1807

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1807 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1807
MDCCCVII
Ab urbe condita 2560
Armenian calendar 1256
ԹՎ ՌՄԾԶ
Assyrian calendar 6557
Balinese saka calendar 1728–1729
Bengali calendar 1214
Berber calendar 2757
British Regnal year 47  Geo. 3   48  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2351
Burmese calendar 1169
Byzantine calendar 7315–7316
Chinese calendar 丙寅(Fire  Tiger)
4503 or 4443
     to 
丁卯年 (Fire  Rabbit)
4504 or 4444
Coptic calendar 1523–1524
Discordian calendar 2973
Ethiopian calendar 1799–1800
Hebrew calendar 5567–5568
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1863–1864
 - Shaka Samvat 1728–1729
 - Kali Yuga 4907–4908
Holocene calendar 11807
Igbo calendar 807–808
Iranian calendar 1185–1186
Islamic calendar 1221–1222
Japanese calendar Bunka 4
(文化4年)
Javanese calendar 1733–1734
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4140
Minguo calendar 105 before ROC
民前105年
Nanakshahi calendar 339
Thai solar calendar 2349–2350
Tibetan calendar 阳火虎年
(male Fire-Tiger)
1933 or 1552 or 780
     to 
阴火兔年
(female Fire-Rabbit)
1934 or 1553 or 781
June 14: Battle of Friedland Napoleon friedland.jpg
June 14: Battle of Friedland

1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1807th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 807th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1807, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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Robert E. Lee

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Giuseppe Garibaldi

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Pasquale Paoli

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Angelica Kauffman

Related Research Articles

1800s (decade) Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1800s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1800, and ended on December 31, 1809. The term "eighteen-hundreds" can also mean the years between 1800 and 1899, and is almost synonymous with the 19th century (1801–1900). This article refers to the decade comprising 1800–1809.

1809 Calendar year

1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1809th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 809th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1809, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1796 Calendar year

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1810s Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1810s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1810, and ended on December 31, 1819.

1808 Calendar year

1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1808th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 808th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1808, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1815 Calendar year

1815 (MDCCCXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1815th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 815th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1815, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1794 Calendar year

1794 (MDCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1794th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 794th year of the 2nd millennium, the 94th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1794, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1810 Calendar year

1810 (MDCCCX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1810th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 810th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1810, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 Calendar year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1806 Calendar year

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1803 Calendar year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Napoleonic Wars 1803–1815 wars involving the French Empire

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions. It produced a period of French domination over most of continental Europe. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon: the Third Coalition (1805), the Fourth (1806–07), the Fifth (1809), the Sixth (1813–14), and the Seventh (1815).

Battle of Eylau 1807 battle between the French and Russian Empires at Eylau, Prussia

The Battle of Eylau or Battle of Preussisch-Eylau, 7 and 8 February 1807, was a bloody and strategically inconclusive battle between Napoleon's Grande Armée and the Imperial Russian Army under the command of Levin August von Bennigsen near the town of Preussisch Eylau in East Prussia. Late in the battle, the Russians received timely reinforcements from a Prussian division of von L'Estocq. After 1945 the town was renamed Bagrationovsk as a part of Kaliningrad Oblast, Russia. The engagement was fought during the War of the Fourth Coalition, part of the Napoleonic Wars.

Continental System 1806–1814 embargo of Napoleonic Europe against Britain

The Continental Blockade, or Continental System, was the foreign policy of Napoleon Bonaparte against the United Kingdom during the Napoleonic Wars. As a response to the naval blockade of the French coasts enacted by the British government on 16 May 1806, Napoleon issued the Berlin Decree on 21 November 1806, which brought into effect a large-scale embargo against British trade. The embargo was applied intermittently, ending on 11 April 1814 after Napoleon's first abdication. The blockade caused little economic damage to the UK, although British exports to the continent dropped from 55% to 25% between 1802 and 1806. As Napoleon realized that extensive trade was going through Spain and Russia, he invaded those two countries. His forces were tied down in Spain—in which the Spanish War of Independence was occurring simultaneously—and suffered severely in, and ultimately retreated from, Russia in 1812.

Napoleonic era European history in the 1800s

The Napoleonic era is a period in the history of France and Europe. It is generally classified as including the fourth and final stage of the French Revolution, the first being the National Assembly, the second being the Legislative Assembly, and the third being the Directory. The Napoleonic era begins roughly with Napoleon Bonaparte's coup d'état, overthrowing the Directory, establishing the French Consulate, and ends during the Hundred Days and his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo. The Congress of Vienna soon set out to restore Europe to pre-French Revolution days. Napoleon brought political stability to a land torn by revolution and war. He made peace with the Roman Catholic Church and reversed the most radical religious policies of the Convention. In 1804 Napoleon promulgated the Civil Code, a revised body of civil law, which also helped stabilize French society. The Civil Code affirmed the political and legal equality of all adult men and established a merit-based society in which individuals advanced in education and employment because of talent rather than birth or social standing. The Civil Code confirmed many of the moderate revolutionary policies of the National Assembly but retracted measures passed by the more radical Convention. The code restored patriarchal authority in the family, for example, by making women and children subservient to male heads of households.

War of the Fourth Coalition Part of the Napoleonic Wars

The Fourth Coalition fought against Napoleon's French Empire and were defeated in a war spanning 1806–1807. The main coalition partners were Prussia and Russia with Saxony, Sweden, and Great Britain also contributing. Excluding Prussia, some members of the coalition had previously been fighting France as part of the Third Coalition, and there was no intervening period of general peace. On 9 October 1806, Prussia joined a renewed coalition, fearing the rise in French power after the defeat of Austria and establishment of the French-sponsored Confederation of the Rhine. Prussia and Russia mobilized for a fresh campaign with Prussia massing troops in Saxony.

Events from the year 1807 in the United Kingdom.

Events from the year 1806 in France.

Events from the year 1807 in France.

Events from the year 1802 in France.

References

  1. William S. Dudley, ed. The Naval War of 1812: A Documentary History (Naval Historical Center, 1985) p34
  2. Stephen Tomkins, The Clapham Sect: How Wilberforce's Circle Transformed Britain (Lion Books, 2012) p200
  3. William Hodgson, The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte, Once Emperor of the French, who Died in Exile, at St. Helena, After a Captivity of Six Years' Duration (Orlando Hodgson, 1841) p384
  4. "William Wilberforce (1759–1833)" . Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  5. "Abolition of the Slave Trade 1807". BBC. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007. Retrieved September 11, 2007.
  6. Farndale, W. E. (1950). The Secret of Mow Cop: a new appraisal of the origins of Primitive Methodism. London: Epworth Press.
  7. "Sketch of the Canton Protestant Mission", by Rev. John Chalmers, in The Chinese Recorder and Missionary Journal, Volume 7 (American Presbyterian Mission Press, 1876) p174
  8. Francis Haskell and Nicholas Penny, Taste and the Antique: The Lure of Classical Sculpture, 1500-1900 (Yale University Press, 1982) p281