1850

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1850 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1850
MDCCCL
Ab urbe condita 2603
Armenian calendar 1299
ԹՎ ՌՄՂԹ
Assyrian calendar 6600
Bahá'í calendar 6–7
Balinese saka calendar 1771–1772
Bengali calendar 1257
Berber calendar 2800
British Regnal year 13  Vict. 1   14  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2394
Burmese calendar 1212
Byzantine calendar 7358–7359
Chinese calendar 己酉(Earth  Rooster)
4546 or 4486
     to 
庚戌年 (Metal  Dog)
4547 or 4487
Coptic calendar 1566–1567
Discordian calendar 3016
Ethiopian calendar 1842–1843
Hebrew calendar 5610–5611
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1906–1907
 - Shaka Samvat 1771–1772
 - Kali Yuga 4950–4951
Holocene calendar 11850
Igbo calendar 850–851
Iranian calendar 1228–1229
Islamic calendar 1266–1267
Japanese calendar Kaei 3
(嘉永3年)
Javanese calendar 1778–1779
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4183
Minguo calendar 62 before ROC
民前62年
Nanakshahi calendar 382
Thai solar calendar 2392–2393
Tibetan calendar 阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
1976 or 1595 or 823
     to 
阳金狗年
(male Iron-Dog)
1977 or 1596 or 824

1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1850th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 850th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1850, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryFebruary

Sofia Kovalevskaya Sofja Wassiljewna Kowalewskaja 1.jpg
Sofia Kovalevskaya
Mary Noailles Murfree Mary-noailles-murfree-in-payne1.jpg
Mary Noailles Murfree
Mihai Eminescu Eminescu.jpg
Mihai Eminescu

MarchApril

Fanny Davenport Fanny-Davenport-1905.jpg
Fanny Davenport
Hans von Pechmann Hans von Pechmann.jpg
Hans von Pechmann

MayJune

Alice Moore McComas ALICE MOORE McCOMAS A woman of the century (page 494 crop).jpg
Alice Moore McComas
Karl Ferdinand Braun Ferdinand Braun.jpg
Karl Ferdinand Braun

JulyAugust

Rose Hartwick Thorpe Rose Hartwick Thorpe from American Women, 1897.jpg
Rose Hartwick Thorpe

SeptemberOctober

Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis Stevenson Knox Series.jpg
Robert Louis Stevenson

NovemberDecember

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryMarch

Daoguang Emperor Qing Yi Ming  <<Qing Xuan Zong Dao Guang Huang Di Zhao Fu Xiang >> .jpg
Daoguang Emperor

AprilJune

William Wordsworth Wordsworth on Helvellyn by Benjamin Robert Haydon.jpg
William Wordsworth
Marie Tussaud Madame Tussaud, age 42.jpg
Marie Tussaud

JulySeptember

Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge Adolphus Frederick duke of Cambridge.jpg
Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge
Jose de San Martin Retrato mas canonico de Jose de San Martin.jpg
José de San Martín
Honore de Balzac Honore de Balzac (1842).jpg
Honoré de Balzac
Louis Philippe I 1841 portrait painting of Louis Philippe I (King of the French) by Winterhalter.jpg
Louis Philippe I

OctoberDecember

Sarah Biffen Sarah Biffen self portrait.jpg
Sarah Biffen

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1770s Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1770s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1770, and ended on December 31, 1779. A period full of discoveries, breakthroughs happened in all walks of life, as what emerged at this period brought life to most innovations we know today.

1780s

The 1780s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1780, and ended on December 31, 1789. A period widely considered as transitional between the Age of Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution, the 1780s saw the inception of modern philosophy. With the rise on astronomical, technological, and political discoveries and innovations such as Uranus, cast iron on structures, republicanism and hot air balloons, the 1780s kick-started a rapid global industrialization movement, leaving behind the world's predominantly agrarian customs in the past.

1809 Calendar year

1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1809th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 809th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1809, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1797 Calendar year

1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1797th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 797th year of the 2nd millennium, the 97th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1797, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1857 (MDCCCLVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1857th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 857th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1857, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1854th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 854th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1854, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1894th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 894th year of the 2nd millennium, the 94th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1894, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1886th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 886th year of the 2nd millennium, the 86th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1886, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1800 Calendar year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1819 Calendar year

1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1819th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 819th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1819, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1851st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 851st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1851, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1803 Calendar year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1856 (MDCCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1856th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 856th year of the 2nd millennium, the 56th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1856, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1795 Calendar year

1795 (MDCCXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1795th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 795th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1795, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1778 Calendar year

1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1778th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 778th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1778, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1777 Calendar year

1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1777th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 777th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1777, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1775 Calendar year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1776 Calendar year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1909th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 909th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1909, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. "Sacramento; an illustrated history: 1839 to 1874, from Sutter's Fort to Capital City". Archive.org. 1973.
  2. "University of Rochester History: Chapter 3, The Year of Decisions: 1850". rbscp.lib.rochester.edu.
  3. Shearman, Montague (1887). Athletics and Football. London: Longman.
  4. "Persia, Arabia, etc". World Digital Library . 1852. Retrieved July 27, 2013.
  5. "The Historic Pacific Highway from Vancouver to Castle Rock". pacific-hwy.net.
  6. Ross, David (2002). Ireland: History of a Nation (New ed.). New Lanark: Geddes & Grosset. p.  313. ISBN   1842051644.
  7. Clive Wake (1974). The Novels of Pierre Loti. Mouton. p. 15. ISBN   978-90-279-2660-9.
  8. Ion Creangă; Mihai Eminescu (1991). Selected Works of Ion Creangǎ and Mihai Eminescu. East European Monographs. p. ix. ISBN   978-973-21-0270-1.
  9. Walter Yust (1954). Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica. p. 18.
  10. Emily Toth; Per Seyersted (October 22, 1998). Kate Chopin's Private Papers. Indiana University Press. p. 1. ISBN   0-253-11593-0.
  11. Radio Liberty Research Bulletin. Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 1985. p. 7.
  12. Helen Darbishire (1964). Wordsworth. Longmans, Green & Company. p. 6.
  13. Derrik Mercer (February 1993). Chronicle of the Royal Family. Chronicle Communications. p. 410. ISBN   978-1-872031-20-0.
  14. "Robert Stevenson (1772-1850)". National Records of Scotland. May 31, 2013. Retrieved February 13, 2021.
  15. Hugh Chisholm; James Louis Garvin (1926). The Encyclopædia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature & General Information. 13th Ed., Being Volumes One to Twenty-eight of the Latest Standard Edition with the Three New Volumes Covering Recent Years and the Index Volume. Encyclopædia Britannica Company, Limited. p. 321.
  16. John Canning (1983). 100 Great Nineteenth-century Lives. Methuen. p. 239. ISBN   978-0-413-51520-9.
  17. Karl Marx (1974). Political Writings: Surveys from exile. Vintage Books. p. 138. ISBN   978-0-394-72003-6.