1810

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1810 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1810
MDCCCX
Ab urbe condita 2563
Armenian calendar 1259
ԹՎ ՌՄԾԹ
Assyrian calendar 6560
Balinese saka calendar 1731–1732
Bengali calendar 1217
Berber calendar 2760
British Regnal year 50  Geo. 3   51  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2354
Burmese calendar 1172
Byzantine calendar 7318–7319
Chinese calendar 己巳年 (Earth  Snake)
4506 or 4446
     to 
庚午年 (Metal  Horse)
4507 or 4447
Coptic calendar 1526–1527
Discordian calendar 2976
Ethiopian calendar 1802–1803
Hebrew calendar 5570–5571
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1866–1867
 - Shaka Samvat 1731–1732
 - Kali Yuga 4910–4911
Holocene calendar 11810
Igbo calendar 810–811
Iranian calendar 1188–1189
Islamic calendar 1224–1225
Japanese calendar Bunka 7
(文化7年)
Javanese calendar 1736–1737
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4143
Minguo calendar 102 before ROC
民前102年
Nanakshahi calendar 342
Thai solar calendar 2352–2353
Tibetan calendar 阴土蛇年
(female Earth-Snake)
1936 or 1555 or 783
     to 
阳金马年
(male Iron-Horse)
1937 or 1556 or 784
August 20-27: Battle of Grand Port Grand Port mg6971.jpg
August 20–27: Battle of Grand Port

1810 (MDCCCX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1810th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 810th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1810, the Gregorian calendar was 12days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Births

January–June

Frederic Chopin Frederic Chopin by Bisson, 1849.png
Frédéric Chopin
Robert Schumann Schumann-photo1850.jpg
Robert Schumann

July–December

Theodor Schwann Theodor Schwann Litho.jpg
Theodor Schwann

Date unknown

Deaths

January–June

Henry Cavendish Cavendish Henry signature.jpg
Henry Cavendish

July–December

Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz Grassi, Josef Mathias - Luise von Mecklenburg-Strelitz.jpg
Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1809</span> Calendar year

1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1809th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 809th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1809, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1810s</span> Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1810s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1810, and ended on December 31, 1819.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1815</span> Calendar year

1815 (MDCCCXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1815th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 815th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1815, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1814</span> Calendar year

1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1814th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 814th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1814, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1812</span> Calendar year

1812 (MDCCCXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1812th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 812th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1812, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1813</span> Calendar year

1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1813th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 813th year of the 2nd millennium, the 13th year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1813, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1805</span> Calendar year

1805 (MDCCCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1805th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 805th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1805, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Napoleonic Wars</span> 1803–1815 wars involving the French Empire

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European states formed into various coalitions. It produced a period of French domination over most of continental Europe. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and the French Revolutionary Wars consisting of the War of the First Coalition (1792–1797) and the War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802). The Napoleonic Wars are often described as five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon: the Third Coalition (1803–1806), the Fourth (1806–1807), the Fifth (1809), the Sixth (1813–1814), and the Seventh (1815) plus the Peninsular War (1807–1814) and the French invasion of Russia (1812).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Napoleon</span> Military leader and emperor of France (1769–1821)

Napoleon Bonaparte, later known by his regnal name Napoleon I, was a French military commander and political leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led successful campaigns during the Revolutionary Wars. He was the de facto leader of the French Republic as First Consul from 1799 to 1804, then Emperor of the French from 1804 until 1814 and again in 1815. Napoleon's political and cultural legacy endures to this day, as a highly celebrated and controversial leader. He initiated many liberal reforms that have persisted in society, and is considered one of the greatest military commanders in history. His wars and campaigns are studied by militaries all over the world. Between three and six million civilians and soldiers perished in what became known as the Napoleonic Wars.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Peninsular War</span> Part of the Napoleonic Wars (1807–1814)

The Peninsular War (1807–1814) was the military conflict fought in the Iberian Peninsula by Spain, Portugal, and the United Kingdom against the invading and occupying forces of the First French Empire during the Napoleonic Wars. In Spain, it is considered to overlap with the Spanish War of Independence. The war started when the French and Spanish armies invaded and occupied Portugal in 1807 by transiting through Spain, and it escalated in 1808 after Napoleonic France occupied Spain, which had been its ally. Napoleon Bonaparte forced the abdications of Ferdinand VII and his father Charles IV and then installed his brother Joseph Bonaparte on the Spanish throne and promulgated the Bayonne Constitution. Most Spaniards rejected French rule and fought a bloody war to oust them. The war on the peninsula lasted until the Sixth Coalition defeated Napoleon in 1814, and is regarded as one of the first wars of national liberation. It is also significant for the emergence of large-scale guerrilla warfare.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Continental System</span> 1806–1814 embargo of Napoleonic Europe against Britain

The Continental Blockade, or Continental System, was a large-scale embargo against British trade by Napoleon Bonaparte against the British Empire from 21 November 1806 until 11 April 1814, during the Napoleonic Wars. Napoleon issued the Berlin Decree on 21 November 1806 in response to the naval blockade of the French coasts enacted by the British government on 16 May 1806. The embargo was applied intermittently, ending on 11 April 1814 after Napoleon's first abdication.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Treaty of Kiel</span> 1814 treaty between the UK, Sweden, and Denmark–Norway

The Treaty of Kiel or Peace of Kiel was concluded between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Kingdom of Sweden on one side and the Kingdoms of Denmark and Norway on the other side on 14 January 1814 in Kiel. It ended the hostilities between the parties in the ongoing Napoleonic Wars, where the United Kingdom and Sweden were part of the anti-French camp while Denmark–Norway was allied to France.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">May Revolution</span> 1810 revolution in Buenos Aires

The May Revolution was a week-long series of events that took place from May 18 to 25, 1810, in Buenos Aires, capital of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata. This Spanish colony included roughly the territories of present-day Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, and parts of Brazil. The result was the removal of Viceroy Baltasar Hidalgo de Cisneros and the establishment of a local government, the Primera Junta, on May 25.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Primera Junta</span> First independent government of Argentina, established and disbanded in 1810

The Primera Junta or Junta Provisional Gubernativa de las Provincias del Río de la Plata, is the most common name given to the first government of what would eventually become Argentina. It was formed on 25 May 1810, as a result of the events of the May Revolution. The Junta initially only had representatives from Buenos Aires. When it was expanded, as expected, with the addition of representatives from the other cities of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata, it became popularly known instead as the Junta Grande or Junta Provisional Gubernativa de Buenos Aires. The Junta operated at El Fuerte, which had been used since 1776 as a residence by the viceroys.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">First Republic of Venezuela</span>

The First Republic of Venezuela was the first independent government of Venezuela, lasting from 5 July 1811, to 25 July 1812. The period of the First Republic began with the overthrow of the Spanish colonial authorities and the establishment of the Junta Suprema de Caracas on 19 April 1810, initiating the Venezuelan War of Independence, and ended with the surrender of the republican forces to the Spanish Captain Domingo de Monteverde. The congress of Venezuela declared the nation's independence on 5 July 1811, and later wrote a constitution for it. In doing so, Venezuela is notable for being the first Spanish American colony to declare its independence.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cortes of Cádiz</span> 1810–1814 revival of the traditional Spanish parliament (cortes)

The Cortes of Cádiz was a revival of the traditional cortes, which as an institution had not functioned for many years, but it met as a single body, rather than divided into estates as with previous ones.

In the Napoleonic era, junta was the name chosen by several local administrations formed in Spain during the Peninsular War as a patriotic alternative to the official administration toppled by the French invaders. The juntas were usually formed by adding prominent members of society, such as prelates, to the already-existing ayuntamientos. The juntas of the capitals of the traditional peninsular kingdoms of Spain styled themselves "Supreme Juntas", to differentiate themselves from, and claim authority over, provincial juntas. Juntas were also formed in Spanish America during this period in reaction to the developments in Spain.

The Supreme Central and Governing Junta of Spain and the Indies formally was the Spanish organ (junta) that accumulated the executive and legislative powers during the Napoleonic occupation of Spain. It was established on 25 September 1808 following the Spanish victory at the Battle of Bailén and after the Council of Castile declared null and void the abdications of Charles IV and Ferdinand VII at Bayonne earlier in May. It was active until 30 January 1810. It was initially formed by the representatives of the provincial juntas and first met in Aranjuez chaired by the Count of Floridablanca, with 35 members in total.

The May Revolution was a series of revolutionary political and social events that took place during the early nineteenth century in the city of Buenos Aires, capital of the Spanish Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata, a colony of the Spanish Crown which at the time contained the present-day nations of Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. The consequence of the revolution was that the Viceroy Baltasar Hidalgo de Cisneros, was force out from office, and role of government was assumed by the Primera Junta. There are many reasons, both local and international, that promoted such developments.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Historiography of the May Revolution</span>

Historiographical studies of the May Revolution started in the second half of the 19th century in Argentina and have extended to modern day. All historiographical perspectives agree in considering the May Revolution as the turning point that gave birth to the modern nation of Argentina, and that the Revolution was unavoidable in 1810. The main topics of disagreement between Argentine historians are the specific weight of the diverse causes of the May Revolution, who were the leaders of it among the different involved parties, whenever there was popular support for it or not, and whenever the loyalty to the captive Spanish king Ferdinand VII was real or an elaborate masquerade to conceal pro-independence purposes.

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