1805

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1805 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1805
MDCCCV
French Republican calendar 13–14
Ab urbe condita 2558
Armenian calendar 1254
ԹՎ ՌՄԾԴ
Assyrian calendar 6555
Balinese saka calendar 1726–1727
Bengali calendar 1212
Berber calendar 2755
British Regnal year 45  Geo. 3   46  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2349
Burmese calendar 1167
Byzantine calendar 7313–7314
Chinese calendar 甲子(Wood  Rat)
4501 or 4441
     to 
乙丑年 (Wood  Ox)
4502 or 4442
Coptic calendar 1521–1522
Discordian calendar 2971
Ethiopian calendar 1797–1798
Hebrew calendar 5565–5566
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1861–1862
 - Shaka Samvat 1726–1727
 - Kali Yuga 4905–4906
Holocene calendar 11805
Igbo calendar 805–806
Iranian calendar 1183–1184
Islamic calendar 1219–1220
Japanese calendar Bunka 2
(文化2年)
Javanese calendar 1731–1732
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4138
Minguo calendar 107 before ROC
民前107年
Nanakshahi calendar 337
Thai solar calendar 2347–2348
Tibetan calendar 阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1931 or 1550 or 778
     to 
阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
1932 or 1551 or 779
October 21: Battle of Trafalgar Turner, The Battle of Trafalgar (1806).jpg
October 21: Battle of Trafalgar

1805 (MDCCCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1805th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 805th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1805, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

After thirteen years the First French Empire abolished the French Republican Calendar in favour of the Gregorian calendar.

Events

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

December 2: Battle of Austerlitz La bataille d'Austerlitz. 2 decembre 1805 (Francois Gerard).jpg
December 2: Battle of Austerlitz

Date unknown

Births

January–June

Hans Christian Andersen HCA by Thora Hallager 1869.jpg
Hans Christian Andersen

July–December

Fanny Mendelssohn Fanny Hensel 1842.jpg
Fanny Mendelssohn
Joseph Smith Joseph Smith, Jr. portrait owned by Joseph Smith III.jpg
Joseph Smith
Jeanne Deroin Jeanne Deroin 1.jpeg
Jeanne Deroin

Undated

Deaths

January–June

Friedrich Schiller Friedrich Schiller by Ludovike Simanowiz.jpg
Friedrich Schiller
Lord Nelson HoratioNelson1.jpg
Lord Nelson

July–December

Eleonore Prochaska Eleonore Prochaska.jpg
Eleonore Prochaska

Undated

Related Research Articles

1801 1801

1801 (MDCCCI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1801st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 801st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1801, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1809 1809

1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1809th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 809th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1809, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1815 1815

1815 (MDCCCXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1815th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 815th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1815, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1814 1814

1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1814th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 814th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1814, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1812 1812

1812 (MDCCCXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1812th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 812th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1812, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1802 1802

1802 (MDCCCII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1802nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 802nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1802, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1813 1813

1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1813th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 813th year of the 2nd millennium, the 13th year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1813, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1806 1806

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1803 1803

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1804 1804

1804 (MDCCCIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1804th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 804th year of the 2nd millennium, the 4th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1804, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1799 1799

1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1799th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 799th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1799, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

War of the Third Coalition

The War of the Third Coalition was a European conflict spanning the years 1803 to 1806. During the war, France and its client states under Napoleon I, defeated an alliance, the Third Coalition, made up of the United Kingdom, the Holy Roman Empire, the Russian Empire, Naples, Sicily and Sweden. Prussia remained neutral during the war.

Battle of Ulm

The Battle of Ulm on 16–19 October 1805 was a series of skirmishes, at the end of the Ulm Campaign, which allowed Napoleon I to trap an entire Austrian army under the command of Karl Freiherr Mack von Leiberich with minimal losses and to force its surrender near Ulm in the Electorate of Bavaria.

Elchingen Place in Bavaria, Germany

Elchingen is a municipality about 7 km east of Ulm–Neu-Ulm in the district of Neu-Ulm in Bavaria, Germany

Battle of Elchingen

The Battle of Elchingen, fought on 14 October 1805, saw French forces under Michel Ney rout an Austrian corps led by Johann Sigismund Riesch. This defeat led to a large part of the Austrian army being invested in the fortress of Ulm by the army of Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte of France while other formations fled to the east. Soon afterward, the Austrians trapped in Ulm surrendered and the French mopped up most of the remaining Austrians forces, bringing the Ulm Campaign to a close.

Battle of Haslach-Jungingen

The Battle of Haslach-Jungingen, also known as the Battle of Albeck, fought on 11 October 1805 at Ulm-Jungingen north of Ulm at the Danube between French and Austrian forces, was part of the War of the Third Coalition, which was a part of the greater Napoleonic Wars. The outcome of this battle was a French victory.

Ulm campaign Decisive military campaign by Napoleon

The Ulm campaign was a series of French and Bavarian military maneuvers and battles to outflank and capture an Austrian army in 1805 during the War of the Third Coalition. It took place in the vicinity of and inside the Swabian city of Ulm. The French Grande Armée, led by Napoleon Bonaparte, comprised 210,000 troops organized into seven corps, and hoped to knock out the Austrian army in the Danube before Russian reinforcements could arrive. Through rapid marching, Napoleon conducted a large wheeling maneuver that captured an Austrian army of 23,000 under General Mack on 20 October at Ulm, bringing the total number of Austrian prisoners in the campaign to 60,000. The campaign is generally regarded as a strategic masterpiece and was influential in the development of the Schlieffen Plan in the late 19th century.

Events from the year 1805 in France.

Johann Sigismund Graf von Riesch joined the army of Habsburg Austria as a cavalry officer and, during his career, fought against the Kingdom of Prussia, Ottoman Turkey, Revolutionary France, and Napoleon's French Empire. He became a general officer during the French Revolutionary Wars and held important commands during the War of the Second Coalition. He displayed a talent for leading cavalry formations, but proved less capable when given corps-sized commands. During the 1805 Ulm Campaign in the Napoleonic Wars, the French badly defeated his corps and forced it to surrender soon afterward. From 1806 to his death in 1821, he was the Proprietor (Inhaber) of an Austrian cavalry regiment.

Franz Freiherr von Werneck, enlisted in the army of Habsburg Austria and fought in the Austro-Turkish War, the French Revolutionary Wars, and the Napoleonic Wars. He enjoyed a distinguished career until 1797, when he lost a battle and was dismissed as punishment. He was only reinstated in 1805. In that year he surrendered his command and was later brought up on charges. He died while awaiting a court-martial.

References

  1. Commission, Michigan Historical; Society, Michigan State Historical. Michigan Historical Collections. Michigan Historical Commission. p. 218.
  2. Karen Jones and John Wills, The American West: Competing Visions (Edinburgh University Press, 2009) p17
  3. Kinley Brauer and William E. Wright, Austria in the Age of the French Revolution, 1789-1815 (Berghahn Books, 1990) p11
  4. "Baird, David", in A New General Biographical Dictionary, Volume 3, ed. by Hugh James Rose (T. Fellowes, 1857) p20
  5. Tales of the Wars; Or, Naval and Military Chronicle (William Mark Clark, 1836) p329
  6. The Englishman's library: comprising a series of historical, biographical, and national information (Charles Knight, 1824) p165
  7. H. Arnold Barton, Scandinavia in the Revolutionary Era: 1760–1815 (University of Minnesota Press, 1986) p267
  8. Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution (Courier Corporation, 2012) p210