1860

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1860 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1860
MDCCCLX
Ab urbe condita 2613
Armenian calendar 1309
ԹՎ ՌՅԹ
Assyrian calendar 6610
Baháʼí calendar 16–17
Balinese saka calendar 1781–1782
Bengali calendar 1267
Berber calendar 2810
British Regnal year 23  Vict. 1   24  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2404
Burmese calendar 1222
Byzantine calendar 7368–7369
Chinese calendar 己未年 (Earth  Goat)
4556 or 4496
     to 
庚申年 (Metal  Monkey)
4557 or 4497
Coptic calendar 1576–1577
Discordian calendar 3026
Ethiopian calendar 1852–1853
Hebrew calendar 5620–5621
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1916–1917
 - Shaka Samvat 1781–1782
 - Kali Yuga 4960–4961
Holocene calendar 11860
Igbo calendar 860–861
Iranian calendar 1238–1239
Islamic calendar 1276–1277
Japanese calendar Ansei 7 / Man'en 1
(万延元年)
Javanese calendar 1788–1789
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4193
Minguo calendar 52 before ROC
民前52年
Nanakshahi calendar 392
Thai solar calendar 2402–2403
Tibetan calendar 阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1986 or 1605 or 833
     to 
阳金猴年
(male Iron-Monkey)
1987 or 1606 or 834

1860 (MDCCCLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1860th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 860th year of the 2nd millennium, the 60th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1860, the Gregorian calendar was 12days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Political map of the world in 1860 1859-60 CE world map.PNG
Political map of the world in 1860

Events

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

December 29: HMS Warrior (restored). Hms warrior.jpg
December 29: HMS Warrior (restored).

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryMarch

Takaaki Kato Takaaki Kato suit.jpg
Takaaki Kato
Charles Curtis Charles Curtis-portrait.jpg
Charles Curtis

AprilJune

JulySeptember

Lizzie Borden Lizzie borden.jpg
Lizzie Borden
Annie Oakley Annie Oakley by Baker's Art Gallery c1880s-crop.jpg
Annie Oakley
Joseph Cook Joseph Cook - Crown Studios 03.jpg
Joseph Cook
Georgina Fraser Newhall Georgina Fraser Newhall (1895).png
Georgina Fraser Newhall

OctoberDecember



Deaths

JanuaryJune

Anne Isabella Milbanke Annabella Byron (1792-1860).jpg
Anne Isabella Milbanke

JulyDecember

Charles Goodyear Southworth and Hawes - Charles Goodyear (Zeno Fotografie) crop.png
Charles Goodyear
Arthur Schopenhauer Schopenhauer 1852.jpg
Arthur Schopenhauer

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1917th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 917th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1917, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1949th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 949th year of the 2nd millennium, the 49th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1940s decade.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1941st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 941st year of the 2nd millennium, the 41st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1940s decade.

1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1859th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 859th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1859, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1906th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 906th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1906, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1936th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 936th year of the 2nd millennium, the 36th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1930s decade.

1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1861st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 861st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1861, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1937th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 937th year of the 2nd millennium, the 37th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1930s decade.

1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1940th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 940th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1940s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1871</span> Calendar year

1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1871st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 871st year of the 2nd millennium, the 71st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1871, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1882</span> Calendar year

1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1882nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 882nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 82nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1882, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1867th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 867th year of the 2nd millennium, the 67th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1867, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1933rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 933rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1930s decade.

1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1858th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 858th year of the 2nd millennium, the 58th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1858, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Unification of Italy</span> 1848–1871 consolidation of Italian states

The unification of Italy, also known as the Risorgimento, was the 19th-century political and social movement that resulted in the consolidation of different states of the Italian Peninsula into a single state in 1861, the Kingdom of Italy. Inspired by the rebellions in the 1820s and 1830s against the outcome of the Congress of Vienna, the unification process was precipitated by the Revolutions of 1848, and reached completion in 1871 after the Capture of Rome and its designation as the capital of the Kingdom of Italy.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Francis II of the Two Sicilies</span> King of the Two Sicilies (1836–1894)

Francis II was King of the Two Sicilies from 1859 to 1861. He was the last King of the Two Sicilies, as successive invasions by Giuseppe Garibaldi and Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia ultimately brought an end to his rule, as part of Italian unification. After he was deposed, the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies and the Kingdom of Sardinia were merged into the newly formed Kingdom of Italy.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Expedition of the Thousand</span> Event of the Italian Risorgimento which took place in 1860

The Expedition of the Thousand was an event of the Italian Risorgimento that took place in 1860. A corps of volunteers led by Giuseppe Garibaldi sailed from Quarto, near Genoa and landed in Marsala, Sicily, in order to conquer the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, ruled by the House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies.

1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1950th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 950th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1950s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Giuseppe Garibaldi</span> Italian general, patriot, and republican (1807–1882)

Giuseppe Maria Garibaldi was an Italian general, patriot, revolutionary and republican. He contributed to Italian unification and the creation of the Kingdom of Italy. He is considered one of the greatest generals of modern times and one of Italy's "fathers of the fatherland", along with Camillo Benso, Count of Cavour, Victor Emmanuel II of Italy and Giuseppe Mazzini. Garibaldi is also known as the "Hero of the Two Worlds" because of his military enterprises in South America and Europe.

References

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