1806

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1806 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1806
MDCCCVI
Ab urbe condita 2559
Armenian calendar 1255
ԹՎ ՌՄԾԵ
Assyrian calendar 6556
Balinese saka calendar 1727–1728
Bengali calendar 1213
Berber calendar 2756
British Regnal year 46  Geo. 3   47  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2350
Burmese calendar 1168
Byzantine calendar 7314–7315
Chinese calendar 乙丑(Wood  Ox)
4502 or 4442
     to 
丙寅年 (Fire  Tiger)
4503 or 4443
Coptic calendar 1522–1523
Discordian calendar 2972
Ethiopian calendar 1798–1799
Hebrew calendar 5566–5567
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1862–1863
 - Shaka Samvat 1727–1728
 - Kali Yuga 4906–4907
Holocene calendar 11806
Igbo calendar 806–807
Iranian calendar 1184–1185
Islamic calendar 1220–1221
Japanese calendar Bunka 3
(文化3年)
Javanese calendar 1732–1733
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4139
Minguo calendar 106 before ROC
民前106年
Nanakshahi calendar 338
Thai solar calendar 2348–2349
Tibetan calendar 阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
1932 or 1551 or 779
     to 
阳火虎年
(male Fire-Tiger)
1933 or 1552 or 780

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

January 8: Battle of Blaauwberg Storming the Cape 1806.jpg
January 8: Battle of Blaauwberg
October 14: Battle of Jena-Auerstedt E.Jean.Horace.Vernet.Battleof.Jena1836.jpg
October 14: Battle of Jena–Auerstedt
October 27: French troops enter Berlin. Charles Meynier - Entree de Napoleon a Berlin. 27 octobre 1806.jpg
October 27: French troops enter Berlin.

Events

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Births

January–June

Isambard Kingdom Brunel Robert Howlett (Isambard Kingdom Brunel Standing Before the Launching Chains of the Great Eastern), The Metropolitan Museum of Art (cropped).jpg
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Emma Catherine Embury Henry Inman - Emma Embury - NPG.2016.23 - National Portrait Gallery.jpg
Emma Catherine Embury
J. V. Snellman JV Snellman.jpg
J. V. Snellman
John Stuart Mill John Stuart Mill by London Stereoscopic Company, c1870.jpg
John Stuart Mill

July–December

Max Stirner Stirner-kar1900.jpg
Max Stirner
Emilia Plater Emilia Plater.PNG
Emilia Plater

Date unknown

Deaths

January–June

William Pitt the Younger OlderPittThe Younger.jpg
William Pitt the Younger

July–December

Charles-Augustin de Coulomb Charles de Coulomb.png
Charles-Augustin de Coulomb
Benjamin Banneker Benjamin Banneker mural cropped.tif
Benjamin Banneker

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1809 Calendar year

1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1809th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 809th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1809, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1807 Calendar year

1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1807th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 807th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1807, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1796 Calendar year

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1808 Calendar year

1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1808th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 808th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1808, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1815 Calendar year

1815 (MDCCCXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1815th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 815th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1815, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1814 Calendar year

1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1814th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 814th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1814, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1813 Calendar year

1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1813th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 813th year of the 2nd millennium, the 13th year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1813, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1762 (MDCCLXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1762nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 762nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1762, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1803 Calendar year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1805 Calendar year

1805 (MDCCCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1805th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 805th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1805, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Napoleonic Wars 1803–1815 wars involving the French Empire

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions. It produced a period of French domination over most of continental Europe. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon: the Third Coalition (1805), the Fourth (1806–07), the Fifth (1809), the Sixth (1813–14), and the Seventh (1815).

War of the First Coalition 1790s war to contain Revolutionary France

The War of the First Coalition was a set of wars that several European powers fought between 1792 and 1797 initially against the constitutional Kingdom of France and then the French Republic that succeeded it. They were only loosely allied and fought without much apparent coordination or agreement; each power had its eye on a different part of France it wanted to appropriate after a French defeat, which never occurred.

Napoleonic era European history in the 1800s

The Napoleonic era is a period in the history of France and Europe. It is generally classified as including the fourth and final stage of the French Revolution, the first being the National Assembly, the second being the Legislative Assembly, and the third being the Directory. The Napoleonic era begins roughly with Napoleon Bonaparte's coup d'état, overthrowing the Directory, establishing the French Consulate, and ends during the Hundred Days and his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo. The Congress of Vienna soon set out to restore Europe to pre-French Revolution days. Napoleon brought political stability to a land torn by revolution and war. He made peace with the Roman Catholic Church and reversed the most radical religious policies of the Convention. In 1804 Napoleon promulgated the Civil Code, a revised body of civil law, which also helped stabilize French society. The Civil Code affirmed the political and legal equality of all adult men and established a merit-based society in which individuals advanced in education and employment because of talent rather than birth or social standing. The Civil Code confirmed many of the moderate revolutionary policies of the National Assembly but retracted measures passed by the more radical Convention. The code restored patriarchal authority in the family, for example, by making women and children subservient to male heads of households.

War of the Fourth Coalition Part of the Napoleonic Wars

The Fourth Coalition fought against Napoleon's French Empire and were defeated in a war spanning 1806–1807. The main coalition partners were Prussia and Russia with Saxony, Sweden, and Great Britain also contributing. Excluding Prussia, some members of the coalition had previously been fighting France as part of the Third Coalition, and there was no intervening period of general peace. On 9 October 1806, Prussia joined a renewed coalition, fearing the rise in French power after the defeat of Austria and establishment of the French-sponsored Confederation of the Rhine. Prussia and Russia mobilized for a fresh campaign with Prussia massing troops in Saxony.

Grand Duchy of Berg Client state of the French Empire (1806–1813)

The Grand Duchy of Berg, also known as the Grand Duchy of Berg and Cleves, was a territorial grand duchy established in 1806 by Emperor Napoleon after his victory at the Battle of Austerlitz (1805) on territories between the French Empire at the Rhine river and the German Kingdom of Westphalia.

Events from the year 1806 in France.

First French Empire 1804–1815 empire of Napoleon Bonaparte

The First French Empire, officially the French Empire, also known as the Napoleonic Empire, was the empire ruled by Napoleon Bonaparte, who established French hegemony over much of continental Europe at the beginning of the 19th century. It lasted from 18 May 1804 to 11 April 1814 and again briefly from 20 March 1815 to 7 July 1815.,,

Events from the year 1814 in Germany.

Events from the year 1813 in Germany.

Events from the year 1806 in Germany.

References

  1. Hibbert, Christopher (1994). Nelson: A Personal History. p. 382.
  2. Davis, John (2006). Naples and Napoleon: Southern Italy and the European Revolutions, 1780–1860. Oxford University Press. ISBN   9780198207559.
  3. 1 2 Abbott, John S. C. (1869). A History of Joseph, King of Naples. New York: Harper.
  4. Coleman, Helen Turnbull Waite (1956). Banners in the Wilderness: The Early Years of Washington and Jefferson College. University of Pittsburgh Press. p.  210. OCLC   2191890.
  5. "Auckland Islands", in Exploring Polar Frontiers: A Historical Encyclopedia, ed. by William J. Mills (ABC-CLIO, 2003) p39
  6. Jones, A. G. E. (1970). "Captain Abraham Bristow and the Auckland Islands". Notes and Queries . 17 (10): 369–371. doi:10.1093/nq/17-10-369.
  7. Sandweiss, Lee Ann (2000). Seeking St. Louis: Voices from a River City, 1670–2000. Missouri History Museum. p. 41.
  8. 1 2 Petre, F. Loraine (1907). Napoleon's Conquest of Prussia – 1806. John Lane Company. p. xv.
  9. Marzagali, Silvia (2007). "Napoleon's Continental Blockade – An Effective Substitute to Naval Weakness?". In Elleman, Bruce A.; Paine, S. C. M. (eds.). Naval Blockades and Seapower: Strategies and Counter-Strategies, 1805-2005. London: Routledge. p. 25. ISBN   9786611158309.
  10. "History". Colgate-Palmolive. Retrieved December 5, 2020.
  11. Johan Vilhelm Snellman at the Encyclopædia Britannica
  12. "Elizabeth Carter - British author". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved January 3, 2017.