1815

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1815 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1815
MDCCCXV
Ab urbe condita 2568
Armenian calendar 1264
ԹՎ ՌՄԿԴ
Assyrian calendar 6565
Balinese saka calendar 1736–1737
Bengali calendar 1222
Berber calendar 2765
British Regnal year 55  Geo. 3   56  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2359
Burmese calendar 1177
Byzantine calendar 7323–7324
Chinese calendar 甲戌(Wood  Dog)
4511 or 4451
     to 
乙亥年 (Wood  Pig)
4512 or 4452
Coptic calendar 1531–1532
Discordian calendar 2981
Ethiopian calendar 1807–1808
Hebrew calendar 5575–5576
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1871–1872
 - Shaka Samvat 1736–1737
 - Kali Yuga 4915–4916
Holocene calendar 11815
Igbo calendar 815–816
Iranian calendar 1193–1194
Islamic calendar 1230–1231
Japanese calendar Bunka 12
(文化12年)
Javanese calendar 1741–1742
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4148
Minguo calendar 97 before ROC
民前97年
Nanakshahi calendar 347
Thai solar calendar 2357–2358
Tibetan calendar 阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1941 or 1560 or 788
     to 
阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
1942 or 1561 or 789
February 26: Napoleon Bonaparte escapes from Elba Beaume - Napoleon Ier quittant l'ile d'Elbe - 1836.jpg
February 26: Napoleon Bonaparte escapes from Elba

1815 (MDCCCXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1815th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 815th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1815, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

January

February

March

April

June 9: The Final Act of the Congress of Vienna is signed. Congress of Vienna.PNG
June 9: The Final Act of the Congress of Vienna is signed.

May

June

June 18: Battle of Waterloo Battle of Waterloo 1815.PNG
June 18: Battle of Waterloo

July

August

September

October

November

December

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryJune

Edward Clark Edward clark.png
Edward Clark

JulyDecember

Elizabeth Cady Stanton Elizabeth Stanton.jpg
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Ada Lovelace Ada Lovelace portrait.jpg
Ada Lovelace

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Emma, Lady Hamilton George Romney - Emma Hart in a Straw Hat.jpg
Emma, Lady Hamilton
Jose de Cordoba y Ramos Jose de Cordova y Ramos (Museo Naval de Madrid).jpg
José de Córdoba y Ramos
William Howe De Lancey William Howe DeLancey.jpg
William Howe De Lancey

JulyDecember

John Singleton Copley John Singleton Copley - John Singleton Copley Self-Portrait - Google Art Project.jpg
John Singleton Copley

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1806 Calendar year

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1803 Calendar year

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1805 Calendar year

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References

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  8. To a meeting of the Royal Society in Newcastle upon Tyne.
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