1813

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1813 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1813
MDCCCXIII
Ab urbe condita 2566
Armenian calendar 1262
ԹՎ ՌՄԿԲ
Assyrian calendar 6563
Balinese saka calendar 1734–1735
Bengali calendar 1220
Berber calendar 2763
British Regnal year 53  Geo. 3   54  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2357
Burmese calendar 1175
Byzantine calendar 7321–7322
Chinese calendar 壬申(Water  Monkey)
4509 or 4449
     to 
癸酉年 (Water  Rooster)
4510 or 4450
Coptic calendar 1529–1530
Discordian calendar 2979
Ethiopian calendar 1805–1806
Hebrew calendar 5573–5574
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1869–1870
 - Shaka Samvat 1734–1735
 - Kali Yuga 4913–4914
Holocene calendar 11813
Igbo calendar 813–814
Iranian calendar 1191–1192
Islamic calendar 1227–1229
Japanese calendar Bunka 10
(文化10年)
Javanese calendar 1739–1740
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4146
Minguo calendar 99 before ROC
民前99年
Nanakshahi calendar 345
Thai solar calendar 2355–2356
Tibetan calendar 阳水猴年
(male Water-Monkey)
1939 or 1558 or 786
     to 
阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
1940 or 1559 or 787
February 3: Battle of San Lorenzo San Lorenzo.jpg
February 3: Battle of San Lorenzo
June 21: Battle of Vitoria James Beadle - Battle of Vitoria, 21 June 1813 - 1913.jpg
June 21: Battle of Vitoria

1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1813th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 813th year of the 2nd millennium, the 13th year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1813, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

October 16 - 19: Battle of Leipzig Battle of Leipzig 11.jpg
October 16 19: Battle of Leipzig
October 26: Battle of the Chateauguay Battle of Chateauguay.jpg
October 26: Battle of the Chateauguay

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryJune

Soren Kierkegaard Kierkegaard.jpg
Søren Kierkegaard
Richard Wagner RichardWagner.jpg
Richard Wagner

JulyDecember

Giuseppe Verdi Giuseppe Verdi by Giovanni Boldini.jpg
Giuseppe Verdi
Georg Buchner Georg Buchner.png
Georg Büchner

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Joseph-Louis Lagrange Lagrange portrait.jpg
Joseph-Louis Lagrange
Benjamin Rush Benjamin Rush Painting by Peale.jpg
Benjamin Rush

JulyDecember

Tecumseh Tecumseh02.jpg
Tecumseh
Jozef Poniatowski Prince Joseph Poniatowski by Jozef Grassi.jpg
Józef Poniatowski

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1807 Calendar year

1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1807th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 807th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1807, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1810s Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1810s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1810, and ended on December 31, 1819.

1815 Calendar year

1815 (MDCCCXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1815th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 815th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1815, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1814 Calendar year

1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1814th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 814th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1814, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1812 Calendar year

1812 (MDCCCXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1812th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 812th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1812, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1806 Calendar year

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Napoleonic Wars 1803–1815 wars involving the French Empire

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European states formed into various coalitions. It produced a period of French domination over most of continental Europe. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon: the Third Coalition (1805), the Fourth (1806–07), the Fifth (1809), the Sixth (1813–14), and the Seventh (1815).

Peninsular War invasion of Spain and Portugal by France (1807–1814)

The Peninsular War (1807–1814) was the military conflict fought in the Iberian Peninsula by Spain, Portugal, and the United Kingdom against the invading and occupying forces of the First French Empire during the Napoleonic Wars. In Spain, it is considered to overlap with the Spanish War of Independence. The war began when the French and Spanish armies invaded and occupied Portugal in 1807 by transiting through Spain, and it escalated in 1808 after Napoleonic France had occupied Spain, which had been its ally. Napoleon Bonaparte forced the abdications of Ferdinand VII and his father Charles IV and then installed his brother Joseph Bonaparte on the Spanish throne and promulgated the Bayonne Constitution. Most Spaniards rejected French rule and fought a bloody war to oust them. The war on the peninsula lasted until the Sixth Coalition defeated Napoleon in 1814, and it is regarded as one of the first wars of national liberation and is significant for the emergence of large-scale guerrilla warfare.

Battle of Lützen (1813)

In the Battle of Lützen, Napoleon I of France halted the advances of the Sixth Coalition after the French invasion of Russia and the massive French losses in the campaign. The Russian commander, Prince Peter Wittgenstein, attempting to forestall Napoleon's capture of Leipzig, attacked the French right wing near Lützen, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. After a day of heavy fighting, the combined Prussian and Russian force retreated; due to French losses and a shortage of French cavalry, Napoleon was unable to conduct a pursuit.

Hundred Days War of the 7th Coalition, 20 March to 8 July 1815

The Hundred Days, also known as the War of the Seventh Coalition, marked the period between Napoleon's return from eleven months of exile on the island of Elba to Paris on 20 March 1815 and the second restoration of King Louis XVIII on 8 July 1815. This period saw the War of the Seventh Coalition, and includes the Waterloo Campaign, the Neapolitan War as well as several other minor campaigns. The phrase les Cent Jours was first used by the prefect of Paris, Gaspard, comte de Chabrol, in his speech welcoming the king back to Paris on 8 July.

Napoleonic era European history in the 1800s

The Napoleonic era is a period in the history of France and Europe. It is generally classified as including the fourth and final stage of the French Revolution, the first being the National Assembly, the second being the Legislative Assembly, and the third being the Directory. The Napoleonic era begins roughly with Napoleon Bonaparte's coup d'état, overthrowing the Directory, establishing the French Consulate, and ends during the Hundred Days and his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo. The Congress of Vienna soon set out to restore Europe to pre-French Revolution days. Napoleon brought political stability to a land torn by revolution and war. He made peace with the Roman Catholic Church and reversed the most radical religious policies of the Convention. In 1804 Napoleon promulgated the Civil Code, a revised body of civil law, which also helped stabilize French society. The Civil Code affirmed the political and legal equality of all adult men and established a merit-based society in which individuals advanced in education and employment because of talent rather than birth or social standing. The Civil Code confirmed many of the moderate revolutionary policies of the National Assembly but retracted measures passed by the more radical Convention. The code restored patriarchal authority in the family, for example, by making women and children subservient to male heads of households.

War of the Sixth Coalition 1813-14 conflict in Western Europe; part of the Napoleonic Wars

In the War of the Sixth Coalition, sometimes known in Germany as the War of Liberation, a coalition of Austria, Prussia, Russia, the United Kingdom, Portugal, Sweden, Spain and a number of German States defeated France and drove Napoleon into exile on Elba. After the disastrous French invasion of Russia of 1812 in which they had been forced to support France, Prussia and Austria joined Russia, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Portugal and the rebels in Spain who were already at war with France.

War of the Fourth Coalition Part of the Napoleonic Wars

The Fourth Coalition fought against Napoleon's French Empire and were defeated in a war spanning 1806–1807. The main coalition partners were Prussia and Russia with Saxony, Sweden, and Great Britain also contributing. Excluding Prussia, some members of the coalition had previously been fighting France as part of the Third Coalition, and there was no intervening period of general peace. On 9 October 1806, Prussia joined a renewed coalition, fearing the rise in French power after the defeat of Austria and establishment of the French-sponsored Confederation of the Rhine. Prussia and Russia mobilized for a fresh campaign with Prussia massing troops in Saxony.

Fort Meigs United States historic place

Fort Meigs was a United States fortification along the Maumee River in what is now Perrysburg, Ohio during the War of 1812. The British Army, supported by Tecumseh's Confederacy, failed to capture the fort during the siege of Fort Meigs. It is named in honor of Ohio governor Return J. Meigs Jr., for his support in providing General William Henry Harrison with militia and supplies for the line of forts along the Old Northwest frontier.

Battle of Möckern

The Battle of Möckern was a series of heavy clashes between allied Prusso-Russian troops and Napoleonic French forces south of Möckern. It occurred on 5 April 1813. It ended in a French defeat and formed the successful prelude to the "Liberation War" against Napoleon.

First French Empire 1804–1815 empire of Napoleon Bonaparte

The First French Empire, officially the French Empire, also known as Napoleonic France, was the empire ruled by Napoleon Bonaparte, who established French hegemony over much of continental Europe at the beginning of the 19th century. It lasted from 18 May 1804 to 11 April 1814 and again briefly from 20 March 1815 to 7 July 1815.,

Events from the year 1813 in the United States.

German campaign of 1813 Conflict between France and an alliance

The German campaign was fought in 1813. Members of the Sixth Coalition, including the German states of Austria and Prussia, plus Russia and Sweden, fought a series of battles in Germany against the French Emperor Napoleon, his marshals, and the armies of the Confederation of the Rhine - an alliance of most of the other German states - which ended the domination of the First French Empire.

Events from the year 1813 in Germany.

References

  1. Blackburn, Julia (1989). Charles Waterton, 1782-1865: traveller and conservationist. London: The Bodley Head. pp. 52–9. ISBN   0-370-31248-1.
  2. http://www.nj.gov/state/archives/docfranklin.html gives 13 November, http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/William_Franklin.aspx gives 16 November and http://www.geni.com/people/William-Franklin-Colonial-Governor-of-New-Jersey/6000000007529267271 gives 17 November.

Further reading