1856

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1856 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1856
MDCCCLVI
Ab urbe condita 2609
Armenian calendar 1305
ԹՎ ՌՅԵ
Assyrian calendar 6606
Baháʼí calendar 12–13
Balinese saka calendar 1777–1778
Bengali calendar 1263
Berber calendar 2806
British Regnal year 19  Vict. 1   20  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2400
Burmese calendar 1218
Byzantine calendar 7364–7365
Chinese calendar 乙卯年 (Wood  Rabbit)
4553 or 4346
     to 
丙辰年 (Fire  Dragon)
4554 or 4347
Coptic calendar 1572–1573
Discordian calendar 3022
Ethiopian calendar 1848–1849
Hebrew calendar 5616–5617
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1912–1913
 - Shaka Samvat 1777–1778
 - Kali Yuga 4956–4957
Holocene calendar 11856
Igbo calendar 856–857
Iranian calendar 1234–1235
Islamic calendar 1272–1273
Japanese calendar Ansei 3
(安政3年)
Javanese calendar 1784–1785
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4189
Minguo calendar 56 before ROC
民前56年
Nanakshahi calendar 388
Thai solar calendar 2398–2399
Tibetan calendar 阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
1982 or 1601 or 829
     to 
阳火龙年
(male Fire-Dragon)
1983 or 1602 or 830
March 30: Treaty of Paris (1856) Edouard Dubufe Congres de Paris.jpg
March 30: Treaty of Paris (1856)
May 22: Charles Sumner is caned on the floor of the Senate Southern Chivalry.jpg
May 22: Charles Sumner is caned on the floor of the Senate

1856 (MDCCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1856th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 856th year of the 2nd millennium, the 56th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1856, the Gregorian calendar was 12days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

January–March

March 5: Covent Garden Theatre fire. Covent Garden Theatre 1827-28.jpg
March 5: Covent Garden Theatre fire.

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Births

January–March

Henri Philippe Petain Philippe Petain (en civil, autour de 1930).jpg
Henri Philippe Pétain
Elizabeth Marney Conner ELIZABETH MARNEY CONNER.jpg
Elizabeth Marney Conner

April–June

July–September

Nikola Tesla Tesla circa 1890.jpeg
Nikola Tesla
Alfred Deakin Alfred Deakin crop.jpg
Alfred Deakin
Kate Douglas Wiggin Kate Douglas Wiggin 01.jpg
Kate Douglas Wiggin
George McClellan George McClellan (Chatham).jpg
George McClellan
Theobald von Bethmann Hollweg Theobald von Bethmann Hollweg(cropped).jpg
Theobald von Bethmann Hollweg
J. J. Thomson J.J Thomson.jpg
J. J. Thomson
Woodrow Wilson President Woodrow Wilson portrait December 2 1912.jpg
Woodrow Wilson

October–December

Date unknown

Deaths

January–June

Heinrich Heine Heinrich Heine.PNG
Heinrich Heine

July–December

Amedeo Avogadro Avogadro Amedeo.jpg
Amedeo Avogadro
Robert Schumann Schumann-photo1850.jpg
Robert Schumann

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1866</span> Calendar year

1866 (MDCCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1866th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 866th year of the 2nd millennium, the 66th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1866, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1861st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 861st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1861, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1770s</span> Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1770s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1770, and ended on December 31, 1779. A period full of discoveries, breakthroughs happened in all walks of life, as what emerged at this period brought life to most innovations we know today.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1782</span> Calendar year

1782 (MDCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1782nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 782nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 82nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1782, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1796</span> Calendar year

1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1796th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 796th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1796, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1854th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 854th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1854, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1884</span> Calendar year

1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1884th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 884th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1884, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1886th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 886th year of the 2nd millennium, the 86th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1886, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1774</span> Calendar year

1774 (MDCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1774th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 774th year of the 2nd millennium, the 74th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1774, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1852 (MDCCCLII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1852nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 852nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1852, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1800</span> Calendar year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1806</span> Calendar year

1806 (MDCCCVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1806th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 806th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1806, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1850</span> Calendar year

1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1850th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 850th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1850, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1851st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 851st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1851, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1853 (MDCCCLIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1853rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 853rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 53rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1853, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1805</span> Calendar year

1805 (MDCCCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1805th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 805th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1805, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1798</span> Calendar year

1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1798th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 798th year of the 2nd millennium, the 98th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1798, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1778</span> Calendar year

1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1778th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 778th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1778, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1775</span> Calendar year

1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1775th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 775th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1775, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1776</span> Calendar year

1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1776th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 776th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1770s decade. As of the start of 1776, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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