1862

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1862 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1862
MDCCCLXII
Ab urbe condita 2615
Armenian calendar 1311
ԹՎ ՌՅԺԱ
Assyrian calendar 6612
Bahá'í calendar 18–19
Balinese saka calendar 1783–1784
Bengali calendar 1269
Berber calendar 2812
British Regnal year 25  Vict. 1   26  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2406
Burmese calendar 1224
Byzantine calendar 7370–7371
Chinese calendar 辛酉(Metal  Rooster)
4558 or 4498
     to 
壬戌年 (Water  Dog)
4559 or 4499
Coptic calendar 1578–1579
Discordian calendar 3028
Ethiopian calendar 1854–1855
Hebrew calendar 5622–5623
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1918–1919
 - Shaka Samvat 1783–1784
 - Kali Yuga 4962–4963
Holocene calendar 11862
Igbo calendar 862–863
Iranian calendar 1240–1241
Islamic calendar 1278–1279
Japanese calendar Bunkyū 2
(文久2年)
Javanese calendar 1790–1791
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4195
Minguo calendar 50 before ROC
民前50年
Nanakshahi calendar 394
Thai solar calendar 2404–2405
Tibetan calendar 阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1988 or 1607 or 835
     to 
阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
1989 or 1608 or 836

1862 (MDCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1862nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 862nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1862, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 30: USS Monitor. USSMonitor1862.2.ws.jpg
January 30: USS Monitor.
February 6: Battle of Fort Henry. Battle of Fort Henry 1862.jpg
February 6: Battle of Fort Henry.

AprilJune

JulySeptember

Diagram of US Federal Government and American Union. Published: 1862, July 15. Diagram of the Federal Government and American Union edit.jpg
Diagram of US Federal Government and American Union. Published: 1862, July 15.

OctoberDecember

December 13: Battle of Fredericksburg. Battle of Fredericksburg, Dec 13, 1862.png
December 13: Battle of Fredericksburg.
Dec. 30: Monitor sinks. USS Monitor - H58758.jpg
Dec. 30: Monitor sinks.
American Civil War in 1862 Map of American Civil War in 1862.svg
American Civil War in 1862

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryMarch

David Hilbert Hilbert.jpg
David Hilbert
Edith Wharton Edith Wharton by Edward Harrison May.jpg
Edith Wharton

AprilJune

JulySeptember

Gustav Klimt Klimt.jpg
Gustav Klimt
Claude Debussy Claude Debussy ca 1908, foto av Felix Nadar.jpg
Claude Debussy
Ida B. Wells Mary Garrity - Ida B. Wells-Barnett - Google Art Project - restoration crop.jpg
Ida B. Wells
Andrew Fisher Andrewfisher2.JPG
Andrew Fisher
Billy Hughes Billy Hughes 1919.jpg
Billy Hughes

OctoberDecember

Gerhart Hauptmann Gerhart Hauptmann nobel.jpg
Gerhart Hauptmann

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Samuel Colt Samuel Colt engraving by John Chester Buttre, c1855.jpg
Samuel Colt
John Tyler John Tyler Photographic Portrait Extracted.png
John Tyler

JulyDecember

Judith Montefiore Lady Judith Montefiore.jpg
Judith Montefiore
Martin Van Buren Martin Van Buren by Mathew Brady c1855-58.jpg
Martin Van Buren

Related Research Articles

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Louisiana in the American Civil War involvement of the Confederate state of Louisiana in the American Civil War

Louisiana was a dominant population center in the southwest of the Confederate States of America, controlling the wealthy trade center of New Orleans, and contributing the French Creole and Cajun populations to the demographic composition of a predominantly Anglo-American country. In the antebellum period, Louisiana was a slave state, where enslaved African Americans had comprised the majority of the population during the eighteenth-century French and Spanish dominations. By the time the United States acquired the territory (1803) and Louisiana became a state (1812), the institution of slavery was entrenched. By 1860, 47% of the state's population were enslaved, though the state also had one of the largest free black populations in the United States. Much of the white population, particularly in the cities, supported slavery, while pockets of support for the U.S. and its government existed in the more rural areas.

Events from the year 1861 in the United States. This year marked the beginning of the American Civil War.

Events from the year 1862 in the United States.

Events from the year 1863 in the United States.

Events from the year 1864 in the United States.

Events from the year 1865 in the United States. The American Civil War ends with the surrender of the Confederate States, beginning the Reconstruction era of U.S. history.

Ulysses S. Grant and the American Civil War Wartime career of the prominent Union General.

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1865 (MDCCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1865th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 865th year of the 2nd millennium, the 65th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1865, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1864th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 864th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1864, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. "The Spirit of Pestilence". University of Victoria. March 30, 2002. Archived from the original on October 2, 2015. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  2. Halen, Widar (1990). Christopher Dresser. Phaidon. p. 34. ISBN   0-7148-2952-8.
  3. "An Act to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri river to the Pacific ocean, and to secure to the government the use of the same for postal, military, and other purposes Archived May 27, 2016, at the Wayback Machine 12 Stat. 489, July 1, 1862
  4. Stormvoël van die Noorde by O JO Ferreira; Jan Viljoen – ‘n Transvaalse Wesgrenspionier (unpublished MA dissertation); documents and notes from the Jack Seale collection.
  5. ja:佐藤工業#沿革 (Japanese language edition) Retriveted date on July 16, 2020.