1796

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1796 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1796
MDCCXCVI
French Republican calendar 4–5
Ab urbe condita 2549
Armenian calendar 1245
ԹՎ ՌՄԽԵ
Assyrian calendar 6546
Balinese saka calendar 1717–1718
Bengali calendar 1203
Berber calendar 2746
British Regnal year 36  Geo. 3   37  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2340
Burmese calendar 1158
Byzantine calendar 7304–7305
Chinese calendar 乙卯年 (Wood  Rabbit)
4492 or 4432
     to 
丙辰年 (Fire  Dragon)
4493 or 4433
Coptic calendar 1512–1513
Discordian calendar 2962
Ethiopian calendar 1788–1789
Hebrew calendar 5556–5557
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1852–1853
 - Shaka Samvat 1717–1718
 - Kali Yuga 4896–4897
Holocene calendar 11796
Igbo calendar 796–797
Iranian calendar 1174–1175
Islamic calendar 1210–1211
Japanese calendar Kansei 8
(寛政8年)
Javanese calendar 1722–1723
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4129
Minguo calendar 116 before ROC
民前116年
Nanakshahi calendar 328
Thai solar calendar 2338–2339
Tibetan calendar 阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
1922 or 1541 or 769
     to 
阳火龙年
(male Fire-Dragon)
1923 or 1542 or 770
May 10: Battle of Lodi, (Musee de la Revolution francaise). Bataille du pont de Lodi, Musee de la Revolution francaise.jpg
May 10: Battle of Lodi, (Musée de la Révolution française).

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

November 17: Battle of Arcole La Bataille du Pont d'Arcole.jpg
November 17: Battle of Arcole

Date unknown

Births

Princess Charlotte of Wales Charlotte Augusta of Wales.jpg
Princess Charlotte of Wales
Philipp Franz von Siebold Bundespost Philipp Franz von Siebold.jpg
Philipp Franz von Siebold
Nicholas I of Russia Franz Kruger - Portrait of Emperor Nicholas I - WGA12289.jpg
Nicholas I of Russia
Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot c1850.png
Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryMarch

Samuel Huntington Samuel Huntington - Charles Willson Peale.jpg
Samuel Huntington
William Chambers (architect) Sir William Chambers.jpg
William Chambers (architect)

AprilJune

Ulrika Pasch Ulrica pasch.jpg
Ulrika Pasch
George Campbell Portrait of George Campbell.jpg
George Campbell
David Rittenhouse Charles Willson Peale - David Rittenhouse - Google Art Project.jpg
David Rittenhouse
Abraham Yates Jr. Abraham Yates.jpg
Abraham Yates Jr.

JulySeptember

Robert Burns PG 1063Burns Naysmithcrop.jpg
Robert Burns

OctoberDecember

Thomas Reid ThomasReid.jpg
Thomas Reid
Archibald Montgomerie, 11th Earl of Eglinton 11thEarlOfEglinton.jpg
Archibald Montgomerie, 11th Earl of Eglinton

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1809</span> Calendar year

1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1809th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 809th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1809, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1790s</span> Decade

The 1790s was a decade that began on January 1, 1790, and ended on December 31, 1799. Considered as some of the Industrial Revolution's earlier days, the 1790s called for the start of an anti-imperialist world, as new democracies such as the French First Republic and the United States began flourishing at this era. Revolutions – both political and social – forever transformed global politics and art, as wars such as the French Revolutionary Wars and the American Revolutionary War moulded modern-day concepts of liberalism, partisanship, elections, and the political compass.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1814</span> Calendar year

1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1814th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 814th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1814, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1800</span> Calendar year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1806</span> Calendar year

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1803</span> Calendar year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1805</span> Calendar year

1805 (MDCCCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1805th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 805th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1805, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1799</span> Calendar year

1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1799th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 799th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1799, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1795</span> Calendar year

1795 (MDCCXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1795th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 795th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1795, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1777</span> Calendar year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1775</span> Calendar year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">War of the First Coalition</span> 1792–1797 set of battles between the French revolutionaries and the neighbouring monarchies

The War of the First Coalition was a set of wars that several European powers fought between 1792 and 1797 initially against the constitutional Kingdom of France and then the French Republic that succeeded it. They were only loosely allied and fought without much apparent coordination or agreement; each power had its eye on a different part of France it wanted to appropriate after a French defeat, which never occurred.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">French Revolutionary Wars</span> 1792–1802 series of conflicts between the French Republic and several European monarchies

The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of sweeping military conflicts lasting from 1792 until 1802 and resulting from the French Revolution. They pitted France against Britain, Austria, Prussia, Russia, and several other monarchies. They are divided in two periods: the War of the First Coalition (1792–97) and the War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802). Initially confined to Europe, the fighting gradually assumed a global dimension. After a decade of constant warfare and aggressive diplomacy, France had conquered territories in the Italian Peninsula, the Low Countries and the Rhineland in Europe and abandoned Louisiana in North America. French success in these conflicts ensured the spread of revolutionary principles over much of Europe.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles-Pierre Augereau</span> French Marshal

Charles Pierre François Augereau, 1st Duke of Castiglione was a French military commander and a Marshal of the Empire who served during the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars. After serving in the Revolutionary Wars, he earned rapid promotion while fighting against Spain and soon found himself as a division commander under Napoleon Bonaparte in Italy. He fought in all of Bonaparte's battles of 1796 with great distinction. During the Napoleonic Wars, Napoleon entrusted Augereau with important commands. His life ended under a cloud because of his poor timing in switching sides between Napoleon and King Louis XVIII of France. Napoleon wrote of Augereau that he "has plenty of character, courage, firmness, activity; is inured to war; is well liked by the soldiery; is fortunate in his operations.". Augereau is generally counted as one of the most capable generals of the Napoleonic Wars.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Roman Republic (18th century)</span> Republic on the Apennine Peninsula between 1798–1799

The Roman Republic was a sister republic of the First French Republic. It was proclaimed on 15 February 1798 after Louis-Alexandre Berthier, a general of Napoleon, had occupied the city of Rome on 10 February. It was led by a Directory of five men and comprised territory conquered from the Papal States. Pope Pius VI was exiled to France and died there in August 1799. The republic immediately took control of the other two former-papal revolutionary administrations, the Tiberina Republic and the Anconine Republic. The Roman Republic proved short-lived, as Neapolitan troops restored the Papal States in October 1799.

The French Revolutionary Wars continued from 1795, with the French in an increasingly strong position as members of the First Coalition made separate peaces. Austria and Great Britain were the main remaining members of the coalition. The rebellion in the Vendée was also finally terminated by General Hoche.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Italian campaigns of the French Revolutionary Wars</span> 18th/19th century Italian campaign by French

The Italian campaigns of the French Revolutionary Wars (1792–1802) were a series of conflicts fought principally in Northern Italy between the French Revolutionary Army and a Coalition of Austria, Russia, Piedmont-Sardinia, and a number of other Italian states.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dagobert Sigmund von Wurmser</span> Austrian marshall

Dagobert Sigismund, Count von Wurmser was an Austrian field marshal during the French Revolutionary Wars. Although he fought in the Seven Years' War, the War of the Bavarian Succession, and mounted several successful campaigns in the Rhineland in the initial years of the French Revolutionary Wars, he is probably most remembered for his unsuccessful operations against Napoleon Bonaparte during the 1796 campaign in Italy.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Piedmontese Republic</span> French Sister Republic in Piedmont, Italy

The Piedmontese Republic was a revolutionary, provisional and internationally unrecognized government established in Turin between 1798 and 1799 on the territory of Piedmont during its military rule by the French First Republic.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Convention of Alessandria</span> 1800 Treaty during the War of the Second Coalition

The Convention of Alessandria was an armistice signed on 15 June 1800 between the French First Republic led by Napoleon and Austria during the War of the Second Coalition. Following the Austrian defeat at the Battle of Marengo, they agreed to evacuate Italy as far as the Mincio and abandon strongholds in Piedmont and Milan. Great Britain and Austria were allies and hoped to negotiate a peace treaty with France, but Napoleon insisted on separate treaties with each nation. The negotiations failed, and fighting resumed on 22 November 1800.

References

  1. 1 2 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History . London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p.  346. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States History from 458 A. D. to 1909, ed. by Benson John Lossing and, Woodrow Wilson (Harper & Brothers, 1910) p171.
  3. Reginald George Burton (2010). Napoleon's Campaigns in Italy 1796–1797 & 1800, p. 22. ISBN   978-0-85706-356-4
  4. Reginald George Burton (2010). Napoleon's Campaigns in Italy 1796–1797 & 1800, p. 33. ISBN   978-0-85706-356-4
  5. Reginald George Burton (2010). Napoleon's Campaigns in Italy 1796–1797 & 1800, p. 43. ISBN   978-0-85706-356-4
  6. Tyrrell, Henry Grattan (1911). History of Bridge Engineering. Chicago: Published by the author. pp.  153–154. Retrieved August 16, 2011. 210. The Sunderland bridge over the Wear at Wearmouth.
  7. Troyano, Leonardo Fernández (2003). Bridge Engineering: a Global Perspective. London: Thomas Telford Publishing. p. 49. ISBN   0-7277-3215-3.
  8. "Sunderland Wearmouth Bridge". Wearside Online. Archived from the original on November 27, 2011. Retrieved August 16, 2011.
  9. Boycott-Brown, p. 438.
  10. 1 2 Burton, Reginald George (2010). Napoleon's Campaigns in Italy 1796–1797 & 1800. pp. 75–80. ISBN   978-0-85706-356-4.
  11. Charters, Erica; Rosenhaft, Eve; Smith, Hannah (2012). Civilians and War in Europe, 1618-1815. Liverpool University Press. ISBN   978-1-84631-711-8.
  12. "Robert Burns - Auld Lang Syne". BBC . Retrieved January 26, 2012.
  13. "Robert Burns (1759-1796)". National Records of Scotland. May 31, 2013. Retrieved January 27, 2023.
  14. "Catherine the Great | Biography, Facts, & Accomplishments". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved March 22, 2019.