1823 English cricket season

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1823 English cricket season
1822
1824

1823 was the 37th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Henry Bentley issued his Correct Account of all Matches, 1786–1822.

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

Marylebone Cricket Club english Cricket Club

Marylebone Cricket Club is a cricket club founded in 1787 and based since 1814 at Lord's cricket ground, which it owns, in St John's Wood, London, England. The club was formerly the governing body of cricket in England and Wales and, as the sport's legislator, held considerable global influence.

Henry Bentley was an English first-class cricketer who played for Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), Middlesex and Hampshire in 68 matches from 1798 to 1822.

Contents

Honours

William Ward (cricketer, born 1787) English financier, and noted cricketer

William Ward (1787–1849) was an English financier, and noted cricketer.

William Ashby was an English cricketer in the 19th century. He was born at Linton, Kent and played mainly for Kent teams. He was an outstanding slow bowler, probably underarm but he may have bowled roundarm in the later years of his career.

Events

Herefordshire County of England

Herefordshire is a county in the West Midlands of England, governed by Herefordshire Council. It borders Shropshire to the north, Worcestershire to the east, Gloucestershire to the south-east, and the Welsh counties of Monmouthshire and Powys to the west.

In the sport of cricket, the wicket is one of the two sets of three stumps and two bails at either end of the pitch. The wicket is guarded by a batsman who, with his bat, attempts to prevent the ball from hitting the wicket. The origin of the word is from wicket gate, a small gate. Historically, cricket wickets had only two stumps and one bail and looked like a gate. The third (middle) stump was introduced in 1775.

First-class cricket is an official classification of the highest-standard international or domestic matches in the sport of cricket. A first-class match is of three or more days' scheduled duration between two sides of eleven players each and is officially adjudged to be worthy of the status by virtue of the standard of the competing teams. Matches must allow for the teams to play two innings each although, in practice, a team might play only one innings or none at all.

First mentions

Counties

Clubs and teams

Players

John Beagley was an English professional cricketer who played first-class cricket from 1823 to 1826. He was mainly associated with Hampshire and made 6 known appearances in first-class matches.

James Dale was an English professional cricketer who played first-class cricket from 1823 to 1827. He was mainly associated with Sussex and made 9 known appearances in first-class matches.

Venues

Related Research Articles

1801 was the 15th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The famous batsman William Lambert made his debut in important matches.

1803 was the 17th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Thomas Howard made his debut in important matches.

1804 was the 18th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The first Eton v Harrow match may have been played at Lord's Old Ground.

1805 was the 19th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Lord Frederick Beauclerk became the first batsman known to have scored two centuries in the same season.

1806 was the 20th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The first two Gentlemen v Players matches took place but the fixture was not revived until 1819.

1807 was the 21st season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). John Willes of Kent first tried to revive the idea of "straight-armed" bowling, which had originated with Tom Walker in the 1790s.

1808 was the 22nd season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). George Osbaldeston made his debut in important matches.

1810 was the 24th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). William Ward made his debut in important matches and The Bs were dismissed for a total of only 6.

1817 was the 31st season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Cricket was hit by a controversial match-fixing scandal.

1819 was the 33rd season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The Gentlemen v Players match, previously played in 1806 only, was resurrected.

1822 was the 36th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). John Willes brought the roundarm issue to a head and sacrificed his own career in the process. The outstanding batsman James Saunders made his known first-class debut.

1825 was the 39th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The pavilion at Lord's was destroyed by fire. Many irreplaceable documents which recorded early cricket matches are believed to have been lost. The impact of this upon cricket's history is that it is only since 1825 that surviving records can be viewed with anything like complete confidence. Inter-county matches are recorded for the first time since 1796. Two of the greatest players of the 19th century, William Lillywhite and Ned Wenman, made their first known appearances in important matches.

1818 was the 32nd season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). George Osbaldeston lost his MCC membership.

1821 was the 35th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The Gentlemen v Players match was ended in controversial circumstances.

1824 was the 38th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Gentlemen v Players was an odds game with 14 on the Gentlemen team, but the Players still won by 103 runs.

1816 was the 30th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Manchester Cricket Club was founded and became the forerunner of Lancashire County Cricket Club.

1811 was the 25th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Lord's Middle Ground came into use for important matches.

1814 was the 28th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The current Lord's was opened and staged its first match. Jem Broadbridge made his debut in important matches.

1815 was the 29th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). A discernible recovery began as the Napoleonic Wars ended.

References

  1. 1 2 Note that scorecards created in the first quarter of the 19th century are not necessarily accurate or complete; therefore any summary of runs, wickets or catches can only represent the known totals and computation of averages is ineffectual.
  2. 1 2 3 Bowen, p.270.
  3. Haygarth, p.470.
  4. Haygarth, p.473.
  5. Haygarth, p.474.
  6. Haygarth, p.476.
  7. Haygarth, p.479.
  8. Haygarth, p.480.
  9. Haygarth, p.484.

Bibliography

Arthur Haygarth was a noted amateur cricketer who became one of cricket's most significant historians. He played first-class cricket for the Marylebone Cricket Club and Sussex between 1844 and 1861, as well as numerous other invitational and representative teams including an England XI and a pre-county Middlesex. A right-handed bat, Haygarth played 136 games now regarded as first-class, scoring 3,042 runs and taking 19 wickets with his part-time bowling. He was educated at Harrow, which had established a rich tradition as a proving ground for cricketers. He served on many MCC committees and was elected a life member in 1864.

Further reading