1799

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1799 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1799
MDCCXCIX
French Republican calendar 7–8
Ab urbe condita 2552
Armenian calendar 1248
ԹՎ ՌՄԽԸ
Assyrian calendar 6549
Balinese saka calendar 1720–1721
Bengali calendar 1206
Berber calendar 2749
British Regnal year 39  Geo. 3   40  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2343
Burmese calendar 1161
Byzantine calendar 7307–7308
Chinese calendar 戊午(Earth  Horse)
4495 or 4435
     to 
己未年 (Earth  Goat)
4496 or 4436
Coptic calendar 1515–1516
Discordian calendar 2965
Ethiopian calendar 1791–1792
Hebrew calendar 5559–5560
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1855–1856
 - Shaka Samvat 1720–1721
 - Kali Yuga 4899–4900
Holocene calendar 11799
Igbo calendar 799–800
Iranian calendar 1177–1178
Islamic calendar 1213–1214
Japanese calendar Kansei 11
(寛政11年)
Javanese calendar 1725–1726
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4132
Minguo calendar 113 before ROC
民前113年
Nanakshahi calendar 331
Thai solar calendar 2341–2342
Tibetan calendar 阳土马年
(male Earth-Horse)
1925 or 1544 or 772
     to 
阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1926 or 1545 or 773
July 15: French Captain Pierre-Francois Bouchard finds the Rosetta Stone Rosetta Stone.JPG
July 15: French Captain Pierre-François Bouchard finds the Rosetta Stone

1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1799th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 799th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1799, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

January–June

July–December

Date unknown

Births

January–June

Carl Adolph von Basedow Carl Adolph von Basedow.jpg
Carl Adolph von Basedow
Honore de Balzac Honore de Balzac (1842).jpg
Honoré de Balzac
Alexander Pushkin AleksandrPushkin.jpg
Alexander Pushkin

July–December

Date unknown

Deaths

January–June

Qianlong Qing Lang Shi Zhu Hui <<Qing Gao Zong Gan Long Di Zhao Fu Xiang >> .jpg
Qianlong

July–December

Jacques-Etienne Montgolfier Jacques Etienne Montgolfier.jpg
Jacques-Étienne Montgolfier
George Washington Gilbert Stuart Williamstown Portrait of George Washington.jpg
George Washington

Related Research Articles

1801 1801

1801 (MDCCCI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1801st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 801st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1801, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1790s decade

The 1790s decade ran from January 1, 1790, to December 31, 1799.

1807 1807

1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1807th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 807th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1807, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1796 1796

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1652 (MDCLII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1652nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 652nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1652, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 1800

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1806 1806

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1803 1803

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1805 1805

1805 (MDCCCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1805th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 805th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1805, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1793 1793

1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1793rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 793rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1793, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1798 1798

1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1798th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 798th year of the 2nd millennium, the 98th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1798, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1795 1795

1795 (MDCCXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1795th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 795th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1795, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1780 1780

1780 (MDCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1780th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 780th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1780, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1722 1722

1722 (MDCCXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1722nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 722nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 22nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1722, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1776 1776

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1799 in Great Britain.

Vlieter incident Dutch surrender during the War of the Second Coalition

In the Vlieter incident on 30 August 1799, a squadron of the Batavian Navy, commanded by Rear-Admiral Samuel Story, surrendered to the British navy. The incident occurred during the Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland. It took place in the tidal trench between Texel and the mainland that was known as De Vlieter, near Wieringen.

Samuel Story Dutch admiral

Samuel Story was a vice admiral of the Batavian Republic Navy. He commanded the squadron that surrendered without a fight to the Royal Navy at the Vlieter incident in 1799.

Theodorus Frederik van Capellen Dutch admiral

Vice-admiral Jonkheer Theodorus Frederik van Capellen, GCMWO, KCB was a Dutch naval officer. He was married to Petronella de Lange (1779–1835). Alexandrine Tinné, female explorer and pioneering photographer, was his granddaughter.

Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland

The Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland was a military campaign from 27 August to 19 November 1799 during the War of the Second Coalition, in which an expeditionary force of British and Russian troops invaded the North Holland peninsula in the Batavian Republic. The campaign had two strategic objectives: to neutralize the Batavian fleet and to promote an uprising by followers of the former stadtholder William V against the Batavian government. The invasion was opposed by a slightly smaller joint Franco-Batavian army. Tactically, the Anglo-Russian forces were successful initially, defeating the defenders in the battles of Callantsoog and the Krabbendam, but subsequent battles went against the Anglo-Russian forces. Following a defeat at Castricum, the Duke of York, the British supreme commander, decided upon a strategic retreat to the original bridgehead in the extreme north of the peninsula. Subsequently, an agreement was negotiated with the supreme commander of the Franco-Batavian forces, General Guillaume Marie Anne Brune, that allowed the Anglo-Russian forces to evacuate this bridgehead unmolested. However, the expedition partly succeeded in its first objective, capturing a significant proportion of the Batavian fleet.

References

  1. "Historical Events for Year 1799 | OnThisDay.com". Historyorb.com. Retrieved July 11, 2016.
  2. Nadaraja, T. (1972). The Legal System of Ceylon in Its Historical Setting. E. J. Brill. p. 181.
  3. Formica, Marina (2004). "The Protagonists and the Principal Phases of the Roman Republic of 1798 to 1799". In Burton, Deborah; et al. (eds.). Tosca's Prism: Three Moments of Western Cultural History. Northeastern University Press. p. 67.
  4. Woodbury, Robert S. (1960). "The Legend of Eli Whitney and Interchangeable Parts". Technology and Culture . 1.