(male Water-Tiger)
1909 or 1528 or 756
     to 
阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
1910 or 1529 or 757
The first manned hot-air balloon, designed by the Montgolfier brothers, takes off from the Bois de Boulogne, on November 21, 1783 Montgolfier brothers flight.jpg
The first manned hot-air balloon, designed by the Montgolfier brothers, takes off from the Bois de Boulogne, on November 21, 1783

1783 (MDCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1783rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 783rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 83rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1783, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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OctoberDecember

December 23: General George Washington Resigning His Commission General George Washington Resigning his Commission.jpg
December 23: General George Washington Resigning His Commission

Date unknown

Births

Washington Irving Portrait of Washington Irving attr. to Charles Robert Leslie.jpg
Washington Irving
John Crawfurd John Crawfurd.jpg
John Crawfurd
Simon Bolivar Bolivar Arturo Michelena.jpg
Simón Bolívar

Deaths

Capability Brown Lancelot ('Capability') Brown by Nathaniel Dance, (later Sir Nathaniel Dance-Holland, Bt) cropped.jpg
Capability Brown
Leonhard Euler Leonhard Euler.jpg
Leonhard Euler

Related Research Articles

Articles of Confederation First constitution of the United States

The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. It was approved, after much debate, by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, and sent to the states for ratification. The Articles of Confederation came into force on March 1, 1781, after being ratified by all 13 states. A guiding principle of the Articles was to preserve the independence and sovereignty of the states. The weak central government established by the Articles received only those powers which the former colonies had recognized as belonging to king and parliament.

1780s decade

The 1780s decade ran from January 1, 1780, to December 31, 1789.

1782 1782

1782 (MDCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1782nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 782nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 82nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1782, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1785 1785

1785 (MDCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1785th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 785th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1785, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1784 1784

1784 (MDCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1784th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 784th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1784, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Continental Congress convention of delegates that became the governing body of the United States

The Continental Congress was initially a convention of delegates from a number of British American colonies at the height of the American Revolution, who acted collectively for the people of the Thirteen Colonies that ultimately became the United States of America. After declaring the colonies independent from the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1776, it acted as the provisional governing structure for the collective United States, while most government functions remained in the individual states. The term most specifically refers to the First Continental Congress of 1774 and the Second Continental Congress of 1775–1781. More broadly, it also refers to the Congress of the Confederation of 1781–1789, thus covering the three congressional bodies of the Thirteen Colonies and the United States that met between 1774 and the inauguration of a new government in 1789 under the United States Constitution.

Treaty of Alliance (1778) 1778 defense pact between France and the United States

The Treaty of Alliance with France or Franco-American Treaty was a defensive alliance between France and the United States of America, formed in the midst of the American Revolutionary War, which promised mutual military support in case fighting should break out between French and British forces, as the result of signing the previously concluded Treaty of Amity and Commerce. The alliance was planned to endure indefinitely into the future. Delegates of King Louis XVI of France and the Second Continental Congress, who represented the United States at this time, signed the two treaties along with a separate and secret clause dealing with future Spanish involvement, at the hôtel de Coislin in Paris on February 6, 1778. The Franco-American alliance would technically remain in effect until the 1800 Treaty of Mortefontaine, despite being annulled by the United States Congress in 1793 when George Washington gave his Neutrality Proclamation speech saying that America would stay neutral in the French Revolution.

History of the United States (1776–1789) aspect of history

Between 1776 and 1789 thirteen British colonies emerged as a new independent nation that would be eventually known as The United States of America. The Second Continental Congress issued the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, formally launching the American Revolutionary War, the fighting of which had already started between colonial militias and the British Army in 1775. Under the leadership of General George Washington, the Continental Army and Navy defeated the British military securing the independence of the thirteen colonies. In 1789, Federalists replaced the Articles of Confederation, passed in 1777 as the original governing agreement between the newly independent states, with the Constitution of the United States of America, which with amendments remains the fundamental governing law of the United States today.

Timeline of the American Revolution — timeline of the political upheaval culminating in the 18th century in which Thirteen Colonies in North America joined together for independence from the British Empire, and after victory in the Revolutionary War combined to form the United States of America. The American Revolution includes political, social, and military aspects. The revolutionary era is generally considered to have begun with the passage of the Stamp Act in 1765 and ended with the ratification of the United States Bill of Rights in 1791. The military phase of the revolution, the American Revolutionary War, lasted from 1775 to 1783.

France in the American Revolutionary War Involvement of France in the American Revolution

French involvement in the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, when France, a rival of the British Empire, secretly shipped supplies to the Continental Army. A Treaty of Alliance followed in 1778, which led to shipments of money and matériel to the United States. Subsequently, the Spanish Empire and the Dutch Republic also began to send assistance, leaving the British Empire with no allies. Spain openly declared war but the Dutch did not.

Congress of the Confederation governing body of the United States of America that existed from March 1, 1781, to March 4, 1789

The Congress of the Confederation, or the Confederation Congress, formally referred to as the United States in Congress Assembled, was the governing body of the United States of America that existed from March 1, 1781, to March 4, 1789. A unicameral body with legislative and executive function, it was composed of delegates appointed by the legislatures of the several states. Each state delegation had one vote. It was preceded by the Second Continental Congress (1775–1781) and was created by the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union in 1781. The Congress continued to refer itself as the Continental Congress throughout its eight-year history, although modern historians separate it from the two earlier congresses, which operated under slightly different rules and procedures until the later part of American Revolutionary War. The membership of the Second Continental Congress automatically carried over to the Congress of the Confederation when the latter was created by the ratification of the Articles of Confederation. It had the same secretary as the Second Continental Congress, namely Charles Thomson. The Congress of the Confederation was succeeded by the Congress of the United States as provided for in the new Constitution of the United States, proposed September 17, 1787, in Philadelphia and adopted by the United States in 1788.

New Hampshire Line

The New Hampshire Line was a formation within the Continental Army. The term "New Hampshire Line" referred to the quota of numbered infantry regiments assigned to New Hampshire at various times by the Continental Congress. These, together with similar contingents from the other twelve states, formed the Continental Line. The concept was particularly important in relation to the promotion of commissioned officers. Officers of the Continental Army below the rank of brigadier general were ordinarily ineligible for promotion except in the line of their own state.

The Confederation Period was the era of United States history in the 1780s after the American Revolution and prior to the ratification of the United States Constitution. In 1781, the United States ratified the Articles of Confederation and prevailed in the Battle of Yorktown, the last major land battle between British and American forces in the American Revolutionary War. American independence was confirmed with the 1783 signing of the Treaty of Paris. The fledgling United States faced several challenges, many of which stemmed from the lack of a strong national government and unified political culture. The period ended in 1789 following the ratification of the United States Constitution, which established a new, more powerful, national government.

Diplomacy in the Revolutionary War had an important impact on the Revolution, as the United States evolved an independent foreign policy.

Franco-American alliance French alliance with America

The Franco-American alliance was the 1778 alliance between the Kingdom of France and the United States during the American Revolutionary War. Formalized in the 1778 Treaty of Alliance, it was a military pact in which the French provided many supplies for the Americans. The Netherlands and Spain later joined as allies of France; Britain had no European allies. The French alliance was possible once the Americans captured a British invasion army at Saratoga in October 1777, demonstrating the viability of the American cause. The alliance became controversial after 1793 when Britain and Revolutionary France again went to war and the U.S. declared itself neutral. Relations between France and the United States worsened as the latter became closer to Britain in the Jay Treaty of 1795, leading to an undeclared Quasi War. The alliance was defunct by 1794 and formally ended in 1800.

Events from the year 1778 in the United States.

Events from the year 1782 in the United States.

Events from the year 1783 in the United States.

Events from the year 1784 in the United States.

The Treaty of Amity and Commerce Between the United States and Sweden, officially A treaty of Amity and Commerce concluded between His Majesty the King of Sweden and the United States of North America, was a treaty signed on April 3, 1783 in Paris, France between the United States and the Kingdom of Sweden. The treaty established a commercial alliance between these two nations and was signed during the American Revolutionary War.

References

  1. Cobbett, William, ed. (1814). The Parliamentary History of England: From the Earliest Period to Year 1803, Vol. XXIII: The Parliamentary Debates, 10 May 1782 to 1 December 1783. London: T. C. Hansard. pp. 346–354.
  2. Laws of the United States of America; from the 4th of March, 1789, to the 4th of March, 1815, Vol. 1. Weightman. 1815. p. 708.
  3. Klerkäng, Anne (1958). Sweden – America's First Friend. Örebro. Includes fascimile reproduction of treaty text.
  4. 1 2 3 Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States History from 458 A. D. to 1909, ed. by Benson John Lossing and Woodrow Wilson (Harper & Brothers, 1910) p167
  5. Bressan, David. "8, June 1783: The Laki eruptions" . Retrieved April 30, 2012.
  6. "Palau". Archived from the original on December 26, 2007. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  7. Fleming, Thomas. "The Most Important Moment in American History". History News Network. Retrieved May 17, 2016.
  8. Brookhiser, Richard (1996). Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington . Newark, NJ: Free Press. p.  103. ISBN   9780684822914.
  9. "Washington Irving – American author". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved January 3, 2017.
  10. "Samuel Prout (1783–1852)". artuk.org. Retrieved January 3, 2017.

Further reading