1864

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1864 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1864
MDCCCLXIV
Ab urbe condita 2617
Armenian calendar 1313
ԹՎ ՌՅԺԳ
Assyrian calendar 6614
Baháʼí calendar 20–21
Balinese saka calendar 1785–1786
Bengali calendar 1271
Berber calendar 2814
British Regnal year 27  Vict. 1   28  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2408
Burmese calendar 1226
Byzantine calendar 7372–7373
Chinese calendar 癸亥(Water  Pig)
4560 or 4500
     to 
甲子年 (Wood  Rat)
4561 or 4501
Coptic calendar 1580–1581
Discordian calendar 3030
Ethiopian calendar 1856–1857
Hebrew calendar 5624–5625
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1920–1921
 - Shaka Samvat 1785–1786
 - Kali Yuga 4964–4965
Holocene calendar 11864
Igbo calendar 864–865
Iranian calendar 1242–1243
Islamic calendar 1280–1281
Japanese calendar Bunkyū 4 / Genji 1
(元治元年)
Javanese calendar 1792–1793
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4197
Minguo calendar 48 before ROC
民前48年
Nanakshahi calendar 396
Thai solar calendar 2406–2407
Tibetan calendar 阴水猪年
(female Water-Pig)
1990 or 1609 or 837
     to 
阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1991 or 1610 or 838

1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1864th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 864th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1864, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

February 17: Submarine H. L. Hunley Css hunley on pier.jpg
February 17: Submarine H. L. Hunley

AprilJune

Clipper ship City of Adelaide in 1864 SV City Adelaide Dutton Lithograph.jpg
Clipper ship City of Adelaide in 1864
Battle of Heligoland in 1864 by Josef Carl Barthold Puettner Battle of Helgoland 1864.PNG
Battle of Heligoland in 1864 by Josef Carl Barthold Puettner
May 13: Battle of Resaca Battle of Resaca 1864 c1889.jpg
May 13: Battle of Resaca

JulySeptember

American Civil War in 1864 Map of American Civil War in 1864.svg
American Civil War in 1864
August 5: Battle of Mobile Bay Bataille de la baie de Mobile par Louis Prang (1824-1909).jpg
August 5: Battle of Mobile Bay
August 22: Signing of the First Geneva Convention Signing of the first geneva convention.jpg
August 22: Signing of the First Geneva Convention

OctoberDecember

Nov.15: Sherman's March to the Sea F.O.C. Darley and Alexander Hay Ritchie - Sherman's March to the Sea.jpg
Nov.15: Sherman's March to the Sea

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryMarch

Wilhelm Wien Wilhelm Wien 1911.jpg
Wilhelm Wien
Marguerite Durand Marguerite Durand par Jules Cayron.jpg
Marguerite Durand
Ana Echazarreta Ana Echazarreta Perez Cotapos.jpg
Ana Echazarreta

AprilJune

Max Weber Max Weber 1894.jpg
Max Weber
Richard Strauss, 1918 Max Liebermann Bildnis Richard Strauss.jpg
Richard Strauss, 1918
Walther Nernst Walther Nernst SI.jpg
Walther Nernst
Alois Alzheimer Alois Alzheimer 003.jpg
Alois Alzheimer

JulySeptember

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Photolautrec.jpg
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

OctoberDecember

Emma Sheridan Fry EMMA V. SHERIDAN FRY.jpg
Emma Sheridan Fry

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

John Sedgwick John Sedgwick.png
John Sedgwick
J. E. B. Stuart General "Jeb" Stuart, Confederate States of America, 1863, 1961 - 1986 - NARA - 518135.tif
J. E. B. Stuart

JulyDecember

Juan Jose Flores Juan Jose Flores.jpg
Juan José Flores
Princess Caraboo Illustration facing page 44, Devonshire Characters and Strange Events.png
Princess Caraboo

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1863rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 863rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1863, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1862 (MDCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1862nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 862nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1862, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Battle of Atlanta Battle of the American Civil War

The Battle of Atlanta was a battle of the Atlanta Campaign fought during the American Civil War on July 22, 1864, just southeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Continuing their summer campaign to seize the important rail and supply hub of Atlanta, Union forces commanded by William Tecumseh Sherman overwhelmed and defeated Confederate forces defending the city under John Bell Hood. Union Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson was killed during the battle. Despite the implication of finality in its name, the battle occurred midway through the campaign, and the city did not fall until September 2, 1864, after a Union siege and various attempts to seize railroads and supply lines leading to Atlanta. After taking the city, Sherman's troops headed south-southeastward toward Milledgeville, the state capital, and on to Savannah with the March to the Sea.

Joseph E. Johnston Confederate Army general (1807–1891)

Joseph Eggleston Johnston was an American career army officer, serving with distinction in the United States Army during the Mexican–American War (1846–1848) and the Seminole Wars. After Virginia seceded from the Union, he entered the Confederate States Army as one of its most senior general officers.

Shermans March to the Sea Military campaign during the American Civil War

Sherman's March to the Sea was a military campaign of the American Civil War conducted through Georgia from November 15 until December 21, 1864, by William Tecumseh Sherman, major general of the Union Army. The campaign began with Sherman's troops leaving the captured city of Atlanta on November 15 and ended with the capture of the port of Savannah on December 21. His forces followed a "scorched earth" policy, destroying military targets as well as industry, infrastructure, and civilian property, disrupting the Confederacy's economy and transportation networks. The operation broke the back of the Confederacy and helped lead to its eventual surrender. Sherman's decision to operate deep within enemy territory and without supply lines is considered to be one of the major campaigns of the war, and is taught by some historians as an early example of modern warfare or total war.

Army of the Tennessee Unit of the Union Army during the American Civil War

The Army of the Tennessee was a Union army in the Western Theater of the American Civil War, named for the Tennessee River.

Henry Warner Slocum American general, politician, railroader and businessman

Henry Warner Slocum, Sr., was a Union general during the American Civil War and later served in the United States House of Representatives from New York. During the war, he was one of the youngest major generals in the Army and fought numerous major battles in the Eastern Theater and in Georgia and the Carolinas. While commanding a regiment, a brigade, a division, and a corps in the Army of the Potomac, he saw action at First Bull Run, the Peninsula Campaign, Harpers Ferry, South Mountain, Antietam, and Chancellorsville.

Atlanta campaign Military campaign during the American Civil War

The Atlanta campaign was a series of battles fought in the Western Theater of the American Civil War throughout northwest Georgia and the area around Atlanta during the summer of 1864. Union Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman invaded Georgia from the vicinity of Chattanooga, Tennessee, beginning in May 1864, opposed by the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston.

Battle of Peachtree Creek 1864 battle of the American Civil War

The Battle of Peachtree Creek was fought in Georgia on July 20, 1864, as part of the Atlanta Campaign in the American Civil War. It was the first major attack by Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood since taking command of the Confederate Army of Tennessee. The attack was against Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's Union army, which was perched on the doorstep of Atlanta. The main armies in the conflict were the Union Army of the Cumberland, commanded by Maj. Gen. George Henry Thomas and two corps of the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

Battle of Ezra Church 1864 battle of the American Civil War

The Battle of Ezra Church, also known as the Battle of Ezra Chapel and the Battle of the Poor House saw Union Army forces under Major General William T. Sherman fight Confederate States Army troops led by Lieutenant General John B. Hood in Fulton County, Georgia during the Atlanta campaign in the American Civil War. Sherman sent Oliver Otis Howard's Union Army of the Tennessee circling around the west side of Atlanta with the purpose of cutting the Macon and Western Railroad. Hood countered the move by sending two corps commanded by Stephen D. Lee and Alexander P. Stewart to block the move. Before Howard's troops reached the railroad, the Confederates launched several attacks on them that were repulsed with heavy losses. Despite the tactical defeat, the Confederates prevented their foes from blocking the railroad.

The Army of the Ohio was the name of two Union armies in the American Civil War. The first army became the Army of the Cumberland and the second army was created in 1863.

The Valley campaigns of 1864 began as operations initiated by Union Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant and resulting battles that took place in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia during the American Civil War from May to October 1864. Some military historians divide this period into three separate campaigns. This article considers them together, as these campaigns interacted and built upon each other.

The Battle of Utoy Creek was fought August 4–7, 1864, during the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War. Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's Union armies had partially encircled the city of Atlanta, Georgia, which was being held by Confederate forces under the command of General John Bell Hood. Sherman had at this point adopted a strategy of attacking the railroad lines into Atlanta, hoping to cut off his enemies' supplies. This was the third direct attack on Confederate positions during the campaign and the effect of success would have ended the siege and won Atlanta on 6 August 1864.

Western Theater of the American Civil War Military operations in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, North Carolina, Kentucky, South Carolina and Tennessee, and Louisiana east of the Mississippi

The Western Theater of the American Civil War encompassed major military operations in the states of Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, North Carolina, Kentucky, South Carolina and Tennessee, as well as Louisiana east of the Mississippi River. Operations on the coasts of these states, except for Mobile Bay, are considered part of the Lower Seaboard Theater. Most other operations east of the Appalachian Mountains are part of the Eastern Theater. Operations west of the Mississippi River took place in the Trans-Mississippi Theater.

Georgia in the American Civil War Overview of the role of the Confederate state of Georgia during the American Civil War

Georgia was one of the original seven slave states that formed the Confederate States of America in February 1861, triggering the U.S. Civil War. The state governor, Democrat Joseph E. Brown, wanted locally raised troops to be used only for the defence of Georgia, in defiance of Confederate president Jefferson Davis, who wanted to deploy them on other battlefronts. When the Union blockade prevented Georgia from exporting its plentiful cotton in exchange for key imports, Brown ordered farmers to grow food instead, but the breakdown of transport systems led to desperate shortages.

Atlanta in the American Civil War

The city of Atlanta, Georgia, in Fulton County, was an important rail and commercial center during the American Civil War. Although relatively small in population, the city became a critical point of contention during the Atlanta Campaign in 1864 when a powerful Union Army approached from Union-held Tennessee. The fall of Atlanta was a critical point in the Civil War, giving the North more confidence, and leading to the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln and the eventual surrender of the Confederacy. The capture of the "Gate City of the South" was especially important for Lincoln as he was in a contentious election campaign against the Democratic opponent George B. McClellan.

Events from the year 1862 in the United States.

Events from the year 1864 in the United States.

Ulysses S. Grant and the American Civil War Wartime career of the prominent Union General.

Ulysses S. Grant was the most acclaimed Union general during the American Civil War and was twice elected president. Grant began his military career as a cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1839. After graduation he went on to serve with distinction as a lieutenant in the Mexican–American War. Grant was a keen observer of the war and learned battle strategies serving under Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. After the war Grant served at various posts especially in the Pacific Northwest; he was forced to retire from the service in 1854 due to accusations of drunkenness. He was unable to make a success of farming and on the onset of the Civil War in April 1861, Grant was working as a clerk in his father's leather goods store in Galena, Illinois. When the war began his military experience was needed, and Congressman Elihu B. Washburne became his patron in political affairs and promotions in Illinois and nationwide.

1865 (MDCCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1865th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 865th year of the 2nd millennium, the 65th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1865, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

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  2. "Deutsch-Dänischer Krieg von 1864". Meyers Konversationslexikon . 4th ed. (in German)
  3. Chaffin, Tom (2008). The H. L. Hunley: the Secret Hope of the Confederacy . New York: Hill and Wang. ISBN   978-0-8090-9512-4.
  4. Thelwell, Emma (January 24, 2008). "Société Générale: A history" . The Daily Telegraph . London. Archived from the original on January 12, 2022.
  5. "Great Central Fair Buildings, Philadelphia". World Digital Library . July 1864. Retrieved July 28, 2013.
  6. The capture of the Island of Als.
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  12. "History of Mizuho". The Oriental Economist. 1966. p. 574.