1799

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1799 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1799
MDCCXCIX
French Republican calendar 7–8
Ab urbe condita 2552
Armenian calendar 1248
ԹՎ ՌՄԽԸ
Assyrian calendar 6549
Balinese saka calendar 1720–1721
Bengali calendar 1206
Berber calendar 2749
British Regnal year 39  Geo. 3   40  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2343
Burmese calendar 1161
Byzantine calendar 7307–7308
Chinese calendar 戊午年 (Earth  Horse)
4495 or 4435
     to 
己未年 (Earth  Goat)
4496 or 4436
Coptic calendar 1515–1516
Discordian calendar 2965
Ethiopian calendar 1791–1792
Hebrew calendar 5559–5560
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1855–1856
 - Shaka Samvat 1720–1721
 - Kali Yuga 4899–4900
Holocene calendar 11799
Igbo calendar 799–800
Iranian calendar 1177–1178
Islamic calendar 1213–1214
Japanese calendar Kansei 11
(寛政11年)
Javanese calendar 1725–1726
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4132
Minguo calendar 113 before ROC
民前113年
Nanakshahi calendar 331
Thai solar calendar 2341–2342
Tibetan calendar 阳土马年
(male Earth-Horse)
1925 or 1544 or 772
     to 
阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1926 or 1545 or 773
July 15: French Captain Pierre-Francois Bouchard finds the Rosetta Stone Rosetta Stone.JPG
July 15: French Captain Pierre-François Bouchard finds the Rosetta Stone
September 25: Second Battle of Zurich Battle of zurich.jpg
September 25: Second Battle of Zurich
November 9: Coup of 18 Brumaire Bouchot - Le general Bonaparte au Conseil des Cinq-Cents.jpg
November 9: Coup of 18 Brumaire

1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1799th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 799th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1799, the Gregorian calendar was 11days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

January–June

July–December

Date unknown

Births

January–June

Carl Adolph von Basedow Carl Adolph von Basedow.jpg
Carl Adolph von Basedow
Honore de Balzac Honore de Balzac (1842).jpg
Honoré de Balzac
Alexander Pushkin AleksandrPushkin.jpg
Alexander Pushkin

July–December

Date unknown

Deaths

January–June

Qianlong Emperor Qing Lang Shi Zhu Hui <<Qing Gao Zong Gan Long Di Zhao Fu Xiang >> .jpg
Qianlong Emperor

July–December

Jacques-Etienne Montgolfier Jacques Etienne Montgolfier.jpg
Jacques-Étienne Montgolfier
George Washington Gilbert Stuart Williamstown Portrait of George Washington.jpg
George Washington

Related Research Articles

18th century Century

The 18th century lasted from January 1, 1701 (MDCCI) to December 31, 1800 (MDCCC). During the 18th century, elements of Enlightenment thinking culminated in the American, French, Polish, and Haitian revolutions. During the century, slave trading and human trafficking expanded across the shores of the Atlantic, while declining in Russia, China, and Korea. Revolutions began to challenge the legitimacy of monarchical and aristocratic power structures, including the structures and beliefs that supported the slave trade. The British Industrial Revolution began, leading to radical changes in human society and the environment.

1801 Calendar year

1801 (MDCCCI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1801st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 801st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1801, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1790s Decade

The 1790s was a decade that began on January 1, 1790, and ended on December 31, 1799. Considered as some of the Industrial Revolution's earlier days, the 1790s called for the start of an anti-imperialist world, as new democracies such as the French First Republic and the United States began flourishing at this era. Revolutions – both political and social – forever transformed global politics and art, as wars such as the French Revolutionary Wars and the American Revolutionary War moulded modern-day concepts of liberalism, partisanship, elections, and the political compass.

1807 Calendar year

1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1807th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 807th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1807, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1796 Calendar year

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1812 Calendar year

1812 (MDCCCXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1812th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 812th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1812, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1806 Calendar year

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1803 Calendar year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1805 Calendar year

1805 (MDCCCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1805th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 805th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1805, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1795 Calendar year

1795 (MDCCXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1795th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 795th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1795, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1780 Calendar year

1780 (MDCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1780th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 780th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1780, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1722 Calendar year

1722 (MDCCXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1722nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 722nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 22nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1722, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

French Revolutionary Wars Series of conflicts between the French Republic and several European monarchies (1792-1802)

The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of sweeping military conflicts lasting from 1792 until 1802 and resulting from the French Revolution. They pitted France against Britain, Austria, Prussia, Russia, and several other monarchies. They are divided in two periods: the War of the First Coalition (1792–97) and the War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802). Initially confined to Europe, the fighting gradually assumed a global dimension. After a decade of constant warfare and aggressive diplomacy, France had conquered territories in the Italian Peninsula, the Low Countries and the Rhineland in Europe and abandoned Louisiana in North America. French success in these conflicts ensured the spread of revolutionary principles over much of Europe.

Napoleonic era European history in the 1800s

The Napoleonic era is a period in the history of France and Europe. It is generally classified as including the fourth and final stage of the French Revolution, the first being the National Assembly, the second being the Legislative Assembly, and the third being the Directory. The Napoleonic era begins roughly with Napoleon Bonaparte's coup d'état, overthrowing the Directory, establishing the French Consulate, and ends during the Hundred Days and his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo. The Congress of Vienna soon set out to restore Europe to pre-French Revolution days. Napoleon brought political stability to a land torn by revolution and war. He made peace with the Roman Catholic Church and reversed the most radical religious policies of the Convention. In 1804 Napoleon promulgated the Civil Code, a revised body of civil law, which also helped stabilize French society. The Civil Code affirmed the political and legal equality of all adult men and established a merit-based society in which individuals advanced in education and employment because of talent rather than birth or social standing. The Civil Code confirmed many of the moderate revolutionary policies of the National Assembly but retracted measures passed by the more radical Convention. The code restored patriarchal authority in the family, for example, by making women and children subservient to male heads of households.

War of the Second Coalition Attempt to contain or eliminate Revolutionary France

The War of the Second Coalition was the second war on revolutionary France by most of the European monarchies, led by Britain, Austria and Russia, and including the Ottoman Empire, Portugal, Naples and various German monarchies, though Prussia did not join this coalition, and Spain supported France.

1776 Calendar year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1799 in Great Britain.

Italian and Swiss expedition Bonapartes second campaign in Italy

The Italian and Swiss expedition of 1799 was a military campaign undertaken by a combined Austro-Russian army under overall command of the Russian Marshal Alexander Suvorov against French forces in Piedmont and Lombardy and the Helvetic Republic. The expedition was part of the Italian campaigns of the French Revolutionary Wars in general, and the War of the Second Coalition in particular. It was one of 'two unprecedented Russian interventions in 1799', the other being the Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland.

Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland

The Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland was a military campaign from 27 August to 19 November 1799 during the War of the Second Coalition, in which an expeditionary force of British and Russian troops invaded the North Holland peninsula in the Batavian Republic. The campaign had two strategic objectives: to neutralize the Batavian fleet and to promote an uprising by followers of the former stadtholder William V against the Batavian government. The invasion was opposed by a slightly smaller joint Franco-Batavian army. Tactically, the Anglo-Russian forces were successful initially, defeating the defenders in the battles of Callantsoog and the Krabbendam, but subsequent battles went against the Anglo-Russian forces. Following a defeat at Castricum, the Duke of York, the British supreme commander, decided upon a strategic retreat to the original bridgehead in the extreme north of the peninsula. Subsequently, an agreement was negotiated with the supreme commander of the Franco-Batavian forces, General Guillaume Marie Anne Brune, that allowed the Anglo-Russian forces to evacuate this bridgehead unmolested. However, the expedition partly succeeded in its first objective, capturing a significant proportion of the Batavian fleet.

This is a timeline of the 18th century.

References

  1. "Historical Events for Year 1799 | OnThisDay.com". Historyorb.com. Retrieved July 11, 2016.
    • (in Dutch) Krayenhoff, C.R.T. (1832) Geschiedkundige Beschouwing van den Oorlog op het grondgebied der Bataafsche Republiek in 1799. J.C. Vieweg Page=115
  2. Nadaraja, T. (1972). The Legal System of Ceylon in Its Historical Setting. E. J. Brill. p. 181.
  3. Formica, Marina (2004). "The Protagonists and the Principal Phases of the Roman Republic of 1798 to 1799". In Burton, Deborah; et al. (eds.). Tosca's Prism: Three Moments of Western Cultural History. Northeastern University Press. p. 67.
  4. "not known". International Review of Military History. ICMH, International Commission of Military History: 40. 1984.
  5. "The Autobiography of Sir John Barrow". The United Service Magazine. H. Colburn. 1847. pp.  337 . Retrieved November 4, 2008.
  6. Woodbury, Robert S. (1960). "The Legend of Eli Whitney and Interchangeable Parts". Technology and Culture . 1. doi:10.2307/3101392. JSTOR   3101392.
  7. An encyclopedia of British women writers (Rev. and expanded ed.). New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press. 1998. p. 1. ISBN   0813525438.
  8. Little, Iain (1984). Honoré de Balzac, Le père Goriot. Harlow: Longman. p. 5. ISBN   9780582781863.
  9. "Oscar I | king of Sweden and Norway". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  10. James, Winston (2010). The Struggles of John Brown Russwurm. New York, NY: New York University Press. pp. 25, 90, 105. ISBN   978-0-8147-4289-1.
  11. Lichtenberg, Georg (2012). Georg Christoph Lichtenberg : philosophical writings, selected from the Waste books. Albany: State University of New York Press. p. 2. ISBN   9781438441986.
  12. Sadie, Stanley (2000). Mozart and his operas. London New York: Macmillan Reference Ltd. St. Martin's Press. p. 113. ISBN   9780333790199.
  13. Mueller von Asow; Erich Hermann; Mueller von Asow (1962). Collected Correspondence and Papers. Barrie and Rockliff. p. 67.