1836

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1836 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1836
MDCCCXXXVI
Ab urbe condita 2589
Armenian calendar 1285
ԹՎ ՌՄՁԵ
Assyrian calendar 6586
Balinese saka calendar 1757–1758
Bengali calendar 1243
Berber calendar 2786
British Regnal year 6  Will. 4   7  Will. 4
Buddhist calendar 2380
Burmese calendar 1198
Byzantine calendar 7344–7345
Chinese calendar 乙未年 (Wood  Goat)
4532 or 4472
     to 
丙申年 (Fire  Monkey)
4533 or 4473
Coptic calendar 1552–1553
Discordian calendar 3002
Ethiopian calendar 1828–1829
Hebrew calendar 5596–5597
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1892–1893
 - Shaka Samvat 1757–1758
 - Kali Yuga 4936–4937
Holocene calendar 11836
Igbo calendar 836–837
Iranian calendar 1214–1215
Islamic calendar 1251–1252
Japanese calendar Tenpō 7
(天保7年)
Javanese calendar 1763–1764
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4169
Minguo calendar 76 before ROC
民前76年
Nanakshahi calendar 368
Thai solar calendar 2378–2379
Tibetan calendar 阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
1962 or 1581 or 809
     to 
阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1963 or 1582 or 810
March 2: Independence of Texas. Flag of Texas.svg
March 2: Independence of Texas.

1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1836th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 836th year of the 2nd millennium, the 36th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1836, the Gregorian calendar was 12days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

January–March

March 6: Battle of the Alamo Alamo.jpg
March 6: Battle of the Alamo

April–June

April 21: Battle of San Jacinto Sam Houston at San Jacinto.jpg
April 21: Battle of San Jacinto

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Births

January–June

Ramakrishna Ramakrishna.jpg
Ramakrishna
Isabella Beeton Isabella Mary Beeton.jpg
Isabella Beeton

July–December

Joseph Chamberlain Joseph Chamberlain.jpg
Joseph Chamberlain
Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt from American Women, 1897 - cropped.jpg
Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt
Benjamin Harris Babbidge Benjamin Harris Babbidge.jpg
Benjamin Harris Babbidge
W. S. Gilbert William S. Gilbert (1878).jpg
W. S. Gilbert

Deaths

January–June

Davy Crockett David Crockett.jpg
Davy Crockett
Andre-Marie Ampere Ampere Andre 1825.jpg
André-Marie Ampère
James Madison James Madison(cropped)(c).jpg
James Madison

July–December

Charles X of France Charles X Roi de France et de Navarre.jpg
Charles X of France

1836 serves as the start date for the grand strategy video games Victoria: An Empire Under the Sun, Victoria II, and Victoria 3 by Paradox Development Studio. [10] [11]

Related Research Articles

1791 Calendar year

1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1791st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 791st year of the 2nd millennium, the 91st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1791, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1826 Calendar year

1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1826th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 826th year of the 2nd millennium, the 26th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1826, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1876th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 876th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1876, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1854th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 854th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1854, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1830s Decade

The 1830s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1830, and ended on December 31, 1839.

1794 Calendar year

1794 (MDCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1794th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 794th year of the 2nd millennium, the 94th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1794, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1837 Calendar year

1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1837th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 837th year of the 2nd millennium, the 37th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1837, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1851st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 851st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1851, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1827 Calendar year

1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1827th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 827th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1827, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1846 Calendar year

1846 (MDCCCXLVI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1846th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 846th year of the 2nd millennium, the 46th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1840s decade. As of the start of 1846, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1830 Calendar year

1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1830th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 830th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1830, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1775 Calendar year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Flag of Texas Official flag of the U.S. state of Texas

The flag of Texas is the official flag of the U.S. state of Texas. It is well known for its prominent single white star which gives the flag its commonly-used name: "Lone Star Flag". This lone star, in turn, gives rise to the state's nickname: "The Lone Star State". The flag, flown at homes and businesses statewide, is highly popular among Texans and is treated with a great degree of reverence and esteem within Texas. Along with the flag of Hawaii, it is one of two state flags to have previously served as a national flag. In 2001, the North American Vexillological Association surveyed its members on the designs of the 72 U.S. state, territorial, and Canadian provincial flags and ranked the Texas flag second, behind New Mexico.

James Fannin American soldier and leader during the Texas Revolution

James Walker Fannin Jr. was an American military figure and slave trader in the Texas Army and leader during the Texas Revolution (1835-1836). After being outnumbered and surrendering to Mexican forces at the Battle of Coleto Creek, Colonel Fannin and nearly all his 344 men were executed soon afterward at Goliad, Texas, under Santa Anna's orders for all rebels to be executed.

Events from the year 1836 in the United States of America. Exceptionally, this page covers not only the history of the United States of America, but also that of the Republic of Texas in 1836.

1776 Calendar year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Jose Enrique de la Peña (1807-1840) was a colonel in the Mexican Army. Under General Antonio López de Santa Anna, de la Peña participated in the Battle of the Alamo.

Texian Army Army that fought for the independence of what became the Republic of Texas

The Texian Army, also known as the Revolutionary Army and Army of the People, was the land warfare branch of the Texian armed forces during the Texas Revolution. It spontaneously formed from the Texian Militia in October 1835 following the Battle of Gonzales. Along with the Texian Navy, it helped the Republic of Texas win independence from the Centralist Republic of Mexico on May 14, 1836 at the Treaties of Velasco. Although the Texas Army was officially established by the Consultation of the Republic of Texas on November 13, 1835, it did not replace the Texian Army until after the Battle of San Jacinto.

Presidio La Bahía United States historic place

The Presidio Nuestra Señora de Loreto de la Bahía, known more commonly as Presidio La Bahía, or simply La Bahía is a fort constructed by the Spanish Army that became the nucleus of the modern-day city of Goliad, Texas, United States. The current location dates to 1747.

Mathew Caldwell Texas settler

Matthew Caldwell,, also spelled Mathew Caldwell was a 19th-century Texas settler, military figure, Captain of the Gonzales – Seguin Rangers and a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence. Because of his recruitment ride ahead of the Battle of Gonzales, some call him the Paul Revere of Texas.

References

  1. Thomas, R. H. G. (1972). London's First Railway – The London & Greenwich. London: Batsford. ISBN   0-7134-0468-X.
  2. "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p76
  3. Texas Declaration of Independence  via Wikisource.
  4. The World Book Encyclopedia. 1970. (U.S.A.) Library of Congress catalog card number 70-79247.
  5. "The Constitution of the Republic of Texas (1836)". University of Texas School of Law. Archived from the original on January 8, 2013. Retrieved December 9, 2012.
  6. s:1836 (33) Registration of Births &c. A bill for registering Births Deaths and Marriages in England.
  7. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 260–261. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  8. "Railroad — Wilmington & Raleigh (later Weldon)". North Carolina Business History. CommunicationSolutions/ISI. 2006. Retrieved April 5, 2012.
  9. Mattusch, Carol C. (1988). Greek Bronze Statuary: from the beginnings through the fifth century B.C. . Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press. p.  3. ISBN   0801421489 . Retrieved August 22, 2016.
  10. "Victoria 3 Officially Announced A Decade After Previous Game". GameSpot. Retrieved April 21, 2022.
  11. "Victoria 2". Paradox Interactive Forums. Retrieved April 21, 2022.

Further reading