1816

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1816 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1816
MDCCCXVI
Ab urbe condita 2569
Armenian calendar 1265
ԹՎ ՌՄԿԵ
Assyrian calendar 6566
Balinese saka calendar 1737–1738
Bengali calendar 1223
Berber calendar 2766
British Regnal year 56  Geo. 3   57  Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar 2360
Burmese calendar 1178
Byzantine calendar 7324–7325
Chinese calendar 乙亥(Wood  Pig)
4512 or 4452
     to 
丙子年 (Fire  Rat)
4513 or 4453
Coptic calendar 1532–1533
Discordian calendar 2982
Ethiopian calendar 1808–1809
Hebrew calendar 5576–5577
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1872–1873
 - Shaka Samvat 1737–1738
 - Kali Yuga 4916–4917
Holocene calendar 11816
Igbo calendar 816–817
Iranian calendar 1194–1195
Islamic calendar 1231–1232
Japanese calendar Bunka 13
(文化13年)
Javanese calendar 1742–1744
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4149
Minguo calendar 96 before ROC
民前96年
Nanakshahi calendar 348
Thai solar calendar 2358–2359
Tibetan calendar 阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
1942 or 1561 or 789
     to 
阳火鼠年
(male Fire-Rat)
1943 or 1562 or 790
June 19: Battle of Seven Oaks The Fight at Seven Oaks.jpg
June 19: Battle of Seven Oaks

1816 ( MDCCCXVI ) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar , the 1816th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 816th year of the 2nd millennium , the 16th year of the 19th century , and the 7th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1816, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Monday is any year with 366 days that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are GF, such as the years 1912, 1940, 1968, 1996, 2024, 2052, 2080, and 2120 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2008, 2036, and 2064 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Common years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

Contents

This year was known as the Year Without a Summer , because of low temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere, possibly the result of the Mount Tambora volcanic eruption in Indonesia in 1815, causing severe global cooling, catastrophic in some locations. [1]

Year Without a Summer 1816, a volcanic winter event during the Little Ice Age

The year 1816 is known as the Year Without a Summer because of severe climate abnormalities that caused average global temperatures to decrease by 0.4–0.7 °C (0.7–1.3 °F). This resulted in major food shortages across the Northern Hemisphere.

Northern Hemisphere half of Earth that is north of the equator

The Northern Hemisphere is the half of Earth that is north of the Equator. For other planets in the Solar System, north is defined as being in the same celestial hemisphere relative to the invariable plane of the solar system as Earth's North Pole.

Mount Tambora stratovolcano of Indonesia

Mount Tambora, or Tomboro, is an active stratovolcano in the northern part of Sumbawa, one of the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia. Tambora is known for its major eruption in 1815. It was formed due to the active subduction zones beneath it, and before the eruption of 1815, it was more than 4,300 metres high, making it then one of the tallest peaks in the Indonesian archipelago.

Events

JanuaryMarch

December 25 is the 359th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. Six days remain until the end of the year.

1815 Year

1815 (MDCCCXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1815th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 815th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1815, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

January 6 is the sixth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 359 days remain until the end of the year.

AprilJune

March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 277 days remain until the end of the year.

April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 265 days remain until the end of the year.

Second Bank of the United States US National Register of Historic Places bank building

The Second Bank of the United States, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the second federally authorized Hamiltonian national bank in the United States during its 20-year charter from February 1816 to January 1836. The bank's formal name, according to section 9 of its charter as passed by Congress, was "The President, Directors, and Company, of the Bank of the United States."

JulySeptember

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

Lord Byron English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement

George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, known simply as Lord Byron, was a British poet, peer, politician, and leading figure in the Romantic movement. He is regarded as one of the greatest British poets and remains widely read and influential. Among his best-known works are the lengthy narrative poems Don Juan and Childe Harold's Pilgrimage; many of his shorter lyrics in Hebrew Melodies also became popular.

Mary Shelley English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was an English novelist who wrote the Gothic novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft.

OctoberDecember

October 21 is the 294th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 71 days remain until the end of the year.

Penang Free School

Penang Free School, located at Green Lane in George Town, Penang, Malaysia, is the oldest English-medium school in Southeast Asia. Founded in 1816 with it's pride and majestic achivements, it is notable for its academic achievements, leading to its inclusion in the Malaysian Ministry of Education's Cluster School and High Performance School systems.

October 25 is the 298th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 67 days remain until the end of the year.

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryJune

Charlotte Bronte CBRichmond.png
Charlotte Brontë

JulyDecember

Arthur de Gobineau Arthur de Gobineau.jpg
Arthur de Gobineau
Paul Reuter Paul Julius Reuter 1869.jpg
Paul Reuter
Werner von Siemens Ernst Werner von Siemens.jpg
Werner von Siemens

date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Maria I of Portugal Maria I, Queen of Portugal - Giuseppe Troni, atribuido (Turim, 1739-Lisboa, 1810) - Google Cultural Institute.jpg
Maria I of Portugal

JulyDecember

Francisco de Miranda Francisco de Miranda by Tovar y Tovar.jpg
Francisco de Miranda

Approximate date

Related Research Articles

1818 Year

1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1818th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 818th year of the 2nd millennium, the 18th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1818, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1828 Year

1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1828th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 828th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1828, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1788 Year

1788 (MDCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1788th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 788th year of the 2nd millennium, the 88th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1788, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1833 Year

1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1833rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 833rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1833, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1807 Year

1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1807th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 807th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1807, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1870th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 870th year of the 2nd millennium, the 70th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1870, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1752 Year

1752 (MDCCLII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1752nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 752nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1752, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the British Empire, it was the only year with 355 days, as 3–13 September were skipped when the Empire adopted the Gregorian calendar.

1823 Year

1823 (MDCCCXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1823rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 823rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 23rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1823, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 Year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 12 days until February 28, 1900.

1819 Year

1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1819th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 819th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1819, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1821 Year

1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1821st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 821st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1821, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1831 Year

1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1831st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 831st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1831, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1830 Year

1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1830th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 830th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1830, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. It is known in European history as a rather tumultuous year with the Revolutions of 1830 in France, Belgium, Poland, Switzerland and Italy.

1803 Year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1804 Year

1804 (MDCCCIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1804th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 804th year of the 2nd millennium, the 4th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1804, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1834 Year

1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1834th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 834th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1834, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1824 Year

1824 (MDCCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1824th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 824th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1824, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1817 Year

1817 (MDCCCXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1817th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 817th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1817, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1785 Year

1785 (MDCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1785th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 785th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1785, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. McNamara, Robert (March 24, 2018). "The Year Without a Summer Was a Bizarre Weather Disaster in 1816". ThoughtCo. Retrieved April 20, 2019.
  2. Who were Czars Alexander I and Alexander II of Russia?, toughissues.org (accessed 2013-12-13) Archived December 16, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  3. Thompson, Roy (2004). Thunder Underground: Northumberland mining disasters, 1815-1865. Ashbourne: Landmark. p. 121. ISBN   9781843061694 . Retrieved January 8, 2013.
  4. K. L. Pradhan, Thapa Politics in Nepal: With Special Reference to Bhim Sen Thapa, 1806-1839 (Concept Publishing, 2012) p110
  5. The Statesman's Manual: The Addresses and Messages of the Presidents of the United States, Inaugural, Annual, and Special, from 1789 to 1854 (E. Walker, 1849) p321
  6. Louis L. Bucciarelli and Nancy Dworsky, Sophie Germain: An Essay in the History of the Theory of Elasticity (Springer, 2012) p138
  7. Kenneth J. Hagan and Ian J. Bickerton, Unintended Consequences: The United States at War (Reaktion Books, 2007) p48
  8. French official law repository
  9. Andrew J. Counter, The Amorous Restoration: Love, Sex, and Politics in Early Nineteenth-Century France (Oxford University Press, 2016) p47
  10. Martin Ceadel, The Origins of War Prevention: The British Peace Movement and International Relations, 1730-1854 (Clarendon Press, 1996) p222
  11. Roger Steer, Good News for the World: 200 Years of Making the Bible Heard : the Story of Bible Society (Monarch Books, 2004) p155
  12. Darrin M. McMahon, Enemies of the Enlightenment: The French Counter-Enlightenment and the Making of Modernity (Oxford University Press, 2002) p157
  13. "Excmo. Sr. Don Pelagio Antonio de Labastida y Dávalos (1855-1863)" (in Spanish). Arquidiocesis de Puebla. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  14. "Charlotte Brontë | British author". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved April 17, 2019.