1809

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1809 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1809
MDCCCIX
Ab urbe condita 2562
Armenian calendar 1258
ԹՎ ՌՄԾԸ
Assyrian calendar 6559
Balinese saka calendar 1730–1731
Bengali calendar 1216
Berber calendar 2759
British Regnal year 49  Geo. 3   50  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2353
Burmese calendar 1171
Byzantine calendar 7317–7318
Chinese calendar 戊辰年 (Earth  Dragon)
4505 or 4445
     to 
己巳年 (Earth  Snake)
4506 or 4446
Coptic calendar 1525–1526
Discordian calendar 2975
Ethiopian calendar 1801–1802
Hebrew calendar 5569–5570
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1865–1866
 - Shaka Samvat 1730–1731
 - Kali Yuga 4909–4910
Holocene calendar 11809
Igbo calendar 809–810
Iranian calendar 1187–1188
Islamic calendar 1223–1224
Japanese calendar Bunka 6
(文化6年)
Javanese calendar 1735–1736
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4142
Minguo calendar 103 before ROC
民前103年
Nanakshahi calendar 341
Thai solar calendar 2351–2352
Tibetan calendar 阳土龙年
(male Earth-Dragon)
1935 or 1554 or 782
     to 
阴土蛇年
(female Earth-Snake)
1936 or 1555 or 783
January 16: Battle of Corunna Battle of Corunna.jpg
January 16: Battle of Corunna

1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1809th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 809th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1809, the Gregorian calendar was 12days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

February 11: Robert Fulton patents steamboat Fulton.jpg
February 11: Robert Fulton patents steamboat

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryJune

Louis Braille Braille.jpg
Louis Braille
Edgar Allan Poe Edgar Allan Poe, circa 1849, restored, squared off.jpg
Edgar Allan Poe
Felix Mendelssohn Mendelssohn Bartholdy.jpg
Felix Mendelssohn
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln head on shoulders photo portrait.jpg
Abraham Lincoln
Charles Darwin Charles Darwin seated crop.jpg
Charles Darwin

JulyDecember

Kit Carson Kit Carson photograph restored.jpg
Kit Carson

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Joseph Haydn Joseph Haydn.jpg
Joseph Haydn
Thomas Paine Portrait of Thomas Paine.jpg
Thomas Paine
Daniel Lambert Marshall Lambert.jpg
Daniel Lambert

JulyDecember

Matthew Boulton Matthew Boulton - Carl Frederik von Breda.jpg
Matthew Boulton

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Corunna</span> 1809 Battle of the Peninsular War

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General William Carr Beresford, 1st Viscount Beresford, 1st Marquis of Campo Maior, was an Anglo-Irish soldier and politician. A general in the British Army and a Marshal in the Portuguese Army, he fought alongside The Duke of Wellington in the Peninsular War and held the office of Master-General of the Ordnance in 1828 in Wellington's first ministry. He led the 1806 failed British invasion of Buenos Aires.

Events from the year 1809 in the United Kingdom.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">First Battle of Porto</span> 1809 battle during the Peninsular War

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François Jean Werlé was a Général de Brigade of the First French Empire who saw action during the Napoleonic Wars and died fighting against the British during the Peninsular War.

Events from the year 1813 in France.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Battle of Alcántara (1809)</span> 1809 battle of the Peninsular War

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Étienne Pierre Sylvestre Ricard</span>

Étienne Pierre Sylvestre Ricard was a prominent French division commander during the 1814 Campaign in Northeast France. In 1791 he joined an infantry regiment and spent several years in Corsica. Transferred to the Army of Italy in 1799, he became an aide-de-camp to Louis-Gabriel Suchet. He fought at Pozzolo in 1800. He became aide-de-camp to Marshal Nicolas Soult in 1805 and was at Austerlitz and Jena where his actions earned a promotion to general of brigade. From 1808 he functioned as Soult's chief of staff during the Peninsular War, serving at Corunna, Braga, First and Second Porto. During this time he sent a letter to Soult's generals asking them if the marshal should assume royal powers in Northern Portugal. When he found out, Napoleon was furious and he sidelined Ricard for two years.

Events from the year 1809 in Germany.

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